Clinical Neuroscience

[CONGRESS CALENDAR]

APRIL 20, 2003

Clinical Neuroscience - 2003;56(03-04)

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Clinical Neuroscience

[Neuropsychological applications of the Rey Complex Figure and Recognition Test]

F. FÖLDI Rita, TOMASOVSZKI László

[The authors describe the clinical applications of the Rey Complex Figure and Recognition Test and explain how the individual abilities and information-processing characteristics are reflected. Sequential and quantitative evaluation methods are presented. Summarizing the relation between IQ and RCFT they evaluate the differencies in task completion strategies of healthy subjects and subjects with brain damage, suggesting that these differences originate in changes of the information-processing capacity. Application of the RCFT in clinical child psychology is also suggested, primarily in differential diagnostics of children with attention disorder and disruptive disorder. The authors illustrate the protocols of the neuropsychological examination and the role of the RCFT with a case study.]

Clinical Neuroscience

[Report on the 1st Dystonia Day in Hungary]

KLIVÉNYI Péter

Clinical Neuroscience

[Cerebral sinusthrombosis and ulcerative colitis - two cases]

ILNICZKY Sándor, DEBRECZENI Róbert, KOVÁCS Tibor, SZIRMAI Imre

[Inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD) - ulcerative colitis and Crohn’s disease - are associated with increased risk for thrombotic complications both in the arterial and venous system. Cerebral sinus thrombosis is a rare but potentially fatal consequence of these diseases. Modern imaging methods made this uncommon complication of IBD more frequently recognized. The link between IBDs and thrombosis has been extensively studied. Inherited coagulation disorders (APC resistance, antithrombin III and protein-S deficiency), acquired diseases (antiphospholipid syndrome), and the frequent use of corticosteroids were suspected. Two cases of ulcerative colitis associated with cerebral sinusthrombosis successfully treated are reported. The connection between IBD and thrombotic complications and the therapeutic risks are discussed as well.]

Clinical Neuroscience

[Forum of Young Neurologists - Debrecen, September 13-14., 2002]

Clinical Neuroscience

[Biportal neuroendoscopy of the prepontine cisterns]

REISCH Róbert, FRIES Georg, PATONAY Lajos, PERNECZKY Axel

[Introduction - While bi- or multiportal approaches have been adopted in different fields of surgery including abdominal and spine surgery, the uniportal access into the skull is a traditional principle in neurosurgery. In this preclinical cadaver study the authors developed combinations of biportal endoneurosurgical dissections in the prepontine subarachnoid space to test the safety of this technique. Methods - In 34 fresh post-mortem adult human cadavers and 14 formaldehyde-fixed adult human head specimen a total of 48 biportal endoscopical dissections were carried out. 0°, 30°, and 70° lens scopes with a diameter of 1.7 and 4.2 mm and trochars with a diameter of 5.0 to 6.5 mm were used. Results - Six different endoscopic routes to the prepontine region and a total of 10 different combinations of this approaches could be described. Useful and safe biportal combinations were: 1. supraorbital on both sides, 2. supraorbital combined with ipsilateral anterior subtemporal, 3. supraorbital combined with contralateral anterior subtemporal, 4. supraorbital combined with ipsilateral posterior subtemporal, 5. supraorbital combined with ipsilateral frontal interhemispheric, 6. supraorbital combined with contralateral frontal interhemispheric, 7. anterior subtemporal combined with ipsilateral frontal interhemispheric, 8. anterior subtemporal combined with contralateral frontal interhemispheric. Conclusion - The biportal endomicrosurgical strategy offered effective and safe dissections within the prepontine subarachnoid space.]

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