Clinical Neuroscience

[“From brain - through mind - to society” 13th International Semmelweis Symposium]

OCTOBER 10, 2004

Clinical Neuroscience - 2004;57(09-10)

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Clinical Neuroscience

[8th Hungarian Congress on AlzheimerAbstracts]

[Despite of the now well-recognised importance of trace elements in medical field - it is established that several diseases of the central nervous system, like Alzheimer’s disease are connected to alterations of trace elements levels - reliable data on their concentrations in normal and pathological human brain are still rare. Correlation studies are even more scarce in the literature, especially in case of Alzheimer’s disease.]

Clinical Neuroscience

[Functional imaging of cerebrospinal fluid pathology]

BORBÉLY Katalin

[The most common problem addressed by dynamic radionuclide imaging of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) abnormalities is differentiating patients with normal-pressure hydrocephalus (NPH) from those with other forms of degenerative brain disorder who would clearly not benefit from surgical treatment by ventricular shunting. Radionuclide cisternography (RC) SPECT and regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF) SPECT are critically important for the diagnosis and therapy management of patients with chronic hydrocephalus. However, radionuclide imaging is helpful not only in identifying patients with NPH showing improvement after shunting. RC reveals tracer activity outside the intracranial cavity, indeed. The importance of establishing the diagnosis arises from the fact that untreated leaks can be followed by meningitis in up to one quarter of patients. CSF collections may communicate with the subarachnoid space. RC SPECT has proved useful in assessing the communication of the arachnoid cysts (CSF collection) with the ventricular or subarachnoid compartment. Improved anatomical detail revealed by SPECT imaging is helpful in solving problems of the CSF pathology. Sensitive and accurate assessments of normal and disordered CSF dynamics can be obtained with RC SPECT.]

Clinical Neuroscience

[Traumatic prepontine tension pneumocephalus (in English language)]

KUNCZ Ádám, ROOS Arne, LUJBER László, HAAS Daniella, REFAI Al Mohamed

[Objective - A case of prepontine tension pneumocephalus after temporal bone fracture is presented. Case report - An 8-year-old girl suffered a head injury due to a fall off her bicycle. She lost her consciousness, and when she was admitted to the local hospital the Glasgow Coma Score (GCS) was 8/15 (eye opening: 2; verbal answer: 2; motor response: 4) and there was bleeding from the right ear. The patient's condition deteriorated rapidly and she needed intubation and ventilation. CT of the brain revealed large amount of air in the prepontine region, displacing the brainstem posteriorly. Patient was kept ventilated, meanwhile cerebrospinal fluid (CSF), as otorrhea appeared on the right side. CT was repeated 36 hours later, showing significantly less air in the prepontine area. The patient was weaned off the respirator, extubated and the level of consciusness improved. Later the patient developed meningitis, which was treated by systemic antibiotics with lumbar CSF drainage applied for five days. A high resolution CT scan of the petrous bone revealed a fracture crossing the middle part of the pyramid. Patient showed a full recovery except a right-sided mixed hearing loss. Conclusion - Rapid neurological deterioration following head injury can be a consequence of tension pneumocephalus. Prepontine pneumocephalus can be caused by minor fracture of petrous bone. High resolution CT is necessary to visualize minor fracture of the petrous bone. Conservative treatment may be satisfactory to treat tension hydrocephalus.]

Clinical Neuroscience

[“From brain - through mind - to society” 13th International Semmelweis Symposium Abstracts]

Clinical Neuroscience

[Dysexecutive syndromes]

