Ca&Bone

[The effect of sex hormone replacement on radial bone mineral content in boys with panhypopituitarism]

HOSSZÚ ÉVA1, PÁL Csilla2, TOMSITS Erika1

SEPTEMBER 20, 2005

Ca&Bone - 2005;8(03)

[INTRODUCTION - Children with pituitary insufficiency normally receive growth hormone and thyroid hormone substitution, but glucocorticoid treatment is rarely necessary. Sex hormone replacement is introduced in puberty, which, at the same time, promotes growth and bone maturation. In this study the effect of testosterone replacement on bone mineral content was examined. PATIENTS AND METHODS - Nine boys (16.3±1.3 years) with hypopituitarism were involved in the study who had been receiving growth hormone and thyroid hormone replacement for several years by the beginning of the study.Androgen was substituted by the intramuscular administration of 50 mg testosterone biweekly.The children's height,weight, the rate of pubescence, and bone age were checked, and bone mineral density was measured by single photon absorptiometry every six month. During the substitution treatment serum thyroxin and testosterone levels remained in the normal ranges. RESULTS - A significant increase in bone mineral density was observed during the testosterone treatment, with Z-scores -1.80, -0.91 and +0.14 at baseline, 12 and 24 months, respectively (p<0,001). Z-scores adjusted for bone age remained in the normal range throughout the study (-0.904 at baseline and -0.946 at one year). CONCLUSION - The increase rate of bone mineral density (0.16 g/cm/year) was significantly higher compared both to the normal reference in this age group (0.07 g/cm/yr, p=0.0015) and to the normal reference relative to their bone age (p<0.0006). The increase in bone mineral density suggests that testosterone replacement has an important role both in the quantitative and qualitative development of bones.]

AFFILIATIONS

  1. Semmelweis Egyetem, Általános Orvostudományi Kar, II. Sz. Gyermekgyógyászati Klinika, Budapest
  2. Bethesda Gyermekkórház, a Magyarországi Református Egyház Gyermekkórháza, Budapest

COMMENTS

0 comments

Further articles in this publication

Ca&Bone

[Serum 25(OH)-Vitamin D levels and bone metabolism in patients on maintenance hemodialysis]

ALMÁSI Csilla, AMBRUS Csaba, DEÁK György, MARTON Adrienn, BERTA Klára, LAKATOS Péter, SZABÓ András, HORVÁTH CSABA, MUCSI István

[INTRODUCTION - Increasing evidence suggests that 25- hydroxy vitamin D3 (25(OH)D3) may contribute to the bone health of patients with chronic kidney disease.However, there is very little information available on the vitamin D3 status of patients with chronic renal failure. In a cross-sectional study we assessed the association between vitamin D3 status and parathyroid function, bone turnover, bone mass and structure in patients on maintenance haemodialysis. PATIENTS AND METHODS - Sixty-nine patients on maintenance haemodialysis were assessed by bone densitometry (DEXA) and quantitative bone ultrasound. Serum 25-hydroxy vitamin D3 levels and serum markers of bone turnover were simultaneously measured. RESULTS - A high prevalence of potentially significant vitamin D3 deficiency was found in this patient group; 59% of the patients had their 25(OH)D3 vitamin level below 20 nmol/l.There was a significant negative correlation between serum 25(OH)D3 and serum intact parathormone (iPTH) levels (r=-0.231, p<0.05) and this association remained significant after controlling for potential co-variables. Furthermore, a positive correlation was observed between serum 25(OH)D3 concentration and bone mineral density measured at the radius (r=0.424, p<0.01). Finally,we show for the first time that 25(OH)D3 levels are significantly and independently associated with broad band ultrasound attenuation (β =0.237, p<0.05) measured with calcaneal quantitative bone ultrasound in patients with chronic renal failure. CONCLUSION - Vitamin D3 deficiency may contribute to the impaired bone health of patients on maintenance dialysis, therefore, it seems to be warranted regularly monitoring and carefully controlling the D3-vitamin level of these patients.The results also suggest that quantitative bone ultrasound is useful in assessing bone health of patients with chronic renal failure.]

