Clinical Neuroscience

[Celebrating speech on the unveiling of the statue of academic dr. Sántha Kálmán on the 50th anniversary of his death]

VÉCSEI László

JANUARY 20, 2007

Clinical Neuroscience - 2007;60(01-02)

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Clinical Neuroscience

[31th Congress of the Hungarian Pediatric Neurological, Neurosurgical, Pediatric and Adolescent Psychiatric Society]

NAGY Andrea

Clinical Neuroscience

[NONSENSE MUTATION 193C>T OF NEUROFIBROMATOSIS TYPE 2 - A NEUROSURGICAL CHALLENGE]

BOBEST Mátyás, TÓTH Csaba, GYURCSÓ Mária, MOLNÁR Mária Judit, GARZULY Ferenc

[A 15 years old male was operated because of incidentally found intercostal schwannoma. Two years later severe cerebellar ataxy and left sided anacusis developed. MRI revealed bilateral vestibularis tumors and multiple cervical intradural extramedullar myelon compressing lesions. After partial resection of the huge left sided cerebello-pontin tumor, histologically schwannoma, and the exstirpation of the multiple cervical meningiomas the patient died three months later due to septic complications. The 24 years old mother had been operated on similar lesions 12 years earlier, after two weeks postoperative period she died. Her 14 years old twins are living, a boy also with bilateral acustic tumours and a girl who is intact. Genetic investigation revealed C>T nonsense mutation at position 193 in the exon 2 of the NF2 gene. This mutation cause premature truncation of the gene protein and is probably in connection with the clinically severe phenotype. Early diagnosis of this type of neurofibromatosis is mandatory concerning the therapy.]

Clinical Neuroscience

[CONGRESS CALENDAR]

Clinical Neuroscience

[Some additional thoughts on sudden/unexpected death (SUDEP) in epilepsy]

RAJNA Péter, BARAN Brigitta, VERES Judit

Clinical Neuroscience

[THE FAMILIAL INCIDENCE OF EPILEPSY IN THE GROUP OF EPILEPTIC PATIENTS EXAMINED AFTER THEIR FIRST SEIZURE - PILOT STUDY]

RÓZSAVÖLGYI Margit, RAJNA Péter

[Introduction - It is essential to identify the genetic factors of epilepsy in the every day clinical practice for several reasons. The proof of the genetically defined sub-clusters existing inside the epileptic disease group is significant in diagnoses and therapy. The risk of inheriting epilepsy could influence the patient’s family planning which has a great impact on their quality of life. The aim of the study - To analyse clinical data obtained from patients examined after their first provoked or unprovoked seizure and the observation of the recurrence of seizures. To compare the data obtained with the familial occurrence of epilepsy. Population and methods - Data was obtained from a questionnaire developed by the authors. The epileptic patients with positive familial data underwent to an analysis of their family tree. Results - Of 120 persons who were examined the prevalence of epilepsy in their family was 20.4%. This corresponds to the familial prevalence of generalised epilepsy according to the published clinical data. The recurrence of seizures was experienced by 32% of the patients with a family background affected by epilepsy. The risk of reoccurring seizures was the highest if the familial epilepsy manifested itself in the same generation (among brothers or sisters) and if we were able to register epileptiform activity on the interictal EEG. According to our clinical data the genetic set up can play a role also in the provoked first epileptic seizure. The incidence of familial epilepsy was found high (12.72%) in the presence of incidental epileptic seizures when the EEG was free of epileptiform alterations. Conclusion - 1. The genetic basis for the first epileptic seizure in the population of young adults approaches the data known in idiopathic generalised epilepsy irrespective of the fact whether it was related to the seizure provoking factors or not. 2. The risk of seizure reactivation was higher in non-provoked seizures then at the incidental epileptic symptoms. Seizure reactivation had to be taken into consideration when epileptiform patterns appeared on the patient's EEG and/or epileptic symptoms were experienced by the patient's brother or sister. The probability of reoccurring seizures was lower if the epileptic seizures manifested in parents or earlier generations.]

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Neuroscience highlights: Main cell types underlying memory and spatial navigation

KRABOTH Zoltán, KÁLMÁN Bernadette

Interest in the hippocampal formation and its role in navigation and memory arose in the second part of the 20th century, at least in part due to the curious case of Henry G. Molaison, who underwent brain surgery for intractable epilepsy. The temporal association observed between the removal of his entorhinal cortex along with a significant part of hippocampus and the developing severe memory deficit inspired scientists to focus on these regions. The subsequent discovery of the so-called place cells in the hippocampus launched the description of many other functional cell types and neuronal networks throughout the Papez-circuit that has a key role in memory processes and spatial information coding (speed, head direction, border, grid, object-vector etc). Each of these cell types has its own unique characteristics, and together they form the so-called “Brain GPS”. The aim of this short survey is to highlight for practicing neurologists the types of cells and neuronal networks that represent the anatomical substrates and physiological correlates of pathological entities affecting the limbic system, especially in the temporal lobe. For that purpose, we survey early discoveries along with the most relevant neuroscience observations from the recent literature. By this brief survey, we highlight main cell types in the hippocampal formation, and describe their roles in spatial navigation and memory processes. In recent decades, an array of new and functionally unique neuron types has been recognized in the hippocampal formation, but likely more remain to be discovered. For a better understanding of the heterogeneous presentations of neurological disorders affecting this anatomical region, insights into the constantly evolving neuroscience behind may be helpful. The public health consequences of diseases that affect memory and spatial navigation are high, and grow as the population ages, prompting scientist to focus on further exploring this brain region.

