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Lege Artis Medicinae

DECEMBER 10, 2019

[The adverse effects of smoking on our respiratory system based on data of the Hungarian Public Health Screening 2010-2018 ]

KÉKES Ede, DAIKI Tenno, DANKOVICS Gergely, BARNA István

[The regular smoking with or without clinical symptoms causes structural changes in the lung tissue and this is reflected in res­pi­ratory function tests. During the last 9 years of Hungary's comprehesive health promotion screening (MÁESZ) between 2010 and 2018, spiro­metric examinations (PEF, FEV1, MEF25-75, FVC) were performed on 70822 women and 60187 men. We used the percentage of predictive values in the analysis to describe the deviation from normal. The carbon monoxide (eCO) content measurement of the exhaled air (in ppm) was performed on 24899 women and 22340 men. The COPD Evaluation Ques­tionnaire (CAT) was completed by 4166 wo­men and 3170 men. All four parameters of spirometry showed lower values for smokers in both sexes, but in men they were lower than in women. Ageing lowered significantly the values. The rate of changes from normal predictive values and the difference between smokers and non-smokers was the highest for MEF25-75 and FVC. The expiratory CO content (eCO) was significantly higher in smokers than in non-smokers in all age groups. In smokers, the incidence in percent of abnormal CAT score was significantly higher. Respiratory screening tests reveal the harmful effects of smoking, even without clinical symptoms, and indicate the risk of developing COPD.]

Lege Artis Medicinae

DECEMBER 20, 2003

[EXERCISE-INDUCED BRONCHOCONSTRICTION]

VIZI Éva, CSOMA Zsuzsanna, HUSZÁR Éva

[Exercise-induced bronchoconstriction describes the transient narrowing of the airways occurring during and most often after vigorous exercise. The mechanism of exercise-induced bronchoconstriction remains elusive, although airway drying and cooling plays a prominent role. The severity of this reaction depends on the temperature and the water content of the inspired air, the type and concentration of air pollutants inspired and the intensity of the exercise. Diagnosis of exercise-induced bronchoconstriction should include baseline spirometry followed by an exercise challenge test. The exercise can be a free-running test or a laboratory based test using a cycle-ergometer or a treadmill. Pre- and post-exercise pulmonary function should be compared, 10%-15% postexercise fall in forced expiratory volume in 1 second (FEV1) is used as a diagnostic criteria (10% in laboratory test, 15% in free-running test). Heat loss, water loss, post exertional airway rewarming and the role of several mediators have been proposed as possible mechanisms responsible for the airway obstruction induced by exercise. Exercise-induced bronchoconstriction can be easily diagnosed and treated in the majority of patients. When properly treated, asthmatic individuals should be able to participate or compete in the majority of sports.]