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Clinical Neuroscience

JULY 30, 2020

[Advanced Parkinson’s disease characteristics in clinical practice: Results from the OBSERVE-PD study and sub-analysis of the Hungarian data]

TAKÁTS Annamária, ASCHERMANN Zsuzsanna, VÉCSEI László, KLIVÉNYI Péter, DÉZSI Lívia, ZÁDORI Dénes, VALIKOVICS Attila, VARANNAI Lajos, ONUK Koray, KINCZEL Beatrix, KOVÁCS Norbert

[The majority of patients with advanced Parkinson’s disease are treated at specialized movement disorder centers. Currently, there is no clear consensus on how to define the stages of Parkinson’s disease; the proportion of Parkinson’s patients with advanced Parkinson’s disease, the referral process, and the clinical features used to characterize advanced Parkinson’s disease are not well delineated. The primary objective of this observational study was to evaluate the proportion of Parkinson’s patients identified as advanced patients according to physician’s judgment in all participating movement disorder centers across the study. Here we evaluate the Hungarian subset of the participating patients. The study was conducted in a cross-sectional, non-interventional, multi-country, multi-center format in 18 countries. Data were collected during a single patient visit. Current Parkinson’s disease status was assessed with Unified Parkinson’s Disease Rating Scale (UPDRS) parts II, III, IV, and V (modified Hoehn and Yahr staging). Non-motor symptoms were assessed using the PD Non-motor Symptoms Scale (NMSS); quality of life was assessed with the PD 8-item Quality-of-Life Questionnaire (PDQ-8). Parkinson’s disease was classified as advanced versus non-advanced based on physician assessment and on questions developed by the Delphi method. Overall, 2627 patients with Parkinson’s disease from 126 sites were documented. In Hungary, 100 patients with Parkinson’s disease were documented in four movement disorder centers, and, according to the physician assessment, 50% of these patients had advanced Parkinson’s disease. Their mean scores showed significantly higher impairment in those with, versus without advanced Parkinson’s disease: UPDRS II (14.1 vs. 9.2), UPDRS IV Q32 (1.1 vs. 0.0) and Q39 (1.1 vs. 0.5), UPDRS V (2.8 vs. 2.0) and PDQ-8 (29.1 vs. 18.9). Physicians in Hungarian movement disorder centers assessed that half of the Parkinson’s patients had advanced disease, with worse motor and non-motor symptom severity and worse QoL than those without advanced Parkinson’s disease. Despite being classified as eligible for invasive/device-aided treatment, that treatment had not been initiated in 25% of these patients.]

Lege Artis Medicinae

OCTOBER 20, 2019

[Medical therapy of peripherial artery disease]

BENCZÚR Béla

[Care of PAD (peripherial arterial disease) is one of the most negligent area of cardiovascular diseases: on one hand patients suffering from PAD are the most uncared, less educated and health-minded population (it’s enough to keep in mind the high rate of smoking and alcohol-abuse among them) in addition the number of angiologists is insufficient for the treatment of PAD. Although detection of PAD would be easy as a widely applicable, cheap screening method, the ankle-brachial index is available which is an obligatory screening investigation in general care. Therapeutic options are better and better since cilostazol was launched we have an evidence-based treatment which can solve the symptoms, slower the progression which is strongly recommended (IA recommendation) in both American and Hungarian guidelines. Cilostazol, a PDE3-inhibitor has complex pharmacological effect but contraindicated in several clinical conditions as pentoxiphylline is not totally excluded from the therapeutic arsenal of PAD. The place of antiplatelet agents is well-defined in the most recent European guidelines in the treatment of PAD. The jumping development of interventional radiology beyond medical therapy contributed a lot to prevent limb amputations in the case of early detection of PAD. ]

Journal of Nursing Theory and Practice

DECEMBER 30, 2018

[Pulse Wave Velocity measurement among university students ]

KALMÁR Ágota, PÓSA Gabriella, FINTA Regina, NAGY Edit, SZILÁGYI Levente

[The aim of the study: The purpose of our investigation is to prove the favorable effect of regular physical activity on arteries. Material and method: 42 students (29 women; 13 men; age 24 ±2,71 years) volunteered for our research. Anthropometric data, segmental-, visceral body composition (TanitaSBCA) and arterial stiffness parameters (Arteriograph) were measured. Participants took part in an 8-week training. Interventional-group: started training during our research, control-group: doing sports constantly for years. Results: Compared to the age decadal artertial pulse wave velocity (PWVao) reference value both groups showed significant difference. PWVao significantly improved because of training by the interventional group (6,23±0,79; 5,87±0,59 p<0,01); while in the case of the control group there was no significant change (5,85±0,54; 5,87±0,63 p=0,80). The body composition data showed minimal correlation with PWVao. Conculsion: Regular training has favorable effect on one stiffness parameter of arteries. Already 8 weeks enough to reach significant change to reduce arterial stiffness and this condition can be maintained with long-term regular training.]

