Ca&Bone

[The risk factors of osteoporosis and osteoporotic fractures in Hungarian women: the results of the NOKK study]

MEZŐ Tibor1, TABÁK Ádám1, BHATTOA Harjit Pál2, LAKATOS Péter1

DECEMBER 28, 2009

Ca&Bone - 2009;12(03)

[INTRODUCTION - It is widely accepted from Western European and the US studies that race and geography significantly affect the risk for osteoporosis. Less is known about similar associations in Eastern European subjects. Our aim was to describe the risk factors for osteoporotic fractures and osteoporosis in a selected female population in a cross-sectional, multi-center study performed under the guidance of the Hungarian Society for osteoporosis and Osteoarthrology. MATERIAL AND METHOD - From 10 randomly selected regional osteoporosis centers, altogether 2602 women >18 years of age, referred with any osteoarthrological reason, participated. During their visit data on risk factors, blood pressure, anthropometry, and bone mineral density were collected. RESULTS - Using multiple regression we found that older age, lower diastolic blood pressure, family history of bone fracture, fall in previous year and lower T-score were independently related to fractures. Independent risk factors for femoral osteoporosis included older age, lower weight, family history of fracture, less physical activity, fall in the previous year and glucocorticoid treatment. DISCUSSION - Our study is the first large-scale epidemiological survey describing risk factors of osteoporosis and fractures in a Hungarian female population. Our data may suggest that lower diastolic blood pressure might be related to osteoporotic fractures.]

AFFILIATIONS

  1. Semmelweis Egyetem, Általános Orvosi Kar, I. sz. Belgyógyászati Klinika, Budapest
  2. Debreceni Egyetem, Orvos- és Egészségtudományi Centrum, Szülészeti és Nôgyógyászati Klinika, Regionális Osteoporosis Centrum, Debrecen

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[Vitamin D in autoimmun disorders: the immunregulatory effect of vitamin D and therapeutic opportunities]

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[There is recent evidence that genetic and environmental factors play an important role in the development of autoimmune diseases. Vitamin D deficiency is one of the environmental factors that may play a role in developing autoimmune diseases. Low vitamin D status has been implicated in the etiology of autoimmune diseases such as multiple sclerosis, systemic lupus erythematosus, rheumatoid arthritis, inzulin dependent diabetes mellitus, and inflammatory bowel disease. Experimentally, vitamin D deficiency results in an increased incidence of autoimmune disease. The authors discuss the accumulating evidence pointing to a link between vitamin D and autoimmunity. The optimal level of vitamin D intake is necessary to normalize the immune functions and it plays an important role in the development of self-tolerance. Targets for vitamin D in the immune system have been identified and the mechanism of vitamin D mediated immunoregulation is beginning to be understood. On the basic of recent knowledge, vitamin D causes a decrease in Th1-driven autoimmune response and repairs the function of regulatory T cells. Increased vitamin D intakes might decrease the incidence and severity of autoimmune diseases.]

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[Hip fractures in Hungary between 2001 and 2008 - Assessment of the beneficial effect of bisphosphonates on the risk of hip fractures on the basis of Hungarian data]

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[The overall prevalence of osteoporosis in developed countries is estimated to be 9-15%. Mortality in the first year after the fracture is 15-20%, and half of the survivors remain partly or fully dependent on others’ support. Owing to the increasing life expectance and the diseases of civilisation, the incidence of osteoporotic fractures is expected to double in the next thirty years. The network of centers that has been developed since 1995 under the National Osteoporosis Program and the accreditation system of the National Osteoporosis Center provided up-to-date education of the physicians (densitometry assistants) who work within the network. The diagnostic restrictions followed by the reduction of support to 70% since 2006 fall resulted in a dramatic reduction in the number of treated patients.]

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[This review describes the function and tissuespecific expression of the 11- and 17-beta-hydroxysteroid- dehydrogenase enzyme families as well as the aromatase and 1-alpha-hydroxylase enzymes. Recently, in situ formation of active steroids by these enzymes at the sites of their actions from biologically inactive precursors in the circulation have been demonstrated to play an important role in sex steroid-dependent neoplasms (such as breast and prostate cancer), and in some metabolic diseases (such as obesity, osteoporosis and insulin resistance). Tissuespecific Cushing syndrome (local hypercortisolism) may contribute to the pathogenesis of the latter group of diseases, suggesting that obesity may be considered the Cushing-syndrome of the omentum and that osteoporosis is the obesity of bone. Intracrinology is the science of alterations in tissue hormone synthesis catalysed by enzymes such as those mentioned above, which cannot be detected by measuring circulating hormone levels. The effects of local hormone production differ from those of the well-described autocrine, paracrine and endocrine actions. Based on the hormonal changes within various tissues, the pathogenesis of a number of diseases may be interpreted in a novel way.]

