Clinical Neuroscience

[Comment on the article of Dániel Bereczki et al. “The carrier model of neurology in Hungary: A proposal for the solution until 2020”]

HALÁSZ Péter

JANUARY 30, 2012

Clinical Neuroscience - 2012;65(01-02)

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Clinical Neuroscience

[Account on the scientific meeting of Környey Society in 2011. Part 2.]

Clinical Neuroscience

[LETTER OF THE EDITOR IN CHIEF]

RAJNA Péter, TAJTI János

Clinical Neuroscience

[CONGRESS CALENDAR]

Clinical Neuroscience

[The clinical relevance of 1p19q codeletion of oligodendrogliomas at the Department of Neurosurgery in Debrecen]

KLEKNER Álmos, FEKETE Gábor, RENCSI Márta, MÉHES Gábor, SZABÓ Péter, BOGNÁR László

[Object - To determine the clinical relevance of 1p19q codeletion in case of patients treated between 2006 and 2008 with oligodendroglial tumor at the Department of Neurosurgery, University of Debrecen. Questions - Beside the traditional morphological investigations, methods of rapidly developing molecular pathology are also available for routine diagnostic procedures. Numerous studies confirm that the codeletion of the 1p and 19q alleles has a clinical relevance regarding the sensitivity for chemotherapy. In this study the connection between the 1p19q codeletion and clinical parameters was tested to evaluate the prognostic role of this genetic alteration in neurosurgical patients. Methods, clinical data - In the present study experiences about the clinical relevance of 1p19 codeletion is summarized. Between 2006 and 2008, 28 patients with brain tumor containing oligodendroglial component was tested for 1p19q codeletion. The result of the analysis was compared with clinical data such as tumor localization, extent of resection, histological grade, presence of astrocyte component, time of first recurrence, age and gender. Furthermore, the potency of 1p19q codeletion as a prognostic factor for chemosensitivity by analyzing the data of patients who underwent different treatment protocols was also evaluated. Results - Our results suggest that 1p19q codeletion can be valued as a positive prognostic factor, which is concordant with the results available in the literature. We also found positive correlation with oligodendroglial component, recurrence free survival of grade III tumors, sensitivity to chemoand radiotherapy, and inverse correlation with histological grade and age was detected. Conclusion - Though the 1p19q codeletion is currently not the part of the routine patient management, based on our study we found it appropriate for clinical use as a prognostic factor, and its predictive role in establishing oncotherapy can be also discussed.]

Clinical Neuroscience

[Mutation analysis of alpha-galactosidase A gene in Hungarian Fabry patients]

LÁSZLÓ Aranka, TÖRÖK László, RAFFAI Sarolta, TÖRÖK Éva, SALLAY Éva, ENDREFFY Emőke, MORVAI László, AMSTEL Ploos Van JK

[Aim was to detect the mutations of alpha-galactosidase A gene in two Hungarian Fabry patients. Methods - Mutation analysis was performed by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) sequencing of the seven exons and adjacent introns of the alpha-galactosidase A gene. Results - Case 1. (19 y. male patient) Mutation analysis was done for alpha-galactosidase gene, a missence mutation has been identified in the 5th exon, the aspartic acid at codon 266 has been substituted by a tyrosine (notation D266Y) due to a G-T transversion at position 10287 of the alpha GAL-A gene. Case 2. (28 y. male Fabry patient) The GAL-A mutation has been proven to be R220X mutation in exon 5 of the alpha-galactosidase A gene.]

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[Comment to the article titled “Exploratory study of outcomes of blood sample mass examinations by rank correlations”]

Lege Artis Medicinae

[The author’s response to the comment on “Exploratory study of outcomes of blood sample mass examinations by rank correlations”]

Clinical Neuroscience

Cyanocobalamin and cholecalciferol synergistically improve functional and histopathological nerve healing in experimental rat model

ALBAY Cem, ADANIR Oktay, AKKALP Kahraman Asli, DOGAN Burcu Vasfiye, GULAEC Akif Mehmet, BEYTEMUR Ozan