Clinical Neuroscience

JANUARY 30, 2019

[The effect of palliative neural therapy on the improvement of chronic pain]

MOLNÁR István, HEGYI Gabriella, KOVÁCS Zoltán, KAPÓCS Gábor, SZŐKE Henrik

[Objective - To assess the extent to which pain therapy can improve chronic pain in a heterogeneous group of patients, its impact on their quality of life and the correlation of the changes with their age and the underlying disease. The investigation has its actuality by its impact on public health. Methods - a prospective, non-randomized, interventional, clinical cohort study was conducted under real-life conditions in a general pain clinic, which lasted for 6 months. Changes in pain intensity (VAS) and related quality of life changes (SF-36 HRQoL) were measured using validated internationally accepted questionnaires. The questionnaires were filled out by all patients on their own, so they provided information of self-esteem on their own. All patient post-treatment results were compared to pre-treatment results. The general quality of life changes found in our patients were compared to the representative norms of healthy population in Hungary. Subjects - patients participated voluntarily at their own decision in the survey. The underlying disease of chronic pain, age and gender of the patients did not limit the inclusion into the study. Results - Data of 231 patients were evaluated. After pain therapy, the decrease in intensity of pain was confirmed by VAS at p=0.002. This was linked to a quality of life change that has been shown to be p=0.003 for men, with p=0.002 in women with SF-36 HRQoL. Based on the correlation coefficients, the changes in quality of life improved regardless of the age of the patients and the nature of the underlying conditions causing the pain. Conclusions - Although analgesia is basicly a symptomatic therapy, our findings suggest that the reduction of pain improves the quality of life of patients independently from their, and the curability of the underlying and accompanying diseases. ]

Clinical Neuroscience

NOVEMBER 30, 2018

[Effects of neural therapy on quality of live in patients with inoperable lower extremity artery disease ]

MOLNÁR István, DEÁK Botond Zsolt, HEGYI Gabriella, KOVÁCS Zoltán, KAPÓCS Gábor, SZŐKE Henrik

[Objectives - Our aim was to evaluate the effects of percutaneous neurolysis of lumbal sympathetic ganglions on pain and the resulting changes in quality of life with validated objective and subjective methods. To follow the adverse effects and complications of the procedure. Materials and methods - A prospective, non-randomized, interventional, clinical cohort study under real life conditons was conducted. The time of the observation was 6 months. Palliative neural therapy was performed to reduce the ischemic pain of the affected leg of the patients involved in the study. Prior to treatment and after 35 days, Visual Analogue Scale (VAS) was used to measure the intensity of lower limb pain. The related changes in the quality of life were followed by a general 36-Item Short-Form Health Survey (SF-36) questionnaire. We measured the changes of the patients’ skin temperature and ankle/arm index. The post-treatment results were compared to the pre-treatment results. We compared the results of objective and subjective measures. We followed the side effects and complications of the pain therapy. Each of the examined subjects had obliterative (Fontaine II/b stage) arterial disease of the lower limbs, in which no revascularization intervention was feasible and their ischemic pain was of VAS≥7. Results - Data of 124 patients (69 male, 55 female) could be evaluated. The decrease in intensity of limb pain in the post-treatment period was significant (p=0.001). Quality of life also indicated a significant improvement (p=0.004). Changes in skin temperature and ankle/arm index demonstrated significant improvement (p≤0.005): skin temperature increased from 27.6°C to 31.2°C, the ankle/arm index inceased from 0.67 to 0.83 on average. Changes in objective and subjective measures correlated with each other. No worthening of symptoms, serious adverse events or complications were observed. Conclusion - The chemical denervation of the lumbar sympathetic ganglions with percutaneous application is a minimally invasive intervention, useful in outpatient care, which can be well tolerated by the patient without any significant side effect or complication. Its hyperaemic effect and the pain reduction of the leg can improve the quality of life of the patients.]

Hypertension and nephrology

FEBRUARY 20, 2018

[Experience with mycophenolate mofetil containing immunosuppressive regimen in de novo kidney transplant recipients (ORANGE study).]

WAGNER László, KALMÁR-NAGY Károly, TORONYI Éva, TÖRÖK Szilárd, PATONAI Attila, SZAKÁLY Péter

[Mycophenolate mofetil (MMF) has been used as an immunosuppressive agent in renal transplant recipients for more than two decades. The aim of the ORANGE study was to collect data with respect to the efficacy and safety of MMF containing immunosuppressive regimens during standard nephrology care in Hungarian clinical centres. Efficacy of the therapy was primarily evaluated via moni - toring of renal function based on glomerular filtration rate (GFR) values calculated on the basis of the MDRD-175 formula. A total number of 128 patients were en rolled in two clinical centres within the frames of an open-label, non-interventional study. During the course of the study, mean GFR values showed stable renal function between the 1st month (53.5±33.4 ml/min/1,73 m2) and the 12th month (58±16.3 ml/min/1,73 m2). Acute graft rejection occurred in 21 patients during the first month, further, 1-1 rejection was documented in the remaining period between 2-6 and 6-12 months after renal transplantation, respectively. The graft survival was 100% 1 month after renal transplantation, while this ratio was calculated to be 98.4% after 12 months.]