Clinical Neuroscience

A rare entity of acquired idiopathic generalised anhidrosis which has been successfully treated with pulse steroid therapy: Does the histopathology predict the treatment response?

ÖKTEM Özdemir Ece, ÇANKAYA Şeyda, UYKUR Burak Abdullah, ERDEN Simsek Nazan, YULUG Burak

Acquired idiopathic generalised anhidrosis is an uncommon sweating disorder characterized by loss of sweating in the absence of any neurologic, metabolic or sweat gland abnormalities. Although some possible immunological and structural mechanisms have been proposed for this rare entity, the definitive pathophysiology is still un­clear. Despite some successfully treated cases with systemic corticosteroid application, the dose and route of steroid application are controversial. Here, we present a 41-year-old man with lack of genera­lised sweating who has been successfully treated with high dose pulse intravenous prednisolone. We have discussed his clinical and histopathological findings as well as the treatment options in view of the current literature.

Clinical Neuroscience

To handle the HaNDL syndrome through a case: The syndrome of headache with neurologic deficits and cerebrospinal fluid lymphocytosis

ÇOBAN Eda, TEKER Ruken Serap, SERİNDAĞ Helin, SAKALLI Nazan, SOYSAL Aysun

The syndrome of headache with neurologic deficits and cerebrospinal fluid lymphocytosis (HaNDL) is a rare entity. This disease has been related to migrainous headaches. It is a benign, self-limited disorder, which is characterized by fluctuating neurological symptoms and cerebrospinal fluid lymphocytosis. We describe a case of a 47 years old man with acute onset of headache and aphasia. Cerebrospinal fluid analysis revealed a lymphocytic pleocytosis (25 cells/μl, 100% lymphocytes). Electroencephalogram showed moderate slow rhythm in the left hemisphere, with temporoparietal predominance, and without epileptiform activity. His blood tests as well as magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) results were normal. With the diagnosis of HaNDL syndrome the patient was accepted in the Department of Neurology and discharged with full recovery.

Clinical Neuroscience

Isolated hypoglossal nerve palsy due to a jugular foramen schwannoma

ÖZTOP-CAKMAK Özgür, VANLI-YAVUZ Ebru, AYGÜN Serhat, BASTAN Birgül, EGEMEN Emrah, SOLAROGLU Ihsan, GURSOY-OZDEMIR Yesemin

Introduction – Although the involvement of the hypoglossal nerve together with other cranial nerves is common in several pathological conditions of the brain, particularly the brainstem, isolated hypoglossal nerve palsy is a rare condition and a diagnostic challenge. Case presentation – The presented patient arrived to the hospital with a history of slurred speech and an uncomfortable sensation on his tongue. Neurological examination showed left-sided hemiatrophy of the tongue with fasciculations and deviation towards the left side during protrusion. Based on the clinical and MRI findings, a diagnosis of hypoglossal nerve schwannoma was made. Discussion – Hypoglossal nerve palsy may arise from multiple causes such as trauma, infections, neoplasms, and endocrine, autoimmune and vascular pathologies. In our case, the isolated involvement of the hypoglossal nerve was at the skull base segment, where the damage to the hypoglossal nerve may occur mostly due to metastasis, nasopharyngeal carcinomas, nerve sheath tumors and glomus tumors. Conclusion – Because of the complexity of the region’s anatomy, the patient diagnosed with hypoglossal nerve schwannoma was referred for gamma knife radiosurgery.

Clinical Neuroscience

[Decisional collisions between evidence and experience based medicine in care of people with epilepsy]

RAJNA Péter

[Background – Based on the literature and his long-term clinical practice the author stresses the main collisions of evidence and experience based medicine in the care of people with epilepsy. Purpose – To see, what are the professional decisions of high responsibility in the epilepsy-care, in whose the relevant clinical research is still lacking or does not give a satisfactory basis. Methods – Following the structure of the Hungarian Guideline the author points the critical situations and decisions. He explains also the causes of the dilemmas: the lack or uncertainty of evidences or the difficulty of scientific investigation of the situation. Results – There are some priorities of experience based medicine in the following areas: definition of epilepsy, classification of seizures, etiology – including genetic background –, role of precipitating and provoking factors. These are able to influence the complex diagnosis. In the pharmacotherapy the choice of the first drug and the optimal algorithm as well as the tasks during the care are also depends on personal experiences sometimes contradictory to the official recommendations. Same can occur in the choice of the non-pharmacological treatments and rehabilitation. Discussion and conclusion – Personal professional experiences (and interests of patients) must be obligatory accessories of evidence based attitude, but for achieving the optimal results, in some situations they replace the official recommendations. Therefore it is very important that the problematic patients do meet experts having necessary experiences and also professional responsibility to help in these decisions. ]