Clinical Neuroscience

[The presentation of a transient hyperintense lesion with legionnaires disease in a patient, is it a coincidance or an incidental finding?]

KILIC Çoban Eda1, AKSOY Selma2, SAHIN Riza Ahmet3, UZUN Nuray3, GÖKYIGIT Münevver2

JANUARY 25, 2013

Clinical Neuroscience - 2013;66(01-02)

[Up to date the presentation of transient splenial lesions in corpus callosum were reported in diffusion weighted magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) only in epileptic patients and patients under antiepileptic therapy. A 41 year old male with no previous medical history was admitted to our clinic with symptoms of pneumonia. The neurological exam revealed stupor, but when awake his speech and orientation were normal. There were no meningeal irritation signs, cranial nerves, piramidal and cerebellar functions were normal. He had moderate respiratory distress and had bilateral rales in lower lobes while oscultating. Laboratory tests revealed high liver function levels and high acute phase reactants. Arterial blood levels showed hypoxemia. A brain MRI showed a hypointensity in the splenium of corpus callosum on T1 weighted images. There was markedly increased signal in this region on diffusion weighted imaging and hypointense on ADC. The lesion was slightly hyperintense on T2 and FLAIR weighted images. A repeat brain MRI was done 30 days after the initial study and showed a complete resolution of the splenial lesion. Transient splenial lesions can be seen due to different mechanisms in different clinical settings. It should be noted that these lesions are mostly reversible. Unnecessary therapies and procedures should be avoided in these lesions.]

AFFILIATIONS

  1. Bakirköy Mental Health Hospital, Neurology, Istanbul, Turkey
  2. Sisli Etfal Education and Research Hospital, Neurology, Istanbul, Turkey
  3. Sisli Etfal Education and Research Hospital, Infectious Disease, Istanbul, Turkey

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Clinical Neuroscience

[Sturge-Weber syndrome: clinical and radiological correlates in 86 patients]

FOGARASI András, LODDENKEMPER Tobias, MELLADO Cecilia, TUXHORN Ingrid, EVERS Georg, SARCO Dean, BURGESS C. Richard, HALÁSZ Péter, BARSI Péter, GYORSOK Zsuzsanna, GYIMESI Csilla, KÓBOR Jenõ, SIEGLER Zsuzsanna, JANSZKY József, JAKUS Rita, RÁSONYI György, EBNER Alois, WOERMANN Friedrich, SAHIN Mustafa

[Backgrounds and purpose - To correlate the extent of the leptomeningeal angiomatosis with clinical features in Sturge- Weber syndrome (SWS). Methods - The study group consisted of 86 consecutive patients aged two months to 56 (mean 7.9±10.3) years with SWS and epilepsy. Clinical and MRI data were analyzed. Results - Based on the extent of leptomeningeal angiomatosis, patients were divided into two subgroups: 43 patients had hemispheric angiomatosis and atrophy, whereas, another 43 had focal involvement. Nine of the 43 hemispherial patients (10%) showed bilateral involvement: all of these bilateral cases demonstrated dominance in a single side with hemispheric leptomeningeal angiomatosis and contralateral focal extension. Hemispheric and focal subgroups were clinically different. Patients with hemispheric SWS were younger at the age of epilepsy onset (p<0.001) and age at MRI examination (p<0.05). Neither gender, lateralization, duration of epilepsy, appearance of secondarily generalized seizures, nor seizure frequency revealed a significant difference between subgroups. Conclusion - Bilateral involvement is frequent and occurs in cases with a hemisperic involvement on one side. The age of epilepsy onset is related to the extent of leptomeningeal angiomatosis. Patients with hemispheric form of SWS presented with earlier age of seizure onset. Focal pial angiomatoses do not tend to progress (a longer duration is not associated with more frequent hemispheric involvement). Other variables including seizure frequency and secondary generalized tonic-clonic seizures are not associated with the extent of angiomatosis.]