SZIRMAI Imre

[Executive function is a higher order cognitive capacity that involves memory, perception and performance of complex tasks. Disorders of the executive functions are sign of lesions in the praefrontal cortex, involving the praefrontal-striatal-thalamic networks and the parietal association areas. According to signs and localization, five basic praefrontal syndromes are recognised. 1. Damage in posterior dorsolateral praefrontal cortex and subcortical nuclei causes the dorsolateral syndrome with impaired decision making, working memory and planning. 2. The ventromedial-orbitofrontal syndrome: if lesion spares the basal forebrain, memory can be preserved, but poor social decision making developes. 3. The dorsomedial syndrome consists of attention disorder, akinesia, mutism and apathy. 4. The bilateral ventrolateral praefrontal regions serve perception of self and environment. 5. The ventral lateral (verbalizer) area of the dominant hemisphere coordinates language. Executive impairments can be found in cerebrovascular, Parkinson's and other diseases of basal ganglia, and in frontotemporal lobar degeneration. The dorsolateral syndrome can be examined by the use of Wisconsin card sorting test, self ordered pointing task and the delayed response task. Praefrontal-basal function can be assessed by Gambling-, Faux Pas-, and Emotion identification tasks. Conclusions: 1. A dysexecutive syndrome does not fulfil the criteria of dementia. 2. A "frontal syndrome" is an indefinite eponym. Focal lesions in prefrontal systems lead to localization- specific symptoms, which can be defined by psychometric tests. 3. In neurological diseases associated with multifocal damage of the brain neuropsychologic tests may help to determine strategical lesions, which are responsible for the actual syndromes.]

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Fluoxetine use is associated with improved survival of patients with COVID-19 pneumonia: A retrospective case-control study

NÉMETH Klára Zsófia, SZÛCS Anna , VITRAI József , JUHÁSZ Dóra , NÉMETH Pál János , HOLLÓ András

We aimed to investigate the association between fluoxetine use and the survival of hospitalised coronavirus disease (COVID-19) pneumonia patients. This retrospective case-control study used data extracted from the medical records of adult patients hospitalised with moderate or severe COVID-19 pneumonia at the Uzsoki Teaching Hospital of the Semmelweis University in Budapest, Hungary between 17 March and 22 April 2021. As a part of standard medical treatment, patients received anti-COVID-19 therapies as favipiravir, remdesivir, baricitinib or a combination of these drugs; and 110 of them received 20 mg fluoxetine capsules once daily as an adjuvant medication. Multivariable logistic regression was used to evaluate the association between fluoxetine use and mortality. For excluding a fluoxetine-selection bias potentially influencing our results, we compared baseline prognostic markers in the two groups treated versus not treated with fluoxetine. Out of the 269 participants, 205 (76.2%) survived and 64 (23.8%) died between days 2 and 28 after hospitalisation. Greater age (OR [95% CI] 1.08 [1.05–1.11], p<0.001), radiographic severity based on chest X-ray (OR [95% CI] 2.03 [1.27–3.25], p=0.003) and higher score of shortened National Early Warning Score (sNEWS) (OR [95% CI] 1.20 [1.01-1.43], p=0.04) were associated with higher mortality. Fluoxetine use was associated with an important (70%) decrease of mortality (OR [95% CI] 0.33 [0.16–0.68], p=0.002) compared to the non-fluoxetine group. Age, gender, LDH, CRP, and D-dimer levels, sNEWS, Chest X-ray score did not show statistical difference between the fluoxetine and non-fluoxetine groups supporting the reliability of our finding. Provisional to confirmation in randomised controlled studies, fluoxetine may be a potent treatment increasing the survival for COVID-19 pneumonia.

Clinical Neuroscience

Late simultaneous carcinomatous meningitis, temporal bone infiltrating macro-metastasis and disseminated multi-organ micro-metastases presenting with mono-symptomatic vertigo – a clinico-pathological case reporT

JARABIN András János, KLIVÉNYI Péter, TISZLAVICZ László, MOLNÁR Anna Fiona, GION Katalin, FÖLDESI Imre, KISS Geza Jozsef, ROVÓ László, BELLA Zsolt

