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Lege Artis Medicinae

SEPTEMBER 10, 2019

[What may hurt the patient’s leg? Lower extremity ischaemia]

FENDRIK Krisztina, BIRÓ Katalin, KOLTAI Katalin, ENDREI Dóra, TÓTH Kálmán, KÉSMÁRKY Gábor

[Peripheral artery disease (PAD) is of high prevalence, and one of the most common clinical manifestations of the atherosclerosis beside ischaemic heart disease and cerebrovascular disease. PAD should be considered as a systemic disease, PAD patients have two times higher ten-year cardiovascular mortality than the normal population. For these reasons, the early recognition of the disease, the appropriate secondary preventive medical and non-medical therapy are of great importance. Risk stratification, proper physical examination, ankle pressure, ankle-brachial index, toe pressure, transcutaneous partial tissue oxygen pressure measurement and duplex ultrasound are the cornerstones to an early diagnosis. This summary aims at calling attention to the fact that lower extremity pain can not only be caused by musculo­sceletal diseases but limb and/or life-threatening limb ischaemia can be revealed in the background. ]

Lege Artis Medicinae

JULY 20, 2017

[Eosinophil granulomatous polyangiitis]

WITTMANN Zsófia, KARDOS Magdolna, FINTHA Attila, KERKOVITS Lóránt, AMBRUS Csaba

[Due to the high prevalence of kidney involvement, patients with systemic autoimmune disorders, also including small vessel vasculitides are frequently seen in neph-rology centers. Activated neutrophils attacking the wall of various blood vessel are key features in these diseases, leading to bleeding, occlusion, ischaemia and tissue necrosis. This latter finding is reflected in the term necrotising vasculitis. In this paper, we present a case of eosinophil ganulomatous polyangiitis (EGPA, formerly called Churg-Strauss syndrome), the least common form of ANCA associated small vessel vasculitides. We found it very interesting but not uncommon that our patient was admitted to the nephrology ward with vague symptoms that became more and more suggestive and typical for vasculitis during our observation, guiding us to the right diagnosis. Timely and appropriate immunosuppressive therapy based on immunology lab report and histology findings resulted in good response and remission of the disease in our patient. ]

Lege Artis Medicinae

JULY 20, 2012

[Use of a drug-eluting stent for the treatment of in-stent restenosis of the superior mesenteric artery]

P. SZABÓ Réka, PÉTER Mózes, VARGA István, VAJDA Gusztáv, HARANGI Mariann, MÁTYUS János, BALLA József

[INTRODUCTION - Diagnosis and treating intestinal ischaemia in time presents a great challenge for clinicians. CASE REPORT - In a 60-year-old woman on dialysis who presented with abdominal angina, angiography revealed stenosis of the superior mesenteric artery, which was treated by implantation of a 6×29 mm Genesis stent. After a year, her symptoms reoccurred and angiography revealed restenosis, which was treated with a 7×34 mm Wallstent, while her previous acetylsalicylic acid treatment was supplemented with clopidrogel. Nevertheless, her abdominal angina reoccurred again after a year. During the next intervention - because of the in-stent restenosis - a Taxus Liberte stent was implanted. During the dual antiplatelet therapy, her abdominal complaints did not reoccur, her body weight increased and angiography did not reveal restenosis in the affected artery even after 4 years. CONCLUSIONS - A drug-eluting stent can be a good choice in case of restenosis of the superior mesenteric artery. In a stented patient, it is crucial to use an appropriately controlled, long-term, dual antiplatelet therapy.]

Lege Artis Medicinae

MARCH 22, 2012

[Clinical aspects of ischaemic bowel disease]

DEMETER Pál

[Decreased blood flow through the intestines leads to mesenteric ischaemia, which is characterised by cellular damage due to the lack of oxygen and nutrients. Extensive collateralisation between splanchnic vessels serves as a protective mechanism against ischaemia. Intestinal ischaemia can be classified on the basis of its timing, location and the vessels involved. Acute mesenteric ischaemia can result from arterial embolisation, arterial or venous thrombosis, or vasoconstriction secondary to systemic circulation disorder associated with hypovolaemia. Chronic mesenteric ischaemia develops as a consequence of partial or complete occlusion of splanchnic vessels. Colonic ischaemia is mainly caused by a limited circulation disorder of the inferior mesenteric artery. Mortality rates for the various forms of acute mesenteric ischaemia are different. However, early diagnosis before bowel infarction might improve survival. This paper summarises the cilical aspects, diagnosis and therapeutic options of intestinal ischaemia.]

