Clinical Neuroscience

[PROJECTIONS OF VIP/PHI NEURONS OF THE INTERSTITIAL NUCLEUS OF CAJAL IN THE RAT]

FODOR Mariann, WILLIAM Rostène, ANNE Berod, BENCZE Viktória, PALKOVITS Miklós

MARCH 20, 2007

Clinical Neuroscience - 2007;60(03-04)

[Neurons expressing VIP/PHI precursor mRNA have been localized in the interstitial nucleus of Cajal. Unilateral surgical cut through the medial forebrain bundle failed to influence VIP/PHI mRNA expression in the Cajal nucleus while brainstem hemisection or unilateral transection of the medial longitudinal fascicle reduced it markedly, ipsilateral to the knife cuts. Thus, in contrast to forebrain projecting VIP neurons in the rostral periaqueductal gray, VIP/PHI neurons in the Cajal nucleus project downwards, to the lower brainstem.]

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[In memoriam Mariann Fodor]

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[To test the effect of dehydration on brain atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP) concentrations in areas important to salt appetite, water balance and cardiovascular regulation, we subjected rats to dehydration and rehydration and measured ANP concentration in 18 brain areas, as well as all relevant peripheral parameters. Water deprivation decreased body weight, blood pressure, urine volume, and plasma ANP, while it increased urine and plasma osmolality, angiotensin II, and vasopressin. ANP greatly increased in 17 and 18 brain areas (all cut cerebral cortex) by 24 h. Rehydration for 12 h corrected all changes evoked by dehydration, including elevated ANP levels in brain. We conclude that chronic dehydration results in increased ANP in brain areas important to salt appetite and water balance. These results support a role for ANP as a neuroregulatory substance that participates in salt and water balance.]

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[SYNAPTIC CONNECTIONS OF GLUTAMATERGIC NERVE FIBRES IN THE RAT SUPRACHIASMATIC NUCLEUS]

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[Background and purpose - The hypothalamic suprachiasmatic nucleus functioning as the principal circadian pacemaker in mammals, has a rich glutamatergic innervation. Nothing is known about the terminations of the glutamatergic fibres. The aim of the present investigations was to study the relationship between glutamatergic axon terminals and vasoactive intestinal polypeptide (VIP), GABA and arginine-vasopressin (AVP) neurons in the cell group. Methods - Double label immunocytochemistry was used and the brain sections were examined under the electron microscope. Vesicular glutamate transporter type 2 was applied as marker of the glutamatergic elements. Results - Glutamatergic fibers were detected in synaptic contact with GABAergic, VIP- and AVP-positive neurons forming asymmetric type of synapses. Conclusion - The findings are the first data on the synaptic contacts of glutamatergic axon terminals with neurochemically identified neurons in the suprachiasmatic nucleus.]

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