Clinical Neuroscience

[Functional consequences of basal ganglia pathologies]

BENICZKY Sándor

MARCH 30, 2006

Clinical Neuroscience - 2006;59(03-04)

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Clinical Neuroscience

[CURRENT ISSUES IN NEUROUROLOGY]

BANYÓ Tamás

[The author gives an overview on the pathophysiology and management of neurogenic bladder dysfunction and lists the most common bladder dysfunctions observed in various diseases of the nervous system. The cited classifications, principles, and categories follow the current guidelines of WHO and the International Continence Society. The author and his co-workers have been involved in the rehabilitational treatment of patients with neurogenic bladder dysfunction for more than a decade. The review paper is supplemented with illustrations taken from the author's own cases.]

Clinical Neuroscience

[Drug problems, psychopathology in youth, sociocultural background factors]

BUDA Béla

Clinical Neuroscience

[Reply on the vascular tunnel issue by right of the last word]

CSÓKAY András

Clinical Neuroscience

[ULTRASONOGRAPHIC EXPRESSIONS OF THE FOETAL FACE MAY REFLECT FOETAL MOOD - MIMICRY IS PART OF FOETAL ETHOLOGY]

JAKOBOVITS Ákos

[The author studied foetal faces and changes in features in the coronal plane during routine prenatal ultrasound scans. Based on known behaviour of children and adults, deductions can be made about foetal mood alterations. During the four years of the study the author noted five main facial expression changes that might be reflections of foetal mood. Foetal expressions and fine lineaments may indicate adequate maturity of the central nervous system as well as satisfactory oxygen supply. Ethologically, facial mimicry is an inherited behavioural pattern.]

Clinical Neuroscience

[PLASTICITY OF NOCICEPTION: RECENT ADVANCES IN FUNCTION-ORIENTED STRUCTURAL PAIN RESEARCH]

KNYIHÁR Erzsébet, CSILLIK Bertalan

[Traditional concept holds that the pain unit consists of three neurons. The first of these, the primary nociceptive neuron, starts with the nociceptors and terminates in the dorsal spinal cord. The second one, called spinothalamic neuron, crosses over in front of the central canal and connects the dorsal horn with the thalamus. The third one, called thalamo- cortical neuron, terminates in the “pain centres” of the cerebral cortex. While this simplistic scheme is useful for didactic purposes, the actual situation is more complex. First, in the periphery it is only nociception that occurs, while pain is restricted to the levels of thalamus and the cortex. Second, pain results from interactions of excitation and inhibition, from divergence and convergence and from attention and distraction, in a diffuse and plastic system, characteristic for all levels of organization. This study describes the major cytochemical markers of primary nociceptive neurons followed by the presentation of recent data on the functional anatomy of nociception and pain, with special focus on the intrinsic antinociceptive system and the role of nitrogen oxide, opiate receptors, nociceptin and nocistatin. In addition to the classic intrinsic antinociceptive centres such as the periaqueductal gray matter and the raphe nuclei, roles of several recently discovered members of the antinociceptive system are discussed, such as the pretectal nucleus, the reticular formation, the nucleus accumbens, the nucleus tractus solitarii, the amygdala and the reticular thalamic nucleus, this latter being a coincidence detector and a centre for attention and distraction. The localisation of cortical centres involved in the generation of pain are presented based on the results of studies using imaging techniques, and the structural basis of corticospinal modulation is also outlined. Seven levels of nociception and pain are highlighted where pharmacological intervention may be successful, 1. the peripheral nociceptor, 2. the spinal ganglion, 3. the multisynaptic system of the dorsal horn, 4. the modulatory system of the brain stem, 5. the antinociceptive system, 6. the multisynaptic system of the thalamus, and 7. the cortical evaluating and localisation system that is also responsible for descending (inhibiting) control. The many levels of nociception and pain opens new ways both for pharmacological research and the general practitioner aiming to alleviate pain.]

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Clinical Neuroscience

Neuroscience highlights: Main cell types underlying memory and spatial navigation

KRABOTH Zoltán, KÁLMÁN Bernadette

Interest in the hippocampal formation and its role in navigation and memory arose in the second part of the 20th century, at least in part due to the curious case of Henry G. Molaison, who underwent brain surgery for intractable epilepsy. The temporal association observed between the removal of his entorhinal cortex along with a significant part of hippocampus and the developing severe memory deficit inspired scientists to focus on these regions. The subsequent discovery of the so-called place cells in the hippocampus launched the description of many other functional cell types and neuronal networks throughout the Papez-circuit that has a key role in memory processes and spatial information coding (speed, head direction, border, grid, object-vector etc). Each of these cell types has its own unique characteristics, and together they form the so-called “Brain GPS”. The aim of this short survey is to highlight for practicing neurologists the types of cells and neuronal networks that represent the anatomical substrates and physiological correlates of pathological entities affecting the limbic system, especially in the temporal lobe. For that purpose, we survey early discoveries along with the most relevant neuroscience observations from the recent literature. By this brief survey, we highlight main cell types in the hippocampal formation, and describe their roles in spatial navigation and memory processes. In recent decades, an array of new and functionally unique neuron types has been recognized in the hippocampal formation, but likely more remain to be discovered. For a better understanding of the heterogeneous presentations of neurological disorders affecting this anatomical region, insights into the constantly evolving neuroscience behind may be helpful. The public health consequences of diseases that affect memory and spatial navigation are high, and grow as the population ages, prompting scientist to focus on further exploring this brain region.