Hypertension and nephrology

JUNE 10, 2011

[Postconditioning in major vascular operations for the prevention of postoperative renal complications]

ARÁNYI Péter, TURÓCZI Zsolt, GARBAISZ Dávid, VARGA Márk, LOTZ Gábor, KUPCSULIK Péter, SZIJÁRTÓ Attila

[Objectives: During vascular surgeries on the abdominal aorta, lower extremities suffer ischaemia-reperfusion (IR) injury which can lead to rhabdomyolysis. A severe complication is the myonephropathic metabolic syndrome with acute renal failure. The aim of the study was to investigate whether postconditioning (rapid repetitive cycles of ischaemia and reperfusion on the onset of the organ reperfusion, a novel technique to reduce ischaemia-reperfusion injuries) could prevent renal failure in major vascular surgery. Subjects and methods: Male Wistar-rats underwent 180 minutes of bilateral lower limb ischaemia and four hours of reperfusion. Postconditioning consisted of 6 cycles of 10-second aortic occlusion/10-second declamping. Microcirculation of the kidney was detected with laser Doppler flowmeter. After 4, 24, 72 hours of reperfusion serum, urine, and histological samples were collected. Acid-base state was evaluated immediately after reperfusion. Results: After four hours of reperfusion there were no significant histological alterations in the muscle in contrast to the 24 hour rhabdomyolysis with inflammation. CK, LDH, AST levels increased in the acute phase but improved in the 24th and 72nd postoperative hours. Kidney histology and laboratory tests showed definite signs of acute tubular injury in control animals. In the early stage serum creatinine; seBUN/creatinin; FENa showed significantly (p<0.05) lower kidney injury in the postconditioned group. Postconditioning improved the kidney cortex microcirculation. Conclusion: Postconditioning can reduce the prevalence and consequences of renal failure after experimental major vascular surgery in rats.]

Lege Artis Medicinae

SEPTEMBER 21, 2009

[Up-to-date management of systemic sclerosis]

SZŰCS Gabriella

[Systemic sclerosis is a chronic autoimmune disease characterized by three major features: widespread fibrosis in the skin and internal organs, a non-inflammatory small vessel obliterative vasculopathy and immunological activation with disease-specific autoantibodies. It is necessary to take a systematic approach to the diagnosis and evaluation of each case in order to provide appropriate treatment. Disease-modifying approaches can be classified according to the underlying pathogenic process. Thus vascular therapies include agents used for Raynaud’s phenomenon, critical digital ischaemia and organ-based vascular complications such as scleroderma renal crisis and pulmonary hypertension. Immunosuppressive drugs are used in lung involvement or rapid skin progression. The results of different anti-fibrotic therapies are controversial. Finally in managing organ-based manifestations and complications a multidisciplinary approach to the therapy is useful with patient education as an integral component of successful management.]

Lege Artis Medicinae

NOVEMBER 30, 2006

[THE ROLE OF METABOLIC THERAPY IN THE TREATMENT OF STABLE RECURRENT ANGINA AFTER CORONARY REVASCULARIZATION]

TÓTH Csaba

[Current guidelines recommend drug treatment as firstline therapy for stable angina. If adequate symptom relief cannot be achieved with pharmacological management, or if myocardial ischaemia progresses, interventional revascularization procedures should be considered. Based on current guidelines, this should be either coronary artery bypass grafting or percutaneous coronary intervention. Recurrent angina refers to the persistence or reemergence of angina symptoms after a coronary revascularization procedure. This clinical situation indicates the repeat of coronarography as soon as possible. The repeated coronarography, however, often will not confirm progression or restenosis. The pathology of this clinical form of recurrent angina is not exactly known. As symptoms are frequently seen in the absence of abnormal coronary blood flow, vasodilator drugs are of limited effectiveness in recurrent angina. For this reason new, non-haemodynamic treatment approaches have been suggested. Among these, agents that help optimise cardiac metabolism are of particular interest. Trimetazidine acts on the energy metabolism of myocardial cells by reducing the reliance of myocardial metabolism on fatty acid oxidation and lifting the feedback inhibition of the glucose oxidation pathway. Moreover, trimetazidine reduces intracellular acidosis. These beneficial effects on cellular processes make trimetazidine the first representative of cardioprotective drugs. In randomized, placebo-controlled clinical trials on patients after revascularization, trimetazidine significantly reduced the number of angina episodes, decreased the ECG signs and the levels of biochemical markers of myocardial ischaemia, and improved exercise test parameters compared to placebo. The spectrum of benefits of this drug in stable angina ranges from decreasing the need for surgical intervention to improving the outcome and diminishing the symptoms of angina pectoris following revascularization.]