Clinical Neuroscience

[The significance of high-resolution ultrasonography in the diagnosis of peripheral nerve disorders]

SCHEIDL Erika, JOSEF Böhm, FARBAKY Zsófia, DEBRECZENI Róbert, BERECZKI Dániel, ARÁNYI Zsuzsanna

[High resolution ultrasonography is an emerging technique for the investigation of peripheral nerves and is increasingly used worldwide in the diagnosis of peripheral nerve disorders, however, until now it is not widespread in Hungary. According to the literature this method is especially useful in entrapment neuropathies, traumatic peripheral nerve injuries, tumors of the peripheral nerves and sonographically guided interventions. Ultrasonography allows precise morphological analysis and quantitative measurements of the nerves providing useful complementary information to electrodiagnostic data. In entrapment neuropathies ultrasound shows nerve swelling mainly proximal to the sites of compression and a focal change of echotexture. On longitudinal scan, an abrupt caliber change and spindle-like swelling of the compressed nerve segment can be seen. Evaluation of the anatomical background and visualisation of the postoperative and posttraumatic changes provide useful information for planning of the therapy. Ultrasound may be of significant help in localizing the pathological nerve segment when it is at an electrophysiologically inaccessible site or when substantial secondary axonal loss precludes precise electrophysiological localization and it might even show pathological changes when nerve conduction studies are normal. Contrary to electrophysiological investigation ultrasonography might discover neurotmesis in the akute phase of traumatic nerve injuries indicating the necessity of surgical intervention. We provide a summary of the main indications and further application areas of this method.]

Clinical Neuroscience

[Mild encephalitis/encephalopathy with a reversible splenial lesion in children]

LIPTAI Zoltán, IVÁDY Balázs, BARSI Péter, VÁRALLYAY György, RUDAS Gábor, FOGARASI András

[Authors, most of them Japanese, have recently published an increasing number of articles on mild encephalitis/encephalopathy with a reversible splenial lesion. We report on two new white European patients and compare published data with our own observations. A 15- year-old girl developed headache, fever, dizziness, vomiting and nuchal rigidity over four days. CSF showed elevated protein and cell count, with the lowest serum Na being 131 mmol/L. MRI on day seven was normal, but she remained febrile, had cerebral edema and episodes of confusion. MRI on day 11 showed a small T2-hyperintense lesion with restricted diffusion in the callosal splenium. Adenoviral infection was proved, and the girl underwent a protracted course of recovery. MRI signal changes improved in six days and disappeared after four months. A 12.5-year-old girl developed headache, lethargy, drowsiness and vomiting. On day five she experienced right-sided numbness, weakness and inability to speak which lasted 12 hours. She was confused and disoriented. MRI disclosed a tiny area of increased T2- signal and restricted diffusion in the splenium. Serum Na was 133 mmol/L, CSF cell count and protein was markedly elevated, and enteroviral infection was detected. Echocardiography showed no changes predisposing to clot formation and no thrombophilia was found. Her symptoms resolved in a week and MRI was normal two months later. These two non-epileptic children increase the small number of white European patients with MERS reported so far. Both had hyponatremia and encephalitis and patient 2 had transient ischemic attack, possibly due to the cerebral edema also resulting in the splenial lesion.]

Clinical Neuroscience

[Aspirin and clopidogrel resistance: possible mechanisms and clinical relevance. Part II: Potential causes and laboratory tests]

VADÁSZ Dávid, SZTRIHA K. László, SAS Katalin, VÉCSEI László

[Recent meta-analyses have indicated that patients with vascular disease demonstrated by laboratory tests to be aspirin or clopidogrel-resistant are at an increased risk of major vascular events. The suggested mechanisms of aspirin resistance include genetic polymorphism, alternative pathways of platelet activation, aspirin-insensitive thromboxane biosynthesis, drug interactions, or a low aspirin dose. Clopidogrel resistance is likely to develop as a result of a decreased bioavailability of the active metabolite, due to genetic variation or concomitant drug treatment. Additional work is required to improve and validate laboratory tests of platelet function, so that they may become useful tools for selection of the most appropriate antiplatelet therapy for an individual patient. Improvements in antiplatelet treatment strategies in the future should lead to a reduction in premature vascular events.]

Clinical Neuroscience

[Experiences with a self developed accelerometer]

VÉR Csilla, HOFGÁRT Gergely, SZIMA Gábor, KOVÁCS GÁBOR, NYISZTOR Zoltán, KARDOS László, CSIBA László

[Objective - In neurology the objective evaluation of improvement of paresis on every-day practice. The aim of this study was to develope and test a small 3-d acceleration measuring device and validate its usefulness. Patients and methods - We collected data from 17 mild and medium severity hemiparetic, bedridden acute ischaemic and hemorrhagic stroke patients and compared with data of 22 control subjects. The devices were attached to the paretic and non-paretic extremities and any movements (m/s2) and movement-durations were registered (24h). The data of movement-monitors were compared also with the changes of National Institute of Health Stroke Scale and European Stroke Scale. The electromiograph-sensor of polysomnograph has been used for validation. Results - Mild differences could be found in the use of dominant and non-dominant upper extremities of control persons. The control persons used their upper extremities more frequently than the stroke patients. Our data showed significant correlation with National Institute of Health Stroke Scale. Higher values on the scores were accompanied with less intensive use of extremities. We found a correlation between the consiousness level of patients and their activity of upper extremities. If the patients had severe consiousness disturbances they used significantly less their upper extremities. Conclusion - Our device sensitively detected the movement-differences between paretic and non-paretic extremities and can be used for quantitative evaluation of patient's neurological and consciousness status.]

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Clinical Neuroscience

Marchiafava-Bignami disease: Report of three cases

GUNAY Gul, MESUDE Özerden, ZEYNEP Ozdemir, CAHIT Keskinkiliç, HAKAN Selçuk, BATUHAN Kara, AYSUN Soysal

Marchiafava-Bignami disease (MBD) is a rare alcohol-associated disorder characterized by demyelination and necrosis of the corpus callosum. We report three patients who had history of chronic alcoholism, different clinical presentation and MRI findings consistent with the diagnosis of Marchiafava-Bignami disease.

Clinical Neuroscience

Late simultaneous carcinomatous meningitis, temporal bone infiltrating macro-metastasis and disseminated multi-organ micro-metastases presenting with mono-symptomatic vertigo – a clinico-pathological case reporT

JARABIN András János, KLIVÉNYI Péter, TISZLAVICZ László, MOLNÁR Anna Fiona, GION Katalin, FÖLDESI Imre, KISS Geza Jozsef, ROVÓ László, BELLA Zsolt

Although vertigo is one of the most common complaints, intracranial malignant tumors rarely cause sudden asymmetry between the tone of the vestibular peripheries masquerading as a peripheral-like disorder. Here we report a case of simultaneous temporal bone infiltrating macro-metastasis and disseminated multi-organ micro-metastases presenting as acute unilateral vestibular syndrome, due to the reawakening of a primary gastric signet ring cell carcinoma. Purpose – Our objective was to identify those pathophysiological steps that may explain the complex process of tumor reawakening, dissemination. The possible causes of vestibular asymmetry were also traced. A 56-year-old male patient’s interdisciplinary medical data had been retrospectively analyzed. Original clinical and pathological results have been collected and thoroughly reevaluated, then new histological staining and immunohistochemistry methods have been added to the diagnostic pool. During the autopsy the cerebrum and cerebellum was edematous. The apex of the left petrous bone was infiltrated and destructed by a tumor mass of 2x2 cm in size. Histological reexamination of the original gastric resection specimen slides revealed focal submucosal tumorous infiltration with a vascular invasion. By immunohistochemistry mainly single infiltrating tumor cells were observed with Cytokeratin 7 and Vimentin positivity and partial loss of E-cadherin staining. The subsequent histological examination of necropsy tissue specimens confirmed the disseminated, multi-organ microscopic tumorous invasion. Discussion – It has been recently reported that the expression of Vimentin and the loss of E-cadherin is significantly associated with advanced stage, lymph node metastasis, vascular and neural invasion and undifferentiated type with p<0.05 significance. As our patient was middle aged and had no immune-deficiency, the promoting factor of the reawakening of the primary GC malignant disease after a 9-year-long period of dormancy remained undiscovered. The organ-specific tropism explained by the “seed and soil” theory was unexpected, due to rare occurrence of gastric cancer to metastasize in the meninges given that only a minority of these cells would be capable of crossing the blood brain barrier. Patients with past malignancies and new onset of neurological symptoms should alert the physician to central nervous system involvement, and the appropriate, targeted diagnostic and therapeutic work-up should be established immediately. Targeted staining with specific antibodies is recommended. Recent studies on cell lines indicate that metformin strongly inhibits epithelial-mesenchymal transition of gastric cancer cells. Therefore, further studies need to be performed on cases positive for epithelial-mesenchymal transition.

Clinical Neuroscience

[What happens to vertiginous population after emission from the Emergency Department?]

MAIHOUB Stefani, MOLNÁR András, CSIKÓS András, KANIZSAI Péter, TAMÁS László, SZIRMAI Ágnes

[Background – Dizziness is one of the most frequent complaints when a patient is searching for medical care and resolution. This can be a problematic presentation in the emergency department, both from a diagnostic and a management standpoint. Purpose – The aim of our study is to clarify what happens to patients after leaving the emergency department. Methods – 879 patients were examined at the Semmel­weis University Emergency Department with vertigo and dizziness. We sent a questionnaire to these patients and we had 308 completed papers back (110 male, 198 female patients, mean age 61.8 ± 12.31 SD), which we further analyzed. Results – Based on the emergency department diagnosis we had the following results: central vestibular lesion (n = 71), dizziness or giddiness (n = 64) and BPPV (n = 51) were among the most frequent diagnosis. Clarification of the final post-examination diagnosis took several days (28.8%), and weeks (24.2%). It was also noticed that 24.02% of this population never received a proper diagnosis. Among the population only 80 patients (25.8%) got proper diagnosis of their complaints, which was supported by qualitative statistical analysis (Cohen Kappa test) result (κ = 0.560). Discussion – The correlation between our emergency department diagnosis and final diagnosis given to patients is low, a phenomenon that is also observable in other countries. Therefore, patient follow-up is an important issue, including the importance of neurotology and possibly neurological examination. Conclusion – Emergency diagnosis of vertigo is a great challenge, but despite of difficulties the targeted and quick case history and exact examination can evaluate the central or peripheral cause of the balance disorder. Therefore, to prevent declination of the quality of life the importance of further investigation is high.]

Clinical Neuroscience

Creutzfeldt-Jakob Disease: A single center experience and systemic analysis of cases in Turkey

USLU Ilgen Ferda, ELIF Gökçal, GÜRSOY Esra Azize, KOLUKISA Mehmet, YILDIZ Babacan Gulsen

We aimed to analyze the clinical, laboratory and neuroimaging findings in patients with sporadic Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (CJD) in a single center as well as to review other published cases in Turkey. Between January 1st, 2014 and June 31st, 2017, all CJD cases were evaluated based on clinical findings, differential diagnosis, the previous misdiagnosis, electroencephalography (EEG), cerebrospinal fluid and cranial magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) findings in our center. All published cases in Turkey between 2005-2018 were also reviewed. In a total of 13 patients, progressive cognitive decline was the most common presenting symptom. Two patients had a diagnosis of Heidenhain variant, 1 patient had a diagnosis of Oppenheimer-Brownell variant. Seven patients (53.3%) had been misdiagnosed with depression, vascular dementia, normal pressure hydrocephalus or encephalitis. Eleven patients (87%) had typical MRI findings but only 5 of these were present at baseline. Asymmetrical high signal abnormalities on MRI were observed in 4 patients. Five patients (45.4%) had periodic spike wave complexes on EEG, all appeared during the follow-up. There were 74 published cases in Turkey bet­ween 2005 and 2018, with various clinical presentations. CJD has a variety of clinical features in our patient series as well as in cases reported in Turkey. Although progressive cognitive decline is the most common presenting symptom, unusual manifestations in early stages of the disease might cause misdiagnosis. Variant forms should be kept in mind in patients with isolated visual or cerebellar symptoms. MRI and EEG should be repeated during follow-up period if the clinical suspicion still exists.