Introduction - Peripheral nerve injury (PNI) is a frequent problem among young adults. Hopefully, regeneration can occur in PNI unlike central nervous system. If nerve cut is complete, gold standard treatment is surgery, but incomplete cuts have been tried to be treated by medicines. The aim of the study was to evaluate and compare clinical and histopathological outcomes of independent treatment of each of Vitamin B12 (B12) and Vitamin D3 (D3) and their combination on sciatic nerve injury in an experimental rat model. Materials and methods - Experimental animal study was performed after the approval of BEH Ethics Committee No. 2015/10. 32 rats were grouped into four (n=8) according to treatment procedures, such as Group 1 (controls with no treatment), Group 2 (intraperitoneal 1 mg/kg/day B12), Group 3 (oral 3500 IU/kg/week D3), Group 4 (intraperitoneal 1 mg/kg/day B12+ oral 3500 IU/kg/week D3). Sciatic Functional Index (SFI) and histopathological analysis were performed. Results - SFIs of Group 2, 3, 4 were statistically significantly higher than controls. Group 2 and 3 were statistically not different, however Group 4 was statistically significantly higher than others according to SFI. Axonal degeneration (AD) in all treatment groups were statistically significantly lower than in Group 1. AD in Group 4 was significantly lower than in Group 2 and 3; there was no significant difference between Group 2 and 3. There was no significant difference between Group 1,2 and 3 in Axonolysis (A). But A of Group 4 was significantly very much lower than all others. Oedema- inflammation (OE-I) in all treatment groups were significantly lower than in Group 1; there was no significant difference between Group 2 and group 4. OE-I in Group 2 and 4 were significantly lower than in Group 3. There were no significant differences between Group 1, 2 and 3 in damage level scores; score of Group 4 was significantly lower than of Group 1. Conclusions - B12 and D3 were found effective with no statistically significant difference. But combined use of B12 and D3 improve nerve healing synergistically. We recommend combined use of B12 and D3 after PNI as soon as possible.

Clinical Neuroscience

[Advanced Parkinson’s disease characteristics in clinical practice: Results from the OBSERVE-PD study and sub-analysis of the Hungarian data]

TAKÁTS Annamária, ASCHERMANN Zsuzsanna, VÉCSEI László, KLIVÉNYI Péter, DÉZSI Lívia, ZÁDORI Dénes, VALIKOVICS Attila, VARANNAI Lajos, ONUK Koray, KINCZEL Beatrix, KOVÁCS Norbert

[The majority of patients with advanced Parkinson’s disease are treated at specialized movement disorder centers. Currently, there is no clear consensus on how to define the stages of Parkinson’s disease; the proportion of Parkinson’s patients with advanced Parkinson’s disease, the referral process, and the clinical features used to characterize advanced Parkinson’s disease are not well delineated. The primary objective of this observational study was to evaluate the proportion of Parkinson’s patients identified as advanced patients according to physician’s judgment in all participating movement disorder centers across the study. Here we evaluate the Hungarian subset of the participating patients. The study was conducted in a cross-sectional, non-interventional, multi-country, multi-center format in 18 countries. Data were collected during a single patient visit. Current Parkinson’s disease status was assessed with Unified Parkinson’s Disease Rating Scale (UPDRS) parts II, III, IV, and V (modified Hoehn and Yahr staging). Non-motor symptoms were assessed using the PD Non-motor Symptoms Scale (NMSS); quality of life was assessed with the PD 8-item Quality-of-Life Questionnaire (PDQ-8). Parkinson’s disease was classified as advanced versus non-advanced based on physician assessment and on questions developed by the Delphi method. Overall, 2627 patients with Parkinson’s disease from 126 sites were documented. In Hungary, 100 patients with Parkinson’s disease were documented in four movement disorder centers, and, according to the physician assessment, 50% of these patients had advanced Parkinson’s disease. Their mean scores showed significantly higher impairment in those with, versus without advanced Parkinson’s disease: UPDRS II (14.1 vs. 9.2), UPDRS IV Q32 (1.1 vs. 0.0) and Q39 (1.1 vs. 0.5), UPDRS V (2.8 vs. 2.0) and PDQ-8 (29.1 vs. 18.9). Physicians in Hungarian movement disorder centers assessed that half of the Parkinson’s patients had advanced disease, with worse motor and non-motor symptom severity and worse QoL than those without advanced Parkinson’s disease. Despite being classified as eligible for invasive/device-aided treatment, that treatment had not been initiated in 25% of these patients.]

Clinical Neuroscience

To handle the HaNDL syndrome through a case: The syndrome of headache with neurologic deficits and cerebrospinal fluid lymphocytosis

ÇOBAN Eda, TEKER Ruken Serap, SERİNDAĞ Helin, SAKALLI Nazan, SOYSAL Aysun

The syndrome of headache with neurologic deficits and cerebrospinal fluid lymphocytosis (HaNDL) is a rare entity. This disease has been related to migrainous headaches. It is a benign, self-limited disorder, which is characterized by fluctuating neurological symptoms and cerebrospinal fluid lymphocytosis. We describe a case of a 47 years old man with acute onset of headache and aphasia. Cerebrospinal fluid analysis revealed a lymphocytic pleocytosis (25 cells/μl, 100% lymphocytes). Electroencephalogram showed moderate slow rhythm in the left hemisphere, with temporoparietal predominance, and without epileptiform activity. His blood tests as well as magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) results were normal. With the diagnosis of HaNDL syndrome the patient was accepted in the Department of Neurology and discharged with full recovery.