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Clinical Neuroscience

JANUARY 30, 2021

Retinal morphological changes during the two years of follow-up in Parkinson’s disease

ATUM Mahmut, DEMIRYÜREK Enes Bekir

The study aims to investigate the relationship between the progression of idiopathic Parkinson’s disease (IPD) and retinal morphology. The study was carried out with 23 patients diagnosed with early-stage IPD (phases 1 and 2 of the Hoehn and Yahr scale) and 30 age-matched healthy controls. All patients were followed up at least two years, with 6-month intervals (initial, 6th month, 12th month, 18th month, and 24th month), and detailed neurological and ophthalmic examinations were performed at each follow-up. Unified Parkinson’s Disease Rating Scale part III (UPDRS Part III) scores, Hoehn and Yahr (H&Y) scores, best-corrected visual acuity (BCVA), intraocular pressure (IOP) measurement, central macular thickness (CMT) and retinal nerve fiber layer (RNFL) thickness were analyzed at each visit. The average age of the IPD and control groups was 43.96 ± 4.88 years, 44.53 ± 0.83 years, respectively. The mean duration of the disease in the IPD group was 7.48 ± 5.10 months at the start of the study (range 0-16). There was no statistically significant difference in BCVA and IOP values between the two groups during the two-year follow-up period (p> 0.05, p> 0.05, respectively). Average and superior quadrant RNFL thicknesses were statistically different between the two groups at 24 months and there was no significant difference between other visits (p=0.025, p=0.034, p> 0.05, respectively). There was no statistically significant difference in CMT between the two groups during the follow-up period (p> 0.05). Average and superior quadrant RNFL thicknesses were significantly thinning with the progression of IPD.

Hypertension and nephrology

OCTOBER 23, 2019

[Non-invasive evaluation of cardiovascular risk in pediatric chronic kidney disease patients]

BÁRCZI Adrienn, DÉGI Arianna Amália, KIS Éva, REUSZ György

[Cardiovascular diseases are the leading cause of mortality and morbidity in children with chronic kidney disease (CKD). Similar to adults, children with CKD experience a high burden of traditional and uremia-associated risk factors. Recent years, several studies were published in connection with cardiovascular risk factors, patomechanism, and early markers of cardiovascular diseases. Early signs of cardiomyopathy, such as left ventricular hypertrophy or dysfunction, and markers of atherosclerosis, such as increased intima-media thickness of the carotid artery or increased wall stiffness of the aorta are frequently present in early stages of CKD in children. As prevention is important in pediatrics, the evaluation of subtle changes of the cardiovascular system provide opportunity for early treatment and that enables children to develop normally and have a better long-term quality of life. Recently, newer non-invasive cardiovascular imaging modalities have been emerged to diagnose subclinical alterations of the heart and vessels in this specific population with kidney disease. In this review, we provide an overwiev of the emerging imaging techniques used to detect early subclinical organ damage in pediatric chronic kidney disease patients.]