Search results

Lege Artis Medicinae

SEPTEMBER 30, 2020

[How can the specialists be contacted? Ways of communication in the specialist-patient consultation]

MOLNÁR Regina, PAULIK Edit, SÁGI Zoltán, KÖVES Béla

[Consulting the specia­list means face-to-face meetings traditionally. Nowadays patients do not need to go to the outpatient clinic to see the doctor since many new communication options have already been available. The aim of our study was to explore how typically doctors and patients use other options (as phone call or e-mail) beside face-to-face appointments in the outpatient clinic. We conducted a focus group interview with specialists and health workers and an in-depth interview with the chief nurse of an outpatient clinic in Budapest. The specialist-patient consultation is mostly face-to-face in the specialist’s office in the presence of the nurse, whose role is complex and pivotal. Fur­ther­more, the landline phone is an essential device, as the patients can reach the specialist or nurse in their office hours. The application of e-mail or mobile phone is incidental. The website of the outpatient clinic provides practical information to patients. Traditional postal letters, leaflets, and publications are also typical for providing information. The doctors’ opinion was rather heterogeneous about the pa­tients’ Internet usage and about the on­line contact with patients. Beside increasing the capacities the deliberate and organized introduction and application of technical de­vices, may reduce the overburdening of health professionals.]

Lege Artis Medicinae

JANUARY 20, 2020

[End of the line? Addenda to the health and social care career of psychiatric patients living in Hungary’s asylums]

KAPÓCS Gábor, BACSÁK Dániel

[The authors are focusing on a special type of long term psychiatric care taking place in Hungary outside of the conventional mental health care system, by introducing some institutional aspects of the not well known world of so called social homes for psychiatric patients (asylums). After reviewing several caracteristics of institutional development of psychiatric care in Hun­gary based on selected Hungarian and in­ternational historical sources, the main struc­tural data of present Hungarian institutional capacities of psychiatric health and social care services are shown. Finally, the authors based on own personal experiences describe several functional ascpects of the largest existing asylum in EU, a so­cial home for long term care of psychiatric pa­tients. By the beginning of the 20th century, Hungarian psychiatric institutions were operating on an infrastructure of three large mental hospitals standing alone and several psychiatric wards incorporated into hospitals. Nevertheless, at the very first session of the Psychiatrists’ Conference held in 1900 many professionals gave warning: mental institutions were overcrowded and the quality of care provided in psychiatric hospital wards, many of which located in the countryside of Hungary, in most cases was far from what would have been professionally acceptable. The solution was seen in the building of new independent mental hospitals and the introduction of a family nursing institution already established in Western Europe; only the latter measure was implemented in the first half of the 20th century but with great success. However, as a result of the socio-political-economic-ideological turn following the Second World War, the institution of family nursing was dismantled while different types of psychiatric care facilities were developed, such as institutionalised hospital and outpatient care. In the meantime, a new type of institution emerged in the 1950s: the social home for psychiatric pa­tients, which provided care for approximately the same number of chronic psychiatric patients nationwide as the number of functioning hospital beds for acute psychiatric patients. This have not changed significantly since, while so­cial homes for psychiatric patients are perhaps less visible to the professional and lay public nowadays, altough their operational conditions are deteriorating of late years. Data show, that for historical reasons the current sys­tem of inpatient psychiatric care is proportionately arranged between health care and social care institutions; each covering one third. Further research is needed to fully explore and understand the current challenges that the system of psychiatric care social- and health care institu­tions are facing. An in-depth analysis would significantly contribute to the comprehensive improvement of the quality of services and the quality of lives of patients, their relatives and the health- and social care professionals who support them. ]

Clinical Neuroscience

SEPTEMBER 30, 2019

Role of positioning between trunk and pelvis in locomotor function of ambulant children with and without cerebral palsy

SANZ-MENGIBAR Manuel Jose, SANTONJA-MEDINA Fernando

Purpose - To understand if children with and without cerebral palsy share the same lumbar postural control threshold on the sagittal plane for the transition between each walking locomotor stage. Method - Observational analysis of sagittal trunk-pelvis kinematics of 97 children with cerebral palsy and 73 with typical development, according to their locomotor stage. Results - Among children with typical development, all average and minimum measurements of the sagittal lumbar curve during the gait events were correlated with age and the locomotor stages of development. Among children with cerebral palsy, there were significant correlations between all average and minimum values of the sagittal lumbar curve and locomotor stages of development but not age. Conclusions - We conclude that, for the same locomotor level, there are no common postural patterns between children with typical development and those with spastic bilateral cerebral palsy for the position between trunk and pelvis in the sagittal plane. Maximal lordosis reduction between trunk and pelvis may change with age or even training, but does not make a positive effect on the locomotor level, while basal and maintenance capacities could explain locomotor function. Trials that failed to assess quality of movement may now have a better understanding of how different interventions improve posture towards the next functional level.