Clinical Neuroscience

Cyanocobalamin and cholecalciferol synergistically improve functional and histopathological nerve healing in experimental rat model

ALBAY Cem, ADANIR Oktay, AKKALP Kahraman Asli, DOGAN Burcu Vasfiye, GULAEC Akif Mehmet, BEYTEMUR Ozan

Introduction - Peripheral nerve injury (PNI) is a frequent problem among young adults. Hopefully, regeneration can occur in PNI unlike central nervous system. If nerve cut is complete, gold standard treatment is surgery, but incomplete cuts have been tried to be treated by medicines. The aim of the study was to evaluate and compare clinical and histopathological outcomes of independent treatment of each of Vitamin B12 (B12) and Vitamin D3 (D3) and their combination on sciatic nerve injury in an experimental rat model. Materials and methods - Experimental animal study was performed after the approval of BEH Ethics Committee No. 2015/10. 32 rats were grouped into four (n=8) according to treatment procedures, such as Group 1 (controls with no treatment), Group 2 (intraperitoneal 1 mg/kg/day B12), Group 3 (oral 3500 IU/kg/week D3), Group 4 (intraperitoneal 1 mg/kg/day B12+ oral 3500 IU/kg/week D3). Sciatic Functional Index (SFI) and histopathological analysis were performed. Results - SFIs of Group 2, 3, 4 were statistically significantly higher than controls. Group 2 and 3 were statistically not different, however Group 4 was statistically significantly higher than others according to SFI. Axonal degeneration (AD) in all treatment groups were statistically significantly lower than in Group 1. AD in Group 4 was significantly lower than in Group 2 and 3; there was no significant difference between Group 2 and 3. There was no significant difference between Group 1,2 and 3 in Axonolysis (A). But A of Group 4 was significantly very much lower than all others. Oedema- inflammation (OE-I) in all treatment groups were significantly lower than in Group 1; there was no significant difference between Group 2 and group 4. OE-I in Group 2 and 4 were significantly lower than in Group 3. There were no significant differences between Group 1, 2 and 3 in damage level scores; score of Group 4 was significantly lower than of Group 1. Conclusions - B12 and D3 were found effective with no statistically significant difference. But combined use of B12 and D3 improve nerve healing synergistically. We recommend combined use of B12 and D3 after PNI as soon as possible.

Clinical Neuroscience

[MR imaging of acute disseminated encephalomyelitis and multiple sclerosis in children. A review (in English language)]

PATAY Zoltán

[Inflammatory diseases of the central nervous system (CNS) are relatively rare in children, but their relevance to public health is considerable due to frequent and significant long term morbidity and even mortality. As in adults, acute disseminated encephalomyelitis (ADEM) and multiple sclerosis (MS) and their variants are the most common entities in this group of pathologies in the pediatric patient population. Recent efforts have focused on establishing standardized diagnostic criteria schemes to facilitate the diagnosis and differential diagnosis of these diseases, however especially with multiple sclerosis those have not been fully validated yet for disease occurring in children. In recent decades the role of MRI has been constantly increasing in the diagnostic work-up of suspected inflammatory diseases of the CNS as well as in the follow-up of patients with confirmed disease. Currently, MRI is the first-line diagnostic imaging modality in ADEM and MS and is fully integrated in the most widely used diagnostic criteria schemes, but it has a key role in clinical therapeutic research trials as well. This paper provides an update on the current concepts and strategies of MRI in inflammatory diseases of the CNS, as well as a review of the imaging semiology of the various disease entities and variants with emphasis on clinical and imaging particularities relevant to the pediatric patient population.]

Clinical Neuroscience

Isolated hypoglossal nerve palsy due to a jugular foramen schwannoma

ÖZTOP-CAKMAK Özgür, VANLI-YAVUZ Ebru, AYGÜN Serhat, BASTAN Birgül, EGEMEN Emrah, SOLAROGLU Ihsan, GURSOY-OZDEMIR Yesemin

Introduction – Although the involvement of the hypoglossal nerve together with other cranial nerves is common in several pathological conditions of the brain, particularly the brainstem, isolated hypoglossal nerve palsy is a rare condition and a diagnostic challenge. Case presentation – The presented patient arrived to the hospital with a history of slurred speech and an uncomfortable sensation on his tongue. Neurological examination showed left-sided hemiatrophy of the tongue with fasciculations and deviation towards the left side during protrusion. Based on the clinical and MRI findings, a diagnosis of hypoglossal nerve schwannoma was made. Discussion – Hypoglossal nerve palsy may arise from multiple causes such as trauma, infections, neoplasms, and endocrine, autoimmune and vascular pathologies. In our case, the isolated involvement of the hypoglossal nerve was at the skull base segment, where the damage to the hypoglossal nerve may occur mostly due to metastasis, nasopharyngeal carcinomas, nerve sheath tumors and glomus tumors. Conclusion – Because of the complexity of the region’s anatomy, the patient diagnosed with hypoglossal nerve schwannoma was referred for gamma knife radiosurgery.

Lege Artis Medicinae

[Avoiding unlimited energy drink consumption is a matter of our heart]

DOJCSÁKNÉ Kiss-Tóth Éva

[Energy drinks have been gaining unbroken popularity, especially among youngsters and children since they were introduced to the market. Manufacturers promise to improve performance and stamina with consuming the products, classified as non-alcoholic soft drinks. In addition to the vitamins and plant extracts, they contain a significant amount of caffeine and other stimulants (taurine, guarana). Among the active ingredients, caffeine has an outstanding effect and thereby a danger, since its overconsumption – in addition to milder he­mo­dynamic changes – can cause severe cardio­vascular consequences, cardiac arrhythmias, ion channel diseases, increased blood coagulation, myocardial infarction or reduced cerebral blood flow in susceptible consumers. Many case studies have also reported serious cardiovascular attacks among young chronic energy drink consumers. Health impairments of excessive and long-term consumption of energy drinks have been studied increasingly, however there is limited and contradictory evidence on the safety of consumption and the effectiveness of performance enhancement. ]