Ca&Bone

[About risk factors of osteoporotic fractures - Fractures of bones, quality of bone, age, quality of life]

BALOGH Ádám

Ca&Bone

[Hungarian and international results in compliance of antiporotic treatment]

BORS Katalin, HORVÁTH CSABA

[The studies investigate the compliance of treatment showed that the compliance is one of the most important factor which influence the success of an otherwise effective treatment. Not only the patients, but also the doctors and nurses are responsible for the unsuccessful treatment. Our article shortly review Hungarian and international data about the compliance of antiporotic treatment and summarises a study which we plan to achieve in the near future.]

Ca&Bone

[The role of calcium in the chemoprevention of colorectal cancer]

FUSZEK Péter, SPEER Gábor

[One of the most exciting research areas of the past decade has concerned the chemoprevention of colorectal cancer (CRC). Numerous clinical studies have been conducted on the preventive role of NSAIDs, high fibre intake, selenium, phytooestrogens, hormone replacement therapy, antioxidants, COX-inhibitors, folic acid and calcium, however, their results are controversial. Among the suggested chemopreventive agents, the preventive role of calcium is supported by the strongest evidence.This paper aims to review the available facts on the role of calcium. Recent studies suggest that appropriate calcium intake may partially counterbalance the effect of the genes that contribute to the development of CRC. Experimental data show that calcium directly influences the expression of several genes involved in tumorigenesis and that it is also involved in a number of signalling pathways that control cell proliferation, differentiation and apoptosis.These effects mostly arise through the activation of the calcium sensing receptor. The main goal of this review is to draw attention to the established chemopreventive role of calcium in CRC. Published data suggest that a lifelong daily calcium intake between 1200 to 1500 mg (even 2000 mg in high risk groups) would significantly decrease the incidence of CRC by inhibition of tumorigenesis.]

Ca&Bone

[Dear Colleagues and Readers!]

HORVÁTH CSABA

All articles in the issue

Related contents

Ca&Bone

[The role of alfacalcidol in the prevention of osteopenia following renal transplantation]

BERCZI Csaba, ASZTALOS László, KINCSES Zsolt, BALOGH Ádám, LŐCSEY Lajos, BALÁZS György, LUKÁCS Géza

[AIM - The aim of this prospective study was the long-term evaluation of the effect of calcium and alfacalcidol treatment on calcium metabolism in patients with renal transplantation. METHODS - Patients were divided in two groups. Patients in Group 1 (n=159) received calcium substitution, while patients in Group 2 (n=81) were treated with alfacalcidol. Serum Ca, P, Mg, alkaline phosphatase (AP) and PTH levels were determined before and after transplantation regularly for three years. Femur neck and lumbar vertebral bone mineral densities (BMD) were measured at the same time after transplantation. RESULTS - After transplantation the mean serum calcium level significantly increased, while the mean serum phosphate level significantly decreased in both groups. After the operation the PTH levels decreased in both groups and it was found to be more pronounced in the alfacalcidol group.The majority of patients had osteopenia in the follow-up period. Between the third month and the third year after transplantation, BMD increased by 9.4% in Group1, and decreased by 4% in Group 2 at the lumbar spine. At 3 years the mean BMD value at the femoral neck was increased by 6.5% in Group 1, and by 6.7% in Group 2, compared to the 3-month values.The change in BMD was only significant at the lumbar spine, in Group 1 (p=0.019). During the follow-up period osteonecrosis was diagnosed in 6 patients in Group 1 and in 9 cases in Group 2. CONCLUSION - Alfacalcidol treatment decreased secondary hyperparathyroidism more rapidly and effectively, which was also indicated by the more pronounced decrease of serum PTH levels. During the 3 years follow-up period, BMD increased in both groups except for the lumbar spine in Group 2, however, the majority of the patients still had osteopenia.The study could not demonstrate a superiority of alfacalcidol over calcium supplementation in the prevention of posttransplantational osteopenia.]

