Clinical Neuroscience

[CLINICO-PATHOLOGY AND DIFFERENTIAL DIAGNOSIS OF BINSWANGER’S DISEASE]

KOVÁCS Tibor, SZIRMAI Imre, PAPP Mátyás

MARCH 10, 2005

Clinical Neuroscience - 2005;58(03-04)

[Pathologically, Binswanger’s disease is subcortical periventricular leucoencephalopathy sparing the U fibers. Clinically it is characterised by executive dysfunction, gait problems, urinary incontinence, pseudobulbar palsy, mood disturbances and dementia. The pathomechanism of Binswanger’s disease is unclear. It is hypothesized that it results from an ischemic-hypoxic injury of the periventricular white matter, which, in turn, can be caused by a sclerotic elongation of the medullary arteries, widening of the perivascular spaces or decreased brain perfusion due to hypotension or heart disease. The symptoms of Binswanger’s disease frequently overlap with those of normal pressure hydrocephalus, vascular parkinsonism and Alzheimer’s disease. A diagnostic criterion of Binswanger’s disease is radiologically demonstrated leukoaraiosis, which, on the other hand, is not equivalent with Binswanger’s disease. A good clinical response after lumbar puncture or shunt implantation might lead to confusion with normal pressure hydrocephalus, which further complicates the clinical diagnosis. It is likely that among the above mentioned disorders there are a number of transitional forms and overlaps, which might be explained by the common pathomechanism of disturbance in cerebrospinal fluid circulation.]

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[The primary prevention program of the Hungarian Spine Society aims to increase awareness of the need to develop and automatically maintain a biomechanically correct posture for all school children. The biomechanically correct posture is a dynamic balance based on a correct middle position of the pelvis and on muscle balance. In this position three important anatomical points - the left and right anterior superior iliac spines and the upper medial point of the pubic bone - form one frontal plane. From side-view the imaginary weight median of the body crosses the 2nd to 5th lumbar and the 2nd to 5th cervical vertebral bodies. When the muscles involved in posture are in balance, their strength and flexibility are just appropriate for the almost continuous work required against gravity. In case of static and/or dynamic under- or overload tonic muscles become shortened, and phasic muscles become stretched, and are no longer able to work optimally. Since many muscles and muscle parts that are involved in normal posture maintenance are not satisfactorily challenged in regular physical exercises and sport activities, the preventive exercise scheme of the Hungarian Spine Society aimed to involve these rarely used muscles in special strengthening and stretching exercises. The scheme is based on 12 test exercises that assess the strength and flexibility of postural muscles. A person who is able to do all test exercises correctly has no problem with his or her muscle balance. In order to counteract the harm caused by sedentary lifestyle already in childhood, regular use of this posture correction scheme in physical education starting from preschool throughout the school-years is recommended for all children.]

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[Background - Image fusion permits quantitative analysis of the consequences of 125 Iodine interstitial irradiation of brain tumors. The volume of tumor necrosis, reactive zone and edema can be compared to the dosimetric data. Patients and method - Nineteen patients with low grade glioma were analyzed on the average 14.5 months following 125 Iodine interstitial irradiation. Dose planning and image fusion were performed with the Target 1.19 (BrainLab) software. The CT/MR images showing the so called “triple ring” (necrosis, reactive ring and edema) developing after the interstitial irradiation of brain tumors were fused with the planning images and the isodose curves. The volume of the three regions was measured. Values at the intersections of isodose curves and necrosis borders were averaged and used for calculation of tumor necrosis. The volume of normal brain tissue irradiated by given dose values, as well as homogeneity and conformality indices were also determined. Results - The relative volumes of the different parts of the “triple-ring” compared to the reference dose volume were the following: necrosis 54.9%, reactive zone 59.7%, and edema 445.3% . Tumor necrosis developed at 71.9 Gy dose. At the irradiation of an average size glioma with a volume of 12.7 cm3, 5 to 7 cm3 normal brain tissue around the tumor received 60-70 Gy dose. The average homogeneity and conformality indices were 0.24 and 0.57, respectively. Conclusion - The analysis of changes in the volume of edema, reactive ring and necrosis caused by interstitial irradiation, and their correlation with the dozimetric data using the image fusion method provide useful information for patient follow-up, clinical management and further therapeutic decisions.]

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