Lege Artis Medicinae

[LIFE-diabetes]

MATOS Lajos

APRIL 21, 2004

Lege Artis Medicinae - 2004;14(04)

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Lege Artis Medicinae

[THE PROSPECTS OF SURGICAL TREATMENT OF END-STAGE EMPHYSEMA (COPD): THE LUNG VOLUME REDUCTION SURGERY]

KECSKÉS László

[On the basis of relevant international literature the author presents the indications, contraindications, risks and results of the lung volume reduction surgery applicable in cases of therapyresistant end-stage COPD. These interventions, which require strong interdisciplinary cooperation of a pneumonologist, a thoracic surgeon, an anaesthesiologist and a physiotherapeutist were introduced in 1995 as a result of Cooper's study. A multicentric prospective study analysed the efficiency of this new surgical procedure. The results were evaluated in 2003 and it is important to be emphasised that in short term (3-6 months) and medium term (2-4 years) an improvement of lung function and of the quality of life can be observed in those patients who have heterogeneous emphysema, mainly in the upper lobe. Also, in case of homogenous emphysema this surgical procedure can be effective but perioperative mortality is higher and a deterioration in the health-state can occur as soon as six month after the intervention. The follow-up analyses of COPD patients with alpha- 1 antitrypsin deficiency show similarly moderate results. In Szombathely, Hungary 67 such interventions were carried out on 55 patients between 1997 and 2002, with a 4.4 % mortality rate which corresponds the international standard. Our own experience also supports the fact that in short and medium term the FEV1, RV, paO2, paCO2 and the quality of life take a positive change, the continuous O2-demand of patients will cease to exist and they regain parts of the former activity. The LVRS bears remarkable cost due to the use of staplers and surgical materials as well as longer hospital stay with the need of intensive care unit. Today in Hungary the LVRS is a realistic alternative in case of severe COPD to lung transplantation. The cost of an LVRS is maximum 10% of a lung transplantation. Patients having undergone an LVRS as well as patients unacceptable for LVRS may be suitable for lung transplantation.]

Lege Artis Medicinae

[HUMAN DENDRITIC CELLS AND INFECTIVE AGENTS]

KIS Zoltán

[Dendritic cells represent important components of the innate and adaptive immune responses. Human dendritic cells can be divided into two major subsets: myeloid and plasmacytoid (lymphoid) dendritic cells. The unique function of the dendritic cells is to capture antigens, present and to activate the antigenic peptides to the T lymphocytes. Dendritic cells go through a maturation process both in vitro and in vivo. By the use of pathogenrecognition- receptors the immature dendritic cells sense diverse pathogens or their various components, or cellular factors produced by the infected neighboring non-dendritic cells, and maturation signals are transduced for the dendritic cells. The heterogeneity of the pathogen-recognition-receptors and the microbial stimuli initiate a broad range of interactions between dendritic cells and infectious agents. Dendritic cells infected with certain viruses produce only a few infectious particles, but express and present viral antigens to T lymphocytes and immune response is initiated (influenza virus). Dendritic cells infected with certain pathogens not only initiate immune response but also disseminate the pathogen (human immunodeficiency virus, Mycobacterium tuberculosis). Some pathogens are killed in the dendritic cells, but the antigens are presented to the T cells, and immune responses are induced (Chlamydia trachomatis and Chlamydia psittaci). Dendritic cells capture antigens produced by infected neighbouring cells and present them to T lymphocytes, thus immune response is initiated (human cyto-megalovirus, herpes simplex virus). Dendritic cells are responsible for virus-induced immunosupp-ression; dendritic cells infected with certain pathogens form syncytia with T cells, thereby contribute to the suppression of T cell functions directed against opportunistic infections (measles virus). Dendritic cells can present not only foreign antigens but also self-antigens and when immature dendritic cells become mature upon exposure to inflammatory processes or to pathogens capable of activating them they can induce autoimmunity.]

Lege Artis Medicinae

[Preliminary concept of the bill on protecting personal genetic data, on genetic research, on genetic test, screening, and on the biobanks]

SÁNDOR Judit, KOSZTOLÁNYI György, FALUS ANDRÁS

Lege Artis Medicinae

[ANTICOAGULATION AND THROMBOEMBOLIC DISEASES - INDICATIONS, PROBLEMS AND PRACTICAL ASPECTS]

SAS Géza

[The widespread application of the LMW heparins promoted the prevention and therapy of the thromboembolic diseases in Hungary. Their propagation is mainly due to their simple clinical application and the active promotion of the producing pharmaceutical companies. However, the recommended “unnecessary” (in the reality the lack of) laboratory control may cause severe complications (bleeding, thromboembolism etc.) sometimes especially at the therapeutic application. For this reason, unfractionated (UF) heparin is advised in case of acute deep vein thrombosis when a patient is in the particular danger of bleeding because of its better controllability and the opportunity to stop anticoagulation immediately. In recent years, the indication of the long-term anticoagulation therapy expanded significantly. The number of patients is ever growing who need continuous anticoagulation because of atrial fibrillation or venous thromboembolic episode taken place earlier. Large randomised multicenter trials proved the efficacy of prolonged coumarin therapy in the prevention of recurrence of thromboembolic episodes in these diseases. Due to its advantageous pharmacological characteristics warfarin is especially suitable for the attainment of continuous anticoagulation. The direct thrombin inhibitor melagatran (and its orally applicable form, ximelagatran) may open a new era in the prophylaxis and therapy of the thromboembolic diseases. Its advantageous pharmacological characteristics and its simple application may make them to the antithrombotics of the future in case of a reasonable price and/or subsidisation.]

