Clinical Neuroscience

[Actigraphy: A valuable diagnostic tool or a luxury investigation? (Neuropsychiatric aspects)]

RAJNA Péter, SZOMSZÉD Anita

OCTOBER 20, 2009

Clinical Neuroscience - 2009;62(09-10)

[Aim - Despite of the continuing interest in actigraphy it has a relatively low impact on the everyday medical routine. Accordingly, we set out to review the current state and to recommend relevant further indications for its application, especially in neuropsychiatry. Method - We surveyed the areas of its use and then reviewed the literature, with special regard to its advantages and methodological limitations. Adding to the results we enlarged the results with our own personal experience. Results - The limitations of the method may be decreased by methodological manipulations (a simple rational data reduction is recommended). Actigraphy appears to be a useful tool in the diagnosis of illnesses, syndromes or disorders influencing the vigilance level, the motor performance or the energetic balance of the organism. We constructed a list of the most relevant fields of indication of actigraphy in diagnostics, illustrated by anecdotal actigraphic case records. Conclusion - Further methodological considerations are needed for the successful evaluation of accelerometry. Targeted basic epidemiological studies in the healthy population and in patient groups should solve various open questions in order to make full use of the advantages of actigraphy in the everyday clinical routine.]

COMMENTS

0 comments

Further articles in this publication

Clinical Neuroscience

[Pompe’s disease - Part II - Treatment strategies and enzyme replacement]

ILLÉS Zsolt, VÁRADI VISY Katalin

[Pompe’s disease is an ultra-orphan disease caused by the deficiency of lysosomal alpha-glucosidase. At present, it is the only inherited muscle disorder, which can be treated by replacement of the enzyme. Three international randomized trials examined the clinical efficacy of enzyme replacement therapy (ERT) in infantile and late-onset diseases. ERT reduced the risk of death, respiratory support, invasive ventilation and improved cardiomyopathy. Respiration, muscle function and quality of life were improved in both infantile and late-onset diseases. These randomized and pilot trials also proved the safety of the treatment. At present it is not clear if antibodies induced by ERT result in decreased efficacy. In this review, we also discuss our experiences obtained by the treatment of three patients, and review the spectrum of supportive and experimental treatment strategies.]

Clinical Neuroscience

[Interhemispheric propagation of seizures in mesial temporal lobe epilepsy]

ERÕSS Loránd, ENTZ László, FABÓ Dániel, JAKUS Rita, SZŰCS Anna, RÁSONYI György, KELEMEN Anna, BARCS Gábor, JUHOS Vera, BALOGH Attila, BARSI Péter, CLEMENS Zsófia, HALÁSZ Péter

[Objectives - To investigate interhemispheric propagation of mesial temporal lobe epilepsy seizures in patients undergoing long-term video-EEG monitoring with combined scalp and foramen ovale electrodes. Aim of the study - To reveal possible interhemispheric propagation patterns in mesial temporal lobe epilepsy, to improve presurgical evaluation of temporal epileptic patients. Methods - Sixty-five seizures from 20 patients were analyzed. We defined two contralateral seizure propagation patterns: Type I for those seizures that spread to the contralateral foramen ovale electrodes earlier than to the contralateral scalp electrodes, and type II for the opposite. Participants - Twenty drug resistant epileptic patients were investigated in frame of their presurgical evaluation. Results - The majority of seizures (80%) were classified as type I. Inter-foramen ovale electrode propagation time was significantly shorter for type I compared to type II seizures. Ninety percent of patients had either type I or type II seizures only. Patients with type I seizures significantly more often had mesiotemporal structural alterations evident on magnetic resonance imaging scans, and became more often seizure-free after surgery compared to patients with type II seizures whose surgical outcome was less favorable or surgery could not be indicated because of independent bilateral ictal seizure-onset. Conclusions - The two types of contralateral propagation patterns we are describing seem to represent two subtypes of mesial temporal lobe epilepsy with different morphological and prognostic features. The predominance of type I over type II seizures together with shorter propagation times for type I seizures indicate a role of a more direct and dominant interhemispheric pathway in mesial temporal lobe epilepsy.]

Clinical Neuroscience

[The transcription of the amyloid precursor protein and tryptophan 2,3-dioxygenase genes are increased by aging in the rat brain]

KÁLMÁN Sára, PÁKÁSKI Magdolna, SZŰCS Szabina, GARAB Dénes, DOMOKOS Ágnes, ZVARA Ágnes, PUSKÁS László, BAGDY György, ZELENA Dóra, KÁLMÁN János

