Search results

Clinical Neuroscience

JULY 30, 2018

[Strategies of using the new antiepileptic drugs for epilepsy in adults]

NIKL János

[The new antiepileptic drugs have not changed the basic pharmacological treatment principles of epilepsy, but they have given greater choice in focal and in generalized epilepsies as well. The new drugs are not necessarily more effective than traditional drugs, but they have favourable pharmacokinetic characteristics, fewer interactions and better adverse effect profile in the acute and chronic phase of the treatment. They generally show a lower teratogenicity risk than the standard antiepileptics, although carbamazepine, one of the standard drugs can be used and zonisamide, a new one must be avoid in pregnancy. Due to characteristics mentioned above they are not only effective as add-on therapy, but in monotherapy as well. On the basis of the international and national recommendation lamotrigine and levetiracetam belong to the first line antiepileptics. The favourable tolerability of the new antiepileptics may improve the patient’s compliance and adherence to the given treatment. The low teratogenicity makes them especially suitable for the treatment of women of childbearing age. The new antiepileptic drugs can succesfully used for the treatment of special patients’ groups as for the post stroke, poszttraumatic epilepsies, for the epilepsies accompanied with brain tumours as well as for epilepsies in the elderly. The new drugs are advantageous for the treatment of such patients who have psychiatric symptoms or signs of cognitive decline and high risk of these symptoms respectively.]

Clinical Neuroscience

NOVEMBER 30, 2016

[The role of zonisamide in the treatment of women with epilepsy]

JUHOS Vera

[The antiepileptic drugs can effect fertility, development of gynecological diseases and occurence of sexual problems. They can cause a number of “cosmetic” problem and also influence the selection of safe contraceptive method. Many antiepileptic drugs can cause congenital malformations or affect the new-born child’s psychomotor and cognitive development, therefore during pregnancy should be treated with extreme caution in women with epilepsy. Most types of epilepsies accompany the patient through their whole life. Women spend almost the third of their lives after menopause and - due to the formation of associated diseases as well - this period is also special. According to the 2013 recommendation of International League Epilepsy (ILAE), zonisamide is one of the first-line antiepileptic drugs in focal epilepsy. In my review I discuss women’s epilepsy in the viewpoint of the application of zonisamid. ]

Clinical Neuroscience

JULY 30, 2016

[The role of zonisamide in the management of pediatric partial epilepsy]

ROSDY Beáta, KOLLÁR Katalin, MÓSER Judit, MELLÁR Mónika

[In our review we discuss the group of approved antiepileptic drugs for children in Hungary. We cite the results of the review conducted by the International League Against Epilepsy on antiepileptic drug efficacy and effectiveness as initial monotherapy for newly diagnosed epileptic seizures and syndromes in pediatric age group. 25% of pediatric epilepsy is therapy resistant, so we further need new drugs, which must be investigated according to the rules of the European Medicine Agency. The ethical dilemmas of childhood drug studies lead to the situation that the new antiepileptic drugs, approved as monotherapy in adult epilepsies, are in the majority just in add-on regimen tested in pediatric patients. As clinicians we appreciate open label extension safety studies. An old-new antiepileptic drug in Europe is zonisamide. Though it was approved for first line monotherapy in pediatric and adult patients with partial and generalised epilepsy in 1989 in Japan, the European Medicine Agency licensed its use as adjunctive therapy in children aged 6 years or older with partial seizures (with or without secondary generalisation) just in 2013. The results of the openlabel extension study appeared in 2014. The mean dose received was 7.5 mg/kg/day. During the open label phase 11% of the patients achieved seizure freedom and it was maintained throughout the study. The drug was generally well tolerated. The most frequently reported treatment-related adverse events were decreased weight (6%), decreased appetite (4%), and headache (2%). No new or unexpected side effects emerged. In conclusion oral zonisamide as adjunctive therapy in pediatric patients aged 6-17 years with partial seizures demonstrated an acceptable safety and tolerability profile and efficacy over a period at least 1 year. So it is a good treatment option in this population.]

