Lege Artis Medicinae

[The Lolita Effect, or the Rejuvenation of “the Homer of Painting” ]

GEREVICH József

JUNE 20, 2016

Lege Artis Medicinae - 2016;26(05-06)

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Lege Artis Medicinae

[Neurological symptoms in a patient with treated multiple myeloma]

ZOMBORI Tamás, PIUKOVICS Klára

[INTRODUCTION - Meningeal infiltration by multiple myeloma is rare. Its incidence among cases of multiple myeloma is 1%. CASE REPORT - Multiple myeloma was diagnosed in a 53-year-old woman in December 2014. After chemotherapy, the disease was treated with autologous bone marrow transplantation in June 2015. Remission was observed through two months, but in August the patient was hospitalized due to severe headache with neck stiffness. Meningitis or viral encephalitis were suspected following her investigation. She was taken to the Intensive Care Unit because of a progression to status epilepticus. The EEG-examination revealed generalized slow wave activity and a right temporal epileptiform focus manifesting rarely. Clinical brain death developed on the 17th day in hospital. DISCUSSION - Although meningeal infiltration is infrequent in multiple myeloma, the present case report draws attention to this possibility. ]

Lege Artis Medicinae

[Poet and Physician on the Border Between Existence and Non-Existence ]

CZIGLÉNYI Boglárka

Lege Artis Medicinae

[Music therapy in hospice care]

KOLLÁR János

[The study gives a short review of some music therapy methods can be applied on the field of hospice care. Its aim is drawing the attention to the topic and enhancement of the method in the hospice movement in Hungary. The results of research works support the idea of applying both active and receptive music therapy for ensuring advantageous results in high quality care provided for dying patients. Properly chosen musical interventions applied by qualified music therapists within a therapeutic relationship are able to improve amongst others the quality of life of dying people by ensuring their inner peace, reducing the feeling of pain and anxiety and supporting their psychical-spiritual development. Besides the dying patients, hospice workers and the relatives of the patients can also experience the benefits of music therapy. ]

Lege Artis Medicinae

[Miles and the Dust ]

LENGYEL Dávid

Lege Artis Medicinae

[The role and scope of screening and diagnosing obstructive sleep apnea syndrome by the family physician]

ANNUS János Kristóf, ÁDÁM Ágnes, BECZE Ádám, CSATLÓS Dalma, LÁSZLÓ Andrea, KALABAY László, SZAKÁCS ZOLTÁN

[Diagnosis and treatment of sleep disorders play an increasingly important role in everyday clinical practice of family physicians. Obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSAS) is a significant disorder of this disease group due to its relatively high incidence rate and increasing risk of adverse medical outcomes in the course of time. The prevalence of OSAS is 2-4% in the general population. It is characterized by obstructive apneas and hypopneas mostly with desaturations and/or arousals caused by the repetitive collapse of the upper airway during sleep. Besides impairing sleep efficacy and daytime neurocognitive functions, OSAS increases cardiovascular risk as well. The typical clinical presentation is an excessive daytime sleepiness and loud snoring interrupted by brief pauses of breathing. It can be a risk factor for treatment-resistant and/or non-dipper hypertension, nocturnal cardiac arrhythmias, stroke, cognitive decline and depression. The importance of OSAS is presented by the fact that - according to the latest related Hungarian law reforms - risk evaluation of the disorder is part of the medical assessment of suitability for a driving license. The family physician’s tasks are to recognize the clinical symptoms, identify high-risk patients with potential complications who need adequate treatment and eventually guide them to sleep-diagnostic centers. ]

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[The role of sleep in the relational memory processes ]

CSÁBI Eszter, ZÁMBÓ Ágnes, PROKECZ Lídia

[A growing body of evidence suggests that sleep plays an essential role in the consolidation of different memory systems, but less is known about the beneficial effect of sleep on relational memory processes and the recognition of emotional facial expressions, however, it is a fundamental cognitive skill in human everyday life. Thus, the study aims to investigate the effect of timing of learning and the role of sleep in relational memory processes. 84 young adults (average age: 22.36 (SD: 3.22), 21 male/63 female) participated in our study, divided into two groups: evening group and morning group indicating the time of learning. We used the face-name task to measure relational memory and facial expression recognition. There were two sessions for both groups: the immediate testing phase and the delayed retesting phase, separated by 24 hours. 84 young adults (average age: 22.36 (SD: 3.22), 21 male/63 female) participated in our study, divided into two groups: evening group and morning group indicating the time of learning. We used the face-name task to measure relational memory and facial expression recognition. There were two sessions for both groups: the immediate testing phase and the delayed retesting phase, separated by 24 hours. Our results suggest that the timing of learning and sleep plays an important role in the stabilizing process of memory representation to resist against forgetting.]