[Aging itself is considered as a major risk factor of dementia. The prevalence of the Alzheimer’s disease (AD) is increasing exponentially after the age of 65 and doubles every 5 years. The major aim of our present research was to examine the effect of aging on the transcription of certain genes associated with neurodegenerative disorders in the rat brain. The influence of the vasopressin (VP) hormone was also examined in the same experimental paradigm. Age dependent transcriptional changes of the following four genes were examined in the cerebral cortex: the first was the gene of the amyloid precursor protein (APP) which is abnormally cleaved to toxic beta-amyloid fragments. These aggregated peptides are the major components of the senile plaques in the AD brain. The second one was the mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK1) gene. The MAPK is involved in the abnormal hyperphosphorylation of the tau-protein which results in aggregated neurofibrillary tangles. The beta-actin gene was the third one. The protein product of this gene is considered to be involved in synaptogenesis, neuronal plasticity and clinical conditions like depression and AD. The last one was the gene of the tryptophan 2,3-dioxygenase (TDO2) enzyme. The activity of this enzyme is considered as a rate limiting factor in the metabolism of the neuro-immune modulator quinolinic acid (QUIN). The transciptional activity of young (2.5 months) and aged (13 months) Brattleboro rats with or without VP expression were compared by means of real time PCR technique. The cortical transciptional activity of the APP and TDO2 genes were increased in the aged animals as compared with the activity of the young ones, and this effect was independent on the presence of the VP. Our results indicate the importance of certain age dependent transcriptional changes might influence the mechanism of AD and other neurodegenerative disorders.]

Clinical Neuroscience

[Account on the scientific meeting of the Környey Society in 2009]

Clinical Neuroscience

[The effect of autogenic training combined with organ formula and motion therapy on spontaneus and provoked headaches]

ZSOMBÓK Terézia

All articles in the issue

Related contents

Clinical Neuroscience

[PRAMIPEXOLE THERAPY OF RESTLESS LEGS SYNDROME]

VIDA Zsuzsanna, SZAKÁCS ZOLTÁN

[The restless legs syndrome is a disorder belonging to the family of movement disorders during sleep, often remains unrecognized, although it is the second most common cause of chronic sleep deficiency and daytime sleepiness. In accordance with international guidelines, pharmacotherapy of this disorder should begin with a dopamine agonist. Owing to their efficacy and favorable safety profile, newly introduced, selective dopamine agonists have become extensively used for this purpose. This study evaluated the efficacy of one of the products in this group, pramipexole. Fifty-one patients suffering from idiopathic restless legs syndrome underwent monotherapy with pramipexole in daily doses of 0.25 to 1.0 mg. Therapeutic efficacy was evaluated using three tools, i.e. follow-up questionnaires, actigraphy, and Forced Immobilisation Test. An excellent therapeutic effect was seen in more than 80 per cent of the study population. As shown by findings of the follow-up questionnaires, pramipexole resulted in substantial improvements of both daytime and nighttime symptoms of RLS. Actigraphy monitoring demonstrated a statistically significant increase in the ratio of time spent without limb movement to the time spent in bed; furthermore, the result of the Forced Immobilisation Test also improved. It seems fair to conclude from the findings of this study that pramipexole monotherapy is an effective treatment in restless legs syndrome.]

Clinical Neuroscience

[THE ROLE OF TREMOROMETRY IN PREDICTING THE OUTCOME OF ABLATIVE SURGERIES]

KOVÁCS Norbert, BALÁS István, ILLÉS Zsolt, KELLÉNYI Lóránt, NAGY Ferenc

[Ablative neurosurgical interventions are widely used for the treatment of advanced Parkinson's disease. However, in some cases, the achieved result is temporary and repeat operation is necessary to obtain a permanent effect. By analyzing 30 ablative surgeries using comparative accelerometry, we looked for a biological marker predicting the efficiency. In 27 cases where clinical symptoms were permanently improved, a significant increase in rest tremor frequency was observed in addition to reduction in tremor intensity. In contrast, in those three cases where the clinical effect of the surgery was only temporary, the frequency of tremor remained unchanged despite of the transitory decrease in intensity. We thus hypothesize that postoperative change in frequency of tremor but not the intensity may predict the outcome of ablative treatments.]

Clinical Neuroscience

[10 years, 600 monitoring sessions - our experience with the video EEG monitoring of children]

SIEGLER Zsuzsa, HEGYI Márta, JAKUS Rita, NEUWIRTH Magda, PARAICZ Éva, SZABÓ Léna, FOGARASI András