Clinical Neuroscience

MAY 30, 2015

[Zonisamide: one of the first-line antiepileptic drugs in focal epilepsy ]

JANSZKY József, HORVÁTH Réka, KOMOLY Sámuel

[Chronic administration of antiepileptic drugs without history of unprovoked epileptic seizures are not recommended for epilepsy prophylaxis. Conversely, if the patient suffered the first unprovoked seizure, then the presence of epileptiform discharges on the EEG, focal neurological signs, and the presence of epileptogenic lesion on the MRI are risk factors for a second seizure (such as for the development of epilepsy). Without these risk factors, the chance of a second seizure is about 25-30%, while the presence of these risk factors (for example signs of previous stroke, neurotrauma, or encephalitis on the MRI) can predict >70% seizure recurrence. Thus the International League Against Epilepsy (ILAE) re-defined the term ’epilepsy’ which can be diagnosed even after the first seizure, if the risk of seizure recurrence is high. According to this definition, we can start antiepileptic drug therapy after a single unprovoked seizure. There are four antiepileptic drugs which has the highest evidence (level „A”) as first-line initial monotherapy for treating newly diagnosed epilepsy. These are: carbamazepine, phenytoin, levetiracetam, and zonisamide (ZNS). The present review focuses on the ZNS. Beacuse ZNS can be administrated once a day, it is an optimal drug for maintaining patient’s compliance and for those patients who have a high risk for developing a non-compliance (for example teenagers and young adults). Due to the low interaction potential, ZNS treatment is safe and effective in treating epilepsy of elderly people. ZNS is an ideal drug in epilepsy accompanied by obesity, because ZNS has a weight loss effect, especially in obese patients.]

Clinical Neuroscience

NOVEMBER 30, 2009

[Role of zonisamid in treating epilepsy, Parkinson disorders and other neurological diseases]

JANSZKY József

[On the basis of six randomized controlled trials, zonisamide (ZNS) can be prescribed as add-on treatment in focal adulthood epilepsy in USA and Europe. In Japan, it can be prescribed as first-line monotherapy drug - independent of age. ZNS may also be effective in idiopathic generalized epilepsy and some difficult-to-treat epilepsies including West, Lennox-Gastaut, or Dravet syndromes. The most frequent side effects of ZNS are related to central nervous system occurring in 19%. Kidney stones and oligohidrosis are ZNS-specific side effects. Loss of appetite and weight are usually “beneficial” effects. ZNS is not recommended in pregnancy. ZNS can be taken once daily, which may be beneficial in non-compliance. The pathomechanism of ZNS is different from other antiepileptic drugs. ZNS has an effect on the voltage-gated Na+- and T-type Ca2+ channels as well as on the dopaminerg, glutamaterg, cholinerg, and GABAerg systems. The multiple way of action may be the reason why ZNS seems to be a broad-spectrum drug and beneficial in various neurological disorders. ZNS reduces production of free radicals according to in vitro and in vivo studies. Animal experiments suggest that ZNS may be a neuroprotective agent. Based on an adequate randomized controlled trial, ZNS is effective in adjuctive treatment of Parkinson disorder. A peculiar benefit of the ZNS is that parallel to its positive effect on motor impairment it also reduces severity of dyskinesias. ZNS may be effective in bipolar disorder, obesity, eating disorders, and migraine prophylaxis.]

Clinical Neuroscience

MAY 20, 2011

[Our clinical experience with zonisamide in resistant generalized epilepsy syndromes]

KELEMEN Anna, RÁSONYI György, NEUWIRTH Magdolna, BARCS Gábor, SZŰCS Anna, JAKUS Rita, FABÓ Dániel, JUHOS Vera, PÁLFY Beatrix, HALÁSZ Péter

[Purpose - Zonisamide is licensed in the European Union for adjunctive therapy for partial epilepsy, but its efficacy in generalized epilepsy was less explored. Methods - This prospective observational study included 47 patients (mean age 29 years, range 3-50) with different resistant generalized epilepsy syndromes: idiopathic generalized syndromes (IGE) 15 patients, (juvenile myoclonic epilepsy four, absence epilepsy four, myoclonic absence two, unclassified IGE five), progressive myoclonic epilepsy type 1 (PME1) four, severe myoclonic epilepsy of infancy (SMEI) three, borderline SMEI three, Lennox-Gastaut syndrome/secondary generalized epileptic encephalopties 23 patients. All patients were followed up for at least six months. The mean dose given was 367 mg/day (range 100-600 mg/day), the patients received at least one and no more than two concomitant AE. Response was defined as more than 50% seizure reduction or seizure freedom. Results - The best effect was achieved in PME one, all the patients were responders. Myoclonic seizures were reduced 80%, none of the patients had generalized tonic clonic (GTC) seizures. In two of the four patients all other antiepileptics were tapered of (including piracetam), so they were GTC seizure and almost myoclonia free on zonisamide only. Responder rates were in GEFS ± SME 62.5%, in resistant IGE 62.5%, and in epileptic encephalopathies 33.3% patients. Tolerance after initial efficacy developed in six patients. Adverse effects were mild: weight loss, somnolence and confusion were repeatedly reported. Three patients reported cognitive improvement. Conclusion - Clinical benefit of a broad spectrum antiepileptic zonisamide extends across seizure types, ages and epilepsy syndromes. The efficacy in PME proved to be excellent.]