Clinical Neuroscience

[Current issues of neuroimaging diagnostics of multiple sclerosis]

BAJZIK Gábor

MARCH 25, 2009

Clinical Neuroscience - 2009;62(03-04)

[Magnetic resonance imaging techniques have been routinely used in diagnostics and follow-up of multiple sclerosis and magnetic resonance imaging findings are incorporated into the current diagnostic criteria of the disease. International guidelines were created aiming to define the indication, timing, minimum requirements and interpretation of magnetic resonance examination in multiple sclerosis. In Hungary, there is a lack of widely-accepted standardized protocol, therefore presenting the magnetic resonance diagnostic criteria and the international guidelines may prove useful. It may also point towards consideration of a national guideline.]

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