Hypertension and nephrology

MAY 20, 2017

[Cilostazol is effective and safe option for the treatment of intermittent claudication. Results of the NOCLAUD study]

FARKAS Katalin, JÁRAI Zoltán, KOLOSSVÁRY Endre

[Intermittent claudication can seriously impair the patients’ quality of life. Cilostazol was registered in Hungary in 2014. This study aimed to evaluate the efficacy and safety of cilostazol in patients with intermittent claudication. 1405 patients were enrolled to the 6 months, multicenter, non-interventional trial. From the 1331 patients, who completed the study, the data of 674 patients were subjected to efficacy analysis. Pain free and maximal walking distance and the 6 minute walking test improved significantly at 3 months (78.65%, 65.23%, 56.09%; respectively, p<0.001), and a further increase was observed after 6 months treatment (129.74%, 107.2, 80.38% respectively, p<0.001). Adverse events occured in 7.26% of the patients. The most frequent adverse events were headache, diarrhea, dizziness, tachycardia or palpitation. 24 patients (1.7%) stopped cilostazol treatment because of side effects. 6 month cilostazol treatment significantly increased the walking distance in patients with intermittent claudication, without important safety problems.]

JUNE 20, 2017

Cilostazol is effective and safe option for the treatment of intermittent claudication. Results of the NOCLAUD study

FARKAS Katalin, JÁRAI Zoltán, KOLOSSVÁRY Endre

Intermittent claudication can seriously impair the patients’ quality of life. Cilostazol was registered in Hungary in 2014. This study aimed to evaluate the efficacy and safety of cilostazol in patients with intermittent claudication. 1405 patients were enrolled to the 6 months, multicenter, non-interventional trial. From the 1331 patients, who completed the study, the data of 674 patients were subjected to efficacy analysis. Pain free and maximal walking distance and the 6 minute walking test improved significantly at 3 months (78.65%, 65.23%, 56.09%; respectively, p<0.001), and a further increase was observed after 6 months treatment (129.74%, 107.2, 80.38% respectively, p<0.001). Adverse events occured in 7.26% of the patients. The most frequent adverse events were headache, diarrhea, dizziness, tachycardia or palpitation. 24 patients (1.7%) stopped cilostazol treatment because of side effects. 6 month cilostazol treatment significantly increased the walking distance in patients with intermittent claudication, without important safety problems.

Clinical Oncology

MAY 20, 2016

[Non-surgical treatment of the biliary tract and gallbladder cancer]

PIKÓ Béla, LACZÓ Ibolya

[Biliary tract cancers are rare, hence only a few high level of evidences related to their treatment are available. The successful treatment and the only chance for long-term survival are based on the radical surgical resection. After the fl uoropyrimidin based protocols chemotherapy regimens prefer gemcitabine combinations (cisplatin, oxaliplatin, capecitabine) or FOLFIRINOX, considering the patient performance status as well. There are no registered targeted therapy in this indication, the most experiences were acquired with erlotinib; nowadays the optimal treatment can be selected by the molecular genetic profi le of the tumour and not by the results of the clinical studies. The radiotherapy and the radiochemotherapy can be administered preoperatively, postoperatively and for palliation as well, in addition to the conventional percutaneous radiotherapy, brachytherapy, intensity-modulated radiotherapy, intraoperative irradiation, radioembolization can also be administered depending on the technical equipments. Besides the photodynamic therapy and several ablation therapies, even interventional radiological procedures can play a signifi cant role.]

Clinical Oncology

DECEMBER 10, 2015

[Non surgical treatment of urinary bladder cancer]

PIKÓ Béla, LACZÓ Ibolya

[According to our present knowledge the surgical intervention in the treatment of bladder cancer is essential, but some non-surgical treatment methods play an indispensable role as well. Super- fi cial (non-muscle-invasive) form of bladder cancer can be treated by intravesical chemotherapy or BCG instillation, radiotherapy; the muscle-invasive forms of this tumour (≥pT2a) need neoadjuvant, adjuvant chemotherapy, radiotherapy or radio-chemotherapy. In case of metastatic disease (or locally advanced, recurrent disease) the treatment regimen consist of chemotherapy (given as fi rst line or second line), palliative radiotherapy, interventional methods, radio-isotope therapy and symptoms relief drugs. We present each of the therapeutic modalities and their indications category based on the ESMO and NCCN guidelines.]