Clinical Neuroscience

The etiology and age-related properties of patients with delirium in coronary intensive care unit and its effects on inhospital and follow up prognosis

ALTAY Servet, GÜRDOGAN Muhammet, KAYA Caglar, KARDAS Fatih, ZEYBEY Utku, CAKIR Burcu, EBIK Mustafa, DEMIR Melik

Delirium is a syndrome frequently encountered in intensive care and associated with a poor prognosis. Intensive care delirium is mostly based on general and palliative intensive care data in the literature. In this study, we aimed to investigate the incidence of delirium in coronary intensive care unit (CICU), related factors, its relationship with inhospital and follow up prognosis, incidence of age-related delirium and its effect on outcomes. This study was conducted with patients hospitalized in CICU of a tertiary university hospital between 01 August 2017 and 01 August 2018. Files of all patients were examined in details, and demographic, clinic and laboratory parameters were recorded. Patients confirmed with psychiatry consultation were included in the groups of patients who developed delirium. Patients were divided into groups with and without delirium developed, and baseline features, inhospital and follow up prognoses were investigated. In addition, patients were divided into four groups as <65 years old, 65-75 yo, 75-84 yo and> 85 yo, and the incidence of delirium, related factors and prognoses were compared among these groups. A total of 1108 patients (mean age: 64.4 ± 13.9 years; 66% men) who were followed in the intensive care unit with variable indications were included in the study. Of all patients 11.1% developed delirium in the CICU. Patients who developed delirium were older, comorbidities were more frequent, and these patients showed increased inflammation findings, and significant increase in inhospital mortality compared to those who did not develop delirium (p<0.05). At median 9-month follow up period, rehospitalization, reinfarction, cognitive dysfunction, initiation of psychiatric therapy and mortality were significantly higher in the delirium group (p<0.05). When patients who developed delirium were divided into four groups by age and analyzed, incidence of delirium and mortality rate in delirium group were significantly increased by age (p<0.05). Development of delirium in coronary intensive care unit is associated with increased inhospital and follow up morbidity and mortality. Delirium is more commonly seen in geriatric patients and those with comorbidity, and is associated with a poorer prognosis. High-risk patients should be more carefully monitored for the risk of delirium.

Clinical Neuroscience

Delirium due to the use of topical cyclopentolate hydrochloride

MAHMUT Atum, ERKAN Çelik, GÜRSOY Alagöz

Introduction - Our aim is to present a rare case where a child had delirium manifestation after instillation of cyclopentolate. Case presentation - A 7-year old patient was seen in our outpatient clinic, and cyclopentolate was dropped three times at 10 minutes intervals in both eyes. The patient suddenly developed behavioral disorders along with gait disturbance, and complained of visual hallucinations 20-25 minutes after the last drop. The patient was transferred to intensive care unit and 0.02 mg/kg IV. physostigmine was administered. The patient improved after minutes of onset of physostigmine, and was discharged with total recovery after 30 minutes. Conclusion - Delirium is a rare systemic side effect of cyclopentolate. The specific antidote is physostigmine, which can be used in severely agitated patients who are not responding to other therapies.

Clinical Neuroscience

Acute effect of sphenopalatine ganglion block with lidocaine in a patient with SUNCT

KOCATÜRK Mehtap, KOCATÜRK Özcan

Short-lasting unilateral neuralgiform headache with conjunctival injection and tearing/short-lasting unilateral neuralgiform headache with cranial autonomic features (SUNCT/SUNA) is a rare severe headache. At the time of an attack, it can hinder a patient from eating and requires acute intervention. The sphenopalatine ganglion is an extracranial parasympathetic ganglion with both sensory and autonomic fibers. Sphenopalatine ganglion block has long been used in the treatment of headache, particularly when conventional methods have failed. Here, we present a patient who was resistant to intravenous lidocaine, but responded rapidly to sphenopalatine ganglion block during an acute episode of SUNCT/SUNA.

Clinical Neuroscience

[Zonisamide: one of the first-line antiepileptic drugs in focal epilepsy ]

JANSZKY József, HORVÁTH Réka, KOMOLY Sámuel

[Chronic administration of antiepileptic drugs without history of unprovoked epileptic seizures are not recommended for epilepsy prophylaxis. Conversely, if the patient suffered the first unprovoked seizure, then the presence of epileptiform discharges on the EEG, focal neurological signs, and the presence of epileptogenic lesion on the MRI are risk factors for a second seizure (such as for the development of epilepsy). Without these risk factors, the chance of a second seizure is about 25-30%, while the presence of these risk factors (for example signs of previous stroke, neurotrauma, or encephalitis on the MRI) can predict >70% seizure recurrence. Thus the International League Against Epilepsy (ILAE) re-defined the term ’epilepsy’ which can be diagnosed even after the first seizure, if the risk of seizure recurrence is high. According to this definition, we can start antiepileptic drug therapy after a single unprovoked seizure. There are four antiepileptic drugs which has the highest evidence (level „A”) as first-line initial monotherapy for treating newly diagnosed epilepsy. These are: carbamazepine, phenytoin, levetiracetam, and zonisamide (ZNS). The present review focuses on the ZNS. Beacuse ZNS can be administrated once a day, it is an optimal drug for maintaining patient’s compliance and for those patients who have a high risk for developing a non-compliance (for example teenagers and young adults). Due to the low interaction potential, ZNS treatment is safe and effective in treating epilepsy of elderly people. ZNS is an ideal drug in epilepsy accompanied by obesity, because ZNS has a weight loss effect, especially in obese patients.]