Clinical Neuroscience

JANUARY 20, 2005

[EXAMINATION OF NATURAL COAGULATION INHIBITOR PROTEINS IN THE ACUTE PHASE OF ISCHAEMIC ST]

OLÁH László, CSÉPÁNY Tünde, BERECZKY Zsuzsanna, KERÉNYI Adrienne, MISZ Mária, KAPPELMAYER János, CSIBA László

[Introduction - Decreased activity of natural anticoagulants (antithrombin-III, protein C, protein S) rarely causes cerebral ischaemia, however it can be found frequently in acute phase of ischaemic stroke. The authors’ aim was to investigate whether the decreased activity of natural anticoagulants is accompanied by worsening of symptoms in ischaemic stroke. Patients and method - Sixty-eight acute ischaemic stroke patients were investigated. Severity of symptoms were assessed and followed by the NIH Stroke Scale. Antithrombin- III, protein C, protein S activities, and concentration of C-reactive protein (CRP) were measured within 48 hours after onset of ischaemic stroke. Results - Progressing stroke was found in 29% of patients. Decreased activity of at least one natural anticoagulant proteins was present in 31% of patients. Progression of stroke symptoms occured in 76% of patients with decreased natural anticoagulant activity, while this proportion was only 9% in those with normal natural coagulation inhibitor protein activity (p<0.01). Progressing stroke was also more frequent in patients with elevated CRP value (60%) than in those with normal CRP level (11%; p<0.05). Decreased activity of natural anticoagulants was more frequent in patients with elevated CRP concentration compared with patients with normal CRP. Conclusion - The results demonstrate the importance of decreased activity of natural anticoagulants in acute phase of ischaemic stroke. This abnormality was present in about 1/3 of stroke patients. The decreased activity of natural coagulant inhibitor proteins may play an important role in development of progressing stroke thus indicating unfavourable outcome.]

Lege Artis Medicinae

APRIL 21, 2004

[THE IMPORTANCE OF HYPERTENSION IN CEREBROVASCULAR DISEASES]

SZAPÁRY László

[Stroke is a highly prevalent disorder worldwide; it is the third main cause of death and the leading cause of severe disability. Recent data showed that 72-86% of cerebrovascular disorders are of ischaemic type. Arterial hypertension is the most prevalent risk factor for both haemorrhagic and ischaemic stroke, it is present in approximately 70% of cases. All forms of hypertension, isolated systolic or diastolic and combined hypertension increase stroke risk about 3-4 times and the relationship with systolic blood pressure may even be stronger than with diastolic blood pressure. Hypertension is very common after acute stroke. In this phase the cerebral autoregulation is disturbed in the region of focal brain ischaemia or haemorrhage such that cerebral blood flow is directly dependent on systemic blood pressure. It is therefore essential to avoid systemic hypotension in acute stroke patients and the reduction of high blood pressure may lower cerebral blood flow in the ischemic penumbra. Evidence from clinical data shows that control of blood pressure leads to lower risk of first or reccurent stroke and patients have shown beneficial effects especially of ACE inhibitors and diuretics. In the PROGRESS study both hypertensive and non-hypertensive cerebrovascular patients benefited from antihypertensive therapy. Previous results suggests that there may be additional beneficial effects of the ACEinhibitor therapy not related to blood pressure lowering in the prevention of stroke.]

Clinical Neuroscience

MARCH 15, 2004

[Neuroprotection in brain ischemia - doubts and hopes]

ZÁDOR Zsolt, BENYÓ Zoltán, LACZA Zsombor, HORTOBÁGYI Tibor, HARKÁNY Tibor

[In ischaemic stroke the two major potential therapeutic strategies are aimed at either improving cerebral blood flow or directly interacting with the cytotoxic cascade - a large body of evidence gained from animal studies is in support of them. In clinical trials direct neuroprotection by blocking the neurotoxic cascade remained ineffective, although there are several clinical trials still in progress. We summarize the experimental data and present the results of clinical trials and also discuss why so many drugs, which were effective in animal studies, failed in human trials. It is emphasized, that 1. in most animal studies the reduction of infarct size, i.e. the amount of saved penumbral tissue, was the outcome measure, whereas neurological function remained unassessed; 2. the recovery of intellectual performance and higher cortical functions are of major importance in the future quality of life in stroke victims; however, it is impossible to examine these parameters appropriately in animal studies; 3. in many clinical trials the patient population was rather heterogenous and low in number, the study protocol was not optimal and the critical analysis of the subacute and chronic phase was lacking or insufficient. We present the major experimental stroke models, discuss their similarities, differencies and limitations as compared to the human pathophysiological processes. The pitfalls of extrapolating data from animal studies to clinical practice are also summarized. The complex network of functional and morphological intercellular connections, the long timescale of neurotoxic and reparative events and the lessons learned from clinical trials suggest, that the use of drug combinations (therapeutic cocktails) targeting multiple steps of the neurotoxic cascade would hopefully result in more effective treatment of ischaemic stroke. Strategies to facilitate brain plasticity and regeneration is an additional promising tool to enhance recovery in brain ischaemia.]