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[INTRODUCTION - Data on bone mineral density (BMD) in diabetes mellitus are contradictory in the literature. Early studies described a decreased bone mineral density in type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM), but recent studies report no osteopenia in T1DM.The BMD may depend on the quality of treatment for diabetes mellitus and on the presence of chronic complications. In type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) the BMD is not decreased, occasionally it can even be increased. PATIENTS AND METHODS - Bone mineral density was measured in 122 regularly controlled diabetic patients (T1DM: n=73, mean age: 43.6±11.1 years,T2DM: n=49, mean age: 61.8±9.8 years) by dual energy X-ray absorptiometry at the lumbar spine and at the femur. Results were compared to those of 40 metabolically healthy control persons with a mean age of 47.5±11.9 years.The patients’ carbohydrate metabolism was assessed by the average HbA1c level of the last three years.These values were 7.9±1.4 % in T1DM, and 7.5±1.7 % in T2DM. BMDs were classified based on the T-score and Z-score using the WHO criteria. RESULTS - There was no significant difference in T1DM or in T2DM compared to the reference group in the prevalence of either osteoporosis or of osteoporosis and osteopenia combined. CONCLUSION - BMD was not found to be decreased in patients with well-controlled metabolism compared to healthy controls.]

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[A magnézium és csonthatásai]

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[Since 1932, a number of animal studies have demonstrated the correlation of hypomagnesaemia and hypocalcaemia, and the variety of skeletal abnormalities resulting from low magnesium (Mg) intake. Several studies have shown that patients with osteoporosis have a decreased serum magnesium level, which is related to decreased bone mineral content and increased bone fragility. Mg has multiple physiological effects, thus it is not surprising that dozens of hypomagnesaemia-related diseases and symptoms have been reported. Adequate Mg concentration is necessary for the secretion of parathormone and its effect on target organs, activation of vitamin D in the kidney, the maintenance of calcium homeostasis, bone mineralisation and regeneration. Mild hypomagnesaemia is associated with general, atypical symptoms, whereas severe Mg deficiency is a life-threatening condition. Its concentration should be measured in serum and urine. Mg metabolism is determined by its absorption from the intestines and reabsorption in the kidneys. Recently revealed details of these processes give some insights into the mechanisms underlying a number of Mg deficient conditions related to genetic or medical reasons. Mg supplementation may be indicated for patient populations with the highest risk of hypomagnesaemia. For supplementation, the recommended total Mg dose is 350 mg, first in higher doses, several times per day for a longer period, complemented with Ca and K supplementation. Overdosing can only occur in patients with impaired renal function, which necessitates careful monitoring. Adequate Mg supplementation is an inexpensive, safe and effective preventive and therapeutic option for many diseases.]

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[INTRODUCTION - Osteoporosis is defined as a loss of bone tissue and bone mass that leads to a compromised trength and quality of bones and thus to an increased risk of fractures. In many women, menopausal hormonal changes are associated with an increased bone loss. This population has postmenopausal osteoporosis. The essence of osteporosis treatment is the adequate calcium and vitamin D supplementation, which, if needed, might be combined with drug therapy to inhibit the process of bone loss. METHODS - We assessed the adherence to therapy of Hungarian patients and its effect on the risk of bone fractures, using data recorded by the National Health Insurance Fund Administration between 2004 and 2010 (n=223068, mean age: 69.9 years). We performed a statistical analyses of the available data. Medication possession ratio (MPR) for each treatment and the ratio of patients receiving continuous treatment in the study period (for 12, 18 and 24 months) were estimated. Medication persistence was investigated using Kaplan-Meier survival analysis. A multivariate Cox proportional hazard model was used to determine the factors influencing the risk of fracture. RESULTS, CONCLUSION - The results of our study show that medication adherence to treatment is low among Hungarian patients [mean MPR: 57.9%; 95% CI (57.7%- 58.0%) and persistence rate: 32.4%; 95% CI (32.2%-32.6%) in the first year]. These parameters are substantially influenced by the administration route and the frequency of treatments [mean MPR ranged 41.5%- 100% and persistence rates ranged 18.8%- 100% in the first year, differences between subgroups were significant (p<0,05)]. Our compliance as well as persistance studies showed that parenteral administration had more beneficial effects. Confirming our preliminary hypotheses, the improvement of patient compliance significantly reduced fracture risk (good compliance was defined as MPR>80%, which was associated with RR: 0.57, p<0.05 for fracture risk). Further improvement might be achieved by parenteral administration [RR for fracture risk 0.60 compared with non-compliant patients and 0.44 compared with compliant subgroups treated with oral and parenteral medications (p<0.05)].]

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[Secondary osteoporosis in gastrointestinal diseases]

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