Lege Artis Medicinae

[THE IMPORTANCE OF HYPERTENSION IN CEREBROVASCULAR DISEASES]

SZAPÁRY László

[Stroke is a highly prevalent disorder worldwide; it is the third main cause of death and the leading cause of severe disability. Recent data showed that 72-86% of cerebrovascular disorders are of ischaemic type. Arterial hypertension is the most prevalent risk factor for both haemorrhagic and ischaemic stroke, it is present in approximately 70% of cases. All forms of hypertension, isolated systolic or diastolic and combined hypertension increase stroke risk about 3-4 times and the relationship with systolic blood pressure may even be stronger than with diastolic blood pressure. Hypertension is very common after acute stroke. In this phase the cerebral autoregulation is disturbed in the region of focal brain ischaemia or haemorrhage such that cerebral blood flow is directly dependent on systemic blood pressure. It is therefore essential to avoid systemic hypotension in acute stroke patients and the reduction of high blood pressure may lower cerebral blood flow in the ischemic penumbra. Evidence from clinical data shows that control of blood pressure leads to lower risk of first or reccurent stroke and patients have shown beneficial effects especially of ACE inhibitors and diuretics. In the PROGRESS study both hypertensive and non-hypertensive cerebrovascular patients benefited from antihypertensive therapy. Previous results suggests that there may be additional beneficial effects of the ACEinhibitor therapy not related to blood pressure lowering in the prevention of stroke.]

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Clinical Neuroscience

[What happens to vertiginous population after emission from the Emergency Department?]

MAIHOUB Stefani, MOLNÁR András, CSIKÓS András, KANIZSAI Péter, TAMÁS László, SZIRMAI Ágnes

[Background – Dizziness is one of the most frequent complaints when a patient is searching for medical care and resolution. This can be a problematic presentation in the emergency department, both from a diagnostic and a management standpoint. Purpose – The aim of our study is to clarify what happens to patients after leaving the emergency department. Methods – 879 patients were examined at the Semmel­weis University Emergency Department with vertigo and dizziness. We sent a questionnaire to these patients and we had 308 completed papers back (110 male, 198 female patients, mean age 61.8 ± 12.31 SD), which we further analyzed. Results – Based on the emergency department diagnosis we had the following results: central vestibular lesion (n = 71), dizziness or giddiness (n = 64) and BPPV (n = 51) were among the most frequent diagnosis. Clarification of the final post-examination diagnosis took several days (28.8%), and weeks (24.2%). It was also noticed that 24.02% of this population never received a proper diagnosis. Among the population only 80 patients (25.8%) got proper diagnosis of their complaints, which was supported by qualitative statistical analysis (Cohen Kappa test) result (κ = 0.560). Discussion – The correlation between our emergency department diagnosis and final diagnosis given to patients is low, a phenomenon that is also observable in other countries. Therefore, patient follow-up is an important issue, including the importance of neurotology and possibly neurological examination. Conclusion – Emergency diagnosis of vertigo is a great challenge, but despite of difficulties the targeted and quick case history and exact examination can evaluate the central or peripheral cause of the balance disorder. Therefore, to prevent declination of the quality of life the importance of further investigation is high.]

Clinical Neuroscience

[The role of sleep in the relational memory processes ]

CSÁBI Eszter, ZÁMBÓ Ágnes, PROKECZ Lídia

[A growing body of evidence suggests that sleep plays an essential role in the consolidation of different memory systems, but less is known about the beneficial effect of sleep on relational memory processes and the recognition of emotional facial expressions, however, it is a fundamental cognitive skill in human everyday life. Thus, the study aims to investigate the effect of timing of learning and the role of sleep in relational memory processes. 84 young adults (average age: 22.36 (SD: 3.22), 21 male/63 female) participated in our study, divided into two groups: evening group and morning group indicating the time of learning. We used the face-name task to measure relational memory and facial expression recognition. There were two sessions for both groups: the immediate testing phase and the delayed retesting phase, separated by 24 hours. 84 young adults (average age: 22.36 (SD: 3.22), 21 male/63 female) participated in our study, divided into two groups: evening group and morning group indicating the time of learning. We used the face-name task to measure relational memory and facial expression recognition. There were two sessions for both groups: the immediate testing phase and the delayed retesting phase, separated by 24 hours. Our results suggest that the timing of learning and sleep plays an important role in the stabilizing process of memory representation to resist against forgetting.]

Clinical Neuroscience

Life threatening rare lymphomas presenting as longitudinally extensive transverse myelitis: a diagnostic challenge

TOLVAJ Balázs, HAHN Katalin, NAGY Zsuzsanna, VADVÁRI Árpád, CSOMOR Judit, GELPI Ellen, ILLÉS Zsolt, GARZULY Ferenc

Background and aims – Description of two cases of rare intravascular large B-cell lymphoma and secondary T-cell lymphoma diagnosed postmortem, that manifested clinically as longitudinally extensive transverse myelitis (LETM). We discuss causes of diagnostic difficulties, deceptive radiological and histological investigations, and outline diagnostic procedures based on our and previously reported cases. Case reports – Our first case, a 48-year-old female was admitted to the neurological department due to paraparesis. MRI suggested LETM, but the treatments were ineffective. She died after four weeks because of pneumonia and untreatable polyserositis. Pathological examination revealed intravascular large B-cell lymphoma (IVL). Our second case, a 61-year-old man presented with headache and paraparesis. MRI showed small bitemporal lesions and lesions suggesting LETM. Diagnostic investigations were unsuccessful, including tests for possible lymphoma (CSF flow cytometry and muscle biopsy for suspected IVL). Chest CT showed focal inflammation in a small area of the lung, and adