Clinical Neuroscience

[Somatic defects and pain manifested at adults' drawings of a man]

GRYNAEUS Tamás1

MAY 20, 1996

Clinical Neuroscience - 1996;49(05-06)

Journal Article

[The outhor observed that “draw-a-man tests” of mentally retarded or demented adult patients may truly reflect their somatic defects or painful disorders. Drawings of mentally intact patients could also exhibit their somatic illness if it causes pain or the compensating mechanisms are insufficient. A brief discussion is given on the possible mechanisms, in connection with the body-schema.]

AFFILIATIONS

  1. Szent János Kórház, Neuropszichiátriai Osztály, Budapest

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