Lege Artis Medicinae

JUNE 20, 2016

[Current topics in modern health informatics]

LAKNER Géza

[Development in technology - significant improvement in calculatory and storage capacities of computers - enable such calculation- and data-intensive applications, which were merely theoretical possibilities, even just a decade ago. Selected fields and methods of medical informatics are discussed in the article. Informatics methods became by now essential to biomedical research, drug discovery and development, and healthcare. Furthermore, the article presents a modern mobile information source application, developed in Hungary, which is aimed at supporting the activities and know-how of professionals in drug development and clinical research.]

Lege Artis Medicinae

JUNE 01, 2015

[Analysis of long term care of elderly people in residential social institutions ]

HORVÁTH Zoltán, ENDREI Dóra, MOLICS Bálint, ÁGOSTON István, BONCZ Imre

[OBJECTIVES - The aim of our study is to analyse the institutional long term social care of elderly in Hungary. DATA AND METHODS - Data were derived from the following sources: Social Sector Information System, Regional Development and Planning Information System, and the Hungarian Central Statistical Office. The analysis covered the period 2001-2012. We analysed the number of operating beds in residential social institutions (pieces) and number of residents (clients) in residential social institutions. RESULTS - Between 2001-2012 the number of available operating beds in residential social institutions increased by 28.56%, from 42658 to 54840. The number of residents (clients) in residential social institutions increased between 2001-2005 by 3% annually, while since 2007 the rate of growth decreased due to the capacity regulation. The bed occupancy rate was 97.51% in 2001, and then between 2002 and 2007 it stabilized between 96.26%-96.87%. In 2008 it decreased to 93.44%, then after a continuous increase it exceeded the 95%. CONCLUSIONS - During the survey period, the bed capacities and the number of clients in residential social institutions showed an increasing tendency under high occupancy rate.]

Hypertension and nephrology

FEBRUARY 20, 2014

[The beginnings and difficulties of peritoneal dialysis at the end of the last century. Part II. Hungarian experiences]

KARÁTSON András

[In Part I, I summarised the beginnings, the theoretical background and the international experiences of peritoneal dialysis. Hungarian publications related to peritoneal dialysis in the 1950s were focusing on the role of the method in the treatment of chronic renal disorders. The first dialysis centres were established in the medical universities of Hungary (Szeged in 1955, Budapest in 1960, Pécs in 1964, Debrecen in 1970) and in Miskolc in 1968. Despite the restricted hemodialysis capacities the intermittent technique of peritoneal dialysis did not spread in accordance with the demand. A survey conducted at the beginning of the 1970’s in the territory of the five counties with 1.5 million inhabitants revealed that considering the numbers of patients with renal diseases requiring dialysis, developing of a network of care and increasing the dialysis capacities is necessary and so is the development of a system of szatellite peritoneal dialysis, which was implemented with our support in 10 units of the county hospitals. A devoted and enthusiastic organiser of the nation-wide system of peritoneal dialysis was professor Taraba, who, due to his untimely death, was deprived of seeing the nation-wide spread of CAPD. At the beginning of the 1980’s the first reports on the favourable effects of CAPD appeared in Hungary. Solutions prepared in pharmacies and the lack of up-to-date equipment resulted in the frequent occurrence of peritonitis. In addition, the unfavourable memories of dialysis performed with bottled solutions (long treatment times, frequently peritonitis) were still vivid among patients and colleagues supervising the treatment. As a consequence, our survey conducted in 1991 revealed that the spread of CAPD all over the world in Hungary resulted in a significant increase of those treated with the intermittent method (more than 10% of the dialysis patients), while those treated with CAPD remained under 2%. Several reports on CAPD and the consequences that followed from them as well as the further training organised in the Szent Margit Hospital, Budapest and in Gánt, and also the guidelines issued by the Society of Hungarian Nephrologists the number of those treated with dialysis has exceeded 6000 in the past decade. 10% of them received CAPD/APD treatment.]