[Introduction- The only Hungarian video EEG laboratorywhere children of ages 0-18 can be continuously monitoredfor several days was opened 1 June 2001 at Department ofNeurology of Bethesda Children’s Hospital.Objectives- Summarizing our 10 years of experience withthe video EEG monitoring (VEM) of children and defining theplace of VEM in the treatment of childhood epilepsy inHungary.Patients and methods- We have processed data from 597monitoring sessions on 541 patients between June 1, 2001and 31 May, 2011 based on our database and the detailedsummaries of the procedures. Results- 509 patients were under the age of 18. The average length of the sessions was 3.1 days. We haveobserved habitual episodes or episodes in question in 477(80%) sessions. 241 (40%) sessions were requested with anepilepsy surgery indication, and 74 patients had 84 opera-tions. 356 (60%) were requested with a differential diagnosisindication, and 191 (53%) cases of epilepsy werediagnosed. We most commonly diagnosed symptomaticgeneralized epilepsy (57 cases). In 165 sessions the episodein question was not diagnosed as epilepsy. Among theparoxysmal episodes we have identified events ofpsychogenic origin, movement disorders, sleep disordersand behavioral disorders. Only 3% of the differential diag-nosis procedures brought no additional clinical information.Discussion- The diagnostic efficiency in our VEM laborato-ry is in accordance with the data found in the literature.Besides epilepsy surgery VEM is recommended if suspectedepileptic episodes occur and interictal epileptiform signs arenot present or are not in accordance with the symptoms, ifthere is no explanation for therapy resistance and if paroxys-mal episodes of non-epileptic origin are suspected but theycannot be identified based on the anamnesis. VEM is also helpful in diagnosing subtle seizures. The procedure hasnumerous additional benefits in patient care and in trainingthe parents and hospital staff. ]

Clinical Neuroscience

Effect of maternal migraine on children’s quality of sleep

GÜNGEN Dogan Belma, YILDIRIM Ahmet, ARAS Guzey Yesim, ARAS Atılgan Bilgehan, TEKESIN Aysel, AYAZ Burcu Ayse

Backround and aim - Sleep disorders are common problems associated with migraine. These sleep disorders are known to have a debilitating impact on daily lives of migraine patients. The purpose of this study is to assess the effects of sleep disorders experienced by individuals suffering from migraine on their children as well as the presence of sleep disorders in their children. Materials and methods - This study included 96 mothers diagnosed with migraine and their 96 healthy children, and a control group formed of 74 healthy mothers and their children. Exclusion criteria were chronic systemic disease or central nervous system disease or a history of smoking/alcohol use for mothers, and chronic disease or regularly occurring headaches or recurrent abdominal pain for children. For maternal evaluation, the Visual Analogue Scale (VAS), Migraine Disability Assessment Scale (MIDAS), Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index (PSQI), Beck Depression Index (BDI) and Beck Anxiety Index (BAI) were used and for the assessment of the children’s quality of sleep, the Children’s Sleep Habits Questionnaire (CSHQ) was used. The SPSS 21.0 program was employed for statistical analysis, with statistical significance set at p<0.05. Findings - The mean age of the group with migraine was 36.6±7.1 years, while that of the control group was 38.01±4.7. Mood and sleep disorders were more frequently observed in the participants with migraine (p<0.05). Sleep disorders were significantly low in children with migraineur mothers (p=0.02); and child sleep anxiety is significantly high in control group (p=0.048). Maternal BAI scores had a significant influence on their children’s quality of sleep. Discussion and conclusion - In our study, the presence of migraine-type headache in mothers was observed to have a positive effect on reducing sleep disorders in the children. Recurrent headaches of the migraineur mothers with or without sleep disorders and psychiatric comorbidities did not influence the quality of sleep in their children directly, but the sleep anxiety of the children may have had an impact on it.

Lege Artis Medicinae

[Occurrence of cardiometabolic risk factors among shift workers]

JERMENDY György, NÁDASI Judit, HEGYI Ilona, VASAS István, HIDVÉGI Tibor

[INTRODUCTION - Shift workers have an impaired circadian rhythm, which might have an adverse effect on their health. In order to assess cardiometabolic risk in shift workers, a cross-sectional study was performed among active workers (aged 25-66 years, with a minimal shift working experience of 5 years). METHODS - In total 481 workers (121 men, 360 women) registered by the occupational health service were enrolled in our study. Most participants worked in the light industry (58.2%) or in public service (23.9%). Following questionnaire-based data recording, anthropometric measurements and physical examination were performed and fasting venous blood sample was taken for measuring laboratory parameters. Data from shift workers (n=234, 54 men and 180 women, age: 43.9±8.1 years) were compared with those of day workers (n=247, 67 men and 180 women, age: 42.8±8.5 years). RESULTS - Compared with day workers, shift workers had bigger weight (76.6±16.1 vs 73.9±17.6 kg; p<0.05), higher BMI index (27.5±5.3 vs 26.0±4.9 kg/m2; p<0.01) and systolic blood pressure (123±19 vs 119±16 mmHg, p<0.01), and higher prevalence rate of diabetes (4.3 vs 1.2 %; p<0.05) and cardiovascular diseases (3.8 vs 0.8 %; p<0.05). In addition, the proportion of participants who performed regular physical activity was lower (20.6 vs 38.7 %; p<0.001) and that of current smokers were higher (35.0 % vs 19.5 %; p<0.001) in shift workers than in day workers. In laboratory findings, only one difference has been found: HDL-cholesterol level was lower among women (shift workers versus workers: 1.56±0.32 vs 1.68±0.36 mmol/l; p<0.01). CONCLUSION - Long-term shift work (day-night) results in a less healthy lifestyle and worse cardiometabolic risk factors compared with day work. Thus, our study highlights the importance of measures for preventing cardiovascular diseases in shift workers.]