Clinical Oncology

[Mechanisms of metastasis formation as potential therapeutic targets]

TÍMÁR József1, SEBESTYÉN Anna2, KOPPER László2

NOVEMBER 30, 2021

Clinical Oncology - 2021;8(4)

[The end-stage of the tumor progression is the development of the metastatic disease. The biological basis of this progression is well known, however the exact molecular background of it is not. In this process the metastatic cancer cells develop maximal adaptation to extreme environmental clues and collaborative potential with wide array of host cells, accordingly the metastatization takes place in an organ specific manner. The metastases are different from the primary tumor but from each other as well, and this true for their genetic background as well. The ultrasensitive monitoring of this process is possible with the use of liquid biopsy and molecular tests. Till we don’t have organ metastasis specific therapeutic modalities similarly to bone metastases, the available modalities must be fine-tuned for metastatic disease and not for the primary tumor. ]

AFFILIATIONS

  1. Semmelweis Egyetem, 2. Sz. Patológiai Intézet, Budapest
  2. 1. Sz. Patológiai és Kísérletes Rákkutató Intézet, Budapest

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