Although vertigo is one of the most common complaints, intracranial malignant tumors rarely cause sudden asymmetry between the tone of the vestibular peripheries masquerading as a peripheral-like disorder. Here we report a case of simultaneous temporal bone infiltrating macro-metastasis and disseminated multi-organ micro-metastases presenting as acute unilateral vestibular syndrome, due to the reawakening of a primary gastric signet ring cell carcinoma. Purpose – Our objective was to identify those pathophysiological steps that may explain the complex process of tumor reawakening, dissemination. The possible causes of vestibular asymmetry were also traced. A 56-year-old male patient’s interdisciplinary medical data had been retrospectively analyzed. Original clinical and pathological results have been collected and thoroughly reevaluated, then new histological staining and immunohistochemistry methods have been added to the diagnostic pool. During the autopsy the cerebrum and cerebellum was edematous. The apex of the left petrous bone was infiltrated and destructed by a tumor mass of 2x2 cm in size. Histological reexamination of the original gastric resection specimen slides revealed focal submucosal tumorous infiltration with a vascular invasion. By immunohistochemistry mainly single infiltrating tumor cells were observed with Cytokeratin 7 and Vimentin positivity and partial loss of E-cadherin staining. The subsequent histological examination of necropsy tissue specimens confirmed the disseminated, multi-organ microscopic tumorous invasion. Discussion – It has been recently reported that the expression of Vimentin and the loss of E-cadherin is significantly associated with advanced stage, lymph node metastasis, vascular and neural invasion and undifferentiated type with p<0.05 significance. As our patient was middle aged and had no immune-deficiency, the promoting factor of the reawakening of the primary GC malignant disease after a 9-year-long period of dormancy remained undiscovered. The organ-specific tropism explained by the “seed and soil” theory was unexpected, due to rare occurrence of gastric cancer to metastasize in the meninges given that only a minority of these cells would be capable of crossing the blood brain barrier. Patients with past malignancies and new onset of neurological symptoms should alert the physician to central nervous system involvement, and the appropriate, targeted diagnostic and therapeutic work-up should be established immediately. Targeted staining with specific antibodies is recommended. Recent studies on cell lines indicate that metformin strongly inhibits epithelial-mesenchymal transition of gastric cancer cells. Therefore, further studies need to be performed on cases positive for epithelial-mesenchymal transition.

Lege Artis Medicinae

[History of vaccine production in Hungary ]

ÓCSAI Lajos

[This study presents the complete history of the Hungarian vaccine production, partly in association with the process of fighting vaccine-preventable infectious diseases, and underlines the fact that every government actively contributed to the age-adjusted mandatory vaccination schedule of the past 140 years. It demonstrates the various achievements from the smallpox lymph production through the launch of diphtheria serum production at Phylaxia and the establishment of the National Public Health Institute (OKI) with its vaccine production and the later institutional transformation of OKI into Humán as economic corporation to its closure. Among all OKI’s vaccine production activities, this study focuses on the production of influenza vaccines, due to its international importance in the 1960s and 1970s. The vaccine production against diphtheria tetanus and pertussis stands out from Humán’s activities, and the tetanus component of this vaccine is still used in the products of a multinational vaccine manufacturer. ]

Lege Artis Medicinae

[Focus on Lege Artis Medicinae (LAM)]

VASAS Lívia, GEGES József

[Three decades ago, LAM was launched with the goal of providing scientific information about medicine and its frontiers. From the very beginning, LAM has also concerned a special subject area while connecting medicine with the world of art. In the palette of medical articles, it remained a special feature to this day. The analysis of the history of LAM to date was performed using internationally accepted publication guidelines and scientific databases as a pledge of objectivity. We examined the practice of LAM if it meets the main criteria, the professional expectations of our days, when publishing contents of the traditional printed edition and its electronic version. We explored the visibility of articles in the largest bibliographic and scientific metric databases, and reviewed the LAM's place among the Hun­ga­rian professional journals. Our results show that in recent years LAM has gained international reputation des­pite publishing in Hungarian spoken by a few people. This is due to articles with foreign co-authors as well as references to LAM in articles written exclusively by foreign researchers. The journal is of course full readable in the Hungarian bibliographic databases, and its popularity is among the leading ones. The great virtue of the journal is the wide spectrum of the authors' affiliation, with which they cover almost completely the Hungarian health care institutional sys­tem. The special feature of its columns is enhanced by the publication of writings on art, which may increase Hungarian and foreign interest like that of medical articles.]

Clinical Neuroscience

Cholinesterase inhibitors and memantine for the treatment of Alzheimer and non-Alzheimer dementias

BALÁZS Nóra , BERECZKI Dániel, KOVÁCS Tibor

In aging societies, the morbidity and mortality of dementia is increasing at a significant rate, thereby imposing burden on healthcare, economy and the society as well. Patients’ and caregivers’ quality of life and life expectancy are greatly determined by the early diagnosis and the initiation of available symptomatic treatments. Cholinesterase inhibitors and memantine have been the cornerstones of Alzheimer’s therapy for approximately two decades and over the years, more and more experience has been gained on their use in non-Alzheimer’s dementias too. The aim of our work was to provide a comprehensive summary about the use of cholinesterase inhibitors and memantine for the treatment of Alzheimer’s and non-Alzheimers’s dementias.