Lege Artis Medicinae

MARCH 20, 2014

[Crucial points in the therapy of hepatitis C]

MAKARA Mihály, HUNYADY Béla

[The first generation of direct acting antivirals represented a milestone in the therapy of hepatitis C but other breakthroughs are on the way with imminent authorization of new antiviral drugs and interferon-free combinations. The prices of these new agents necessitate the rational use of limited financial capacities: relatively cheaper interferon-based treatments could be used first for those who can be cured with these combinations, while the most expensive treatments are to be reserved for those with no other options. In the future, interferonfree regimens will likely be used first in those patients who did not respond to firstgeneration interferon-based regimens and in whom interferon therapy is contraindicated. To avoid complications of the disease, currently it is reasonable to treat all eligible patients with advanced fibrosis, particularly those with compensated cirrhosis, with interferon-based treatments. In some instances other medical or social conditions warrant prompt treatment. The triage of treatments is based on the Priority Index in Hungary. Current triple therapies with protease inhibitors are complicated by drug and food interactions as well as by frequent (sometimes severe) side effects. General practitioners and other specialists need to be involved in managing these issues. It is of utmost importance to refer patients to hepatology care before decompensation or development of hepatocellular carcinoma. The key of timely and accurate diagnosis is organized anti-HCV screening in populations at risk and in the age group with the highest prevalence.]

JANUARY 17, 2013

Evolutionary origins of Theory of Mind

Interview with Prof Laurie Santos about her lecture held at Budapest CEU Conference on Cognitive Development 2013.

Clinical Neuroscience

NOVEMBER 30, 2011

[The carrier model of neurology in Hungary: a proposal for the solution until 2020]

BERECZKI Dániel, CSIBA László, KOMOLY Sámuel, VÉCSEI László, AJTAY András

[Based on our previous survey on the capacities of neurological services and on the predictable changes in the neurologist workforce in Hungary, we present a proposal for the organization of the structure of neurological services in the future. We discuss the diagnostic groups treated by neurologists, the neurological services and their progressive organization. Using the current capacities as baseline, we propose patient groups to be treated by neurologists in the future, and the levels of services. Based on the tendencies seen in the last years we suggest to consider to allocate acute stroke services exclusively to stroke units in neurological departments, and we identify a few other diagnostic groups where neurology should have a larger share in patient care. We define three levels for inpatient care: university departments, regional/county hospitals, city hospitals. Instead of minimum criteria we assign outpatient and inpatient standards that are functional from the economic point of view as well. University departments cover all areas of neurological services, have a function in graduate and postgraduate training, and on a regional basis they participate in professional quality assurance activities at the county and city hospital levels, and would have a more independent role in residency training. As far as patient care is concerned, the task of the regional/county hospitals would be similar to that of university departments - without the exclusively university functions. A general neurological service would be offered at the city hospital level - the representation of all subspecialties of neurology is not required. Neurorehabilitation would be organized at special units of neurological wards at the city hospital level, at independent neurorehabilitation wards in regional/county hospitals, and also as an outpatient service offered at the patients’ home. The most significant organizational change would affect the outpatient neurological services. In addition to the special outpatient units associated with university departments and regional/county hospitals, the general neurological outpatient services would be organized as private practices, similarly to the current system of general practitioners, where the individual practices contract independently with the health insurance fund. Their task would be a general neurological service offered 30 hours per week, and also basic, screening neurophysiological and neurosonological examinations, with proper equipment and trained assistance. A transformation in residency training and a change in financing is needed for this plan to fulfill.]

Hungarian Immunology

JANUARY 20, 2007

[In vitro methods for measuring phagocytosis and killing of bacteria by neutrophil granulocytes]

RADA Balázs

[Accounting for about two-thirds of our white blood cells, neutrophilic granulocytes are key members of the innate immune system of the human body. They are terminally differentiated cells equipped with numerous antimicrobial weapons. Neutrophils are the first to arrive at sites of infections; their main mission is to phagocytose and destroy bacteria and funghi entering the human body. They fullfill a central role in both the inflammatory response of the body and the coordination of the innate and acquired immune systems’ function. Their deficient performance leads to impaired resistance of the host against microbes and to higher frequency of infections; their uncontrolled function, in turn, may damage our own tissues. Because of all of this, it is highly important from both basic and clinical perspective that we know as much as possible about the function of our neutrophilic granulocytes. In this paper methods available for measuring phagocytic and killing capacities of human neutrophils are reviewed. Each method has its advantages and disadvantages. The method chosen mainly depends on experimental tools available and informations needed.]