LAM KID

[A magnézium és csonthatásai]

BAJNOK Éva

[Since 1932, a number of animal studies have demonstrated the correlation of hypomagnesaemia and hypocalcaemia, and the variety of skeletal abnormalities resulting from low magnesium (Mg) intake. Several studies have shown that patients with osteoporosis have a decreased serum magnesium level, which is related to decreased bone mineral content and increased bone fragility. Mg has multiple physiological effects, thus it is not surprising that dozens of hypomagnesaemia-related diseases and symptoms have been reported. Adequate Mg concentration is necessary for the secretion of parathormone and its effect on target organs, activation of vitamin D in the kidney, the maintenance of calcium homeostasis, bone mineralisation and regeneration. Mild hypomagnesaemia is associated with general, atypical symptoms, whereas severe Mg deficiency is a life-threatening condition. Its concentration should be measured in serum and urine. Mg metabolism is determined by its absorption from the intestines and reabsorption in the kidneys. Recently revealed details of these processes give some insights into the mechanisms underlying a number of Mg deficient conditions related to genetic or medical reasons. Mg supplementation may be indicated for patient populations with the highest risk of hypomagnesaemia. For supplementation, the recommended total Mg dose is 350 mg, first in higher doses, several times per day for a longer period, complemented with Ca and K supplementation. Overdosing can only occur in patients with impaired renal function, which necessitates careful monitoring. Adequate Mg supplementation is an inexpensive, safe and effective preventive and therapeutic option for many diseases.]

LAM KID

[Morphometric vertebral fractures in the clinical practice]

SZABÓ Tamás, KORÁNYI András, DEÁK Eszter

[The authors surveyed the international literature concerning the prevalence and importance of osteoporotic vertebral fractures, then presented the modern diagnostic techniques (semiquantitative visual and quantitative morphometry, densitometry). These data indicates that plain X-rays, commonly used in everyday practice, underestimate the prevalence of vertebral fractures, therefore morphometric methods are also needed for more accurate fracture risk assessment.]

LAM KID

[Alterations in bone metabolism associated with gastrointestinal diseases]

LŐRINCZY Katalin, LAKATOS Péter László, MIHELLER Pál, RÁCZ Károly

[Osteoporosis is commonly associated with certain gastrointestinal diseases. Osteoporosis occurs most often in patients with coeliac disease, inflammatory bowel disease, chronic liver disease and following gastric surgery. Prevention, diagnosis and therapy are based on the experiences with elderly and postmenopausal patients with osteoporosis. In this review, we summarise the clinical data regarding bone loss associated with gastrointestinal diseases.]

Lege Artis Medicinae

[The importance of vitamin D deficiency in practice]

TAKÁCS István

[The effects of vitamin D in bone health have been known since the 1920s. Recently, it has been proven that its role in the body is much more complex. Activated vitamin D is a steroid hormone that regulates transcription of more than 200 human genes through its receptor that is detectable in almost all types of cells. In contrast to the former conceptions, it can be activated not only in the kidneys; moreover, local 1-α-hydroxylation plays a greater role in its extraskeletal effects. Vitamin D deficiency, currently defined as serum levels of <30 ng/ml, is caused by the lack of ‘effective’ sunlight exposition. Thus, vitamin D deficiency is one of the most frequent deficiencies in the developed world that plays a role not only in the development of skeletal conditions but many other diseases, as well. A low vitamin D level causes a reduced calcium absorption, a higher bone remodelling rate and increased bone loss. It also reduces muscle strength and increases the risk of falling. Normal vitamin D status is required for the effectiveness of drugs for osteoporosis treatment; however vitamin D treatment in itself is not effective in osteoporosis. An increasing number of studies show the benefits of vitamin D supplementation and treatment in extraskeletal conditions. Vitamin D plays an important role in the prevention of several auto-immune diseases, infections, cardiovascular diseases, and cancers. Therefore, all UV-B radiation-deprived adults require an intake of vitamin D to maintain a level of >30 ng/ml. Vitamin D3 treatment is safe. The necessary dose can be reliably approximated by the calculation that an incremental consumption of 100 IU/day raises serum vitamin levels by 1,0 ng/ml. Clinical trials suggest that for the vast majority of individuals, a prolonged intake of 10,000 IU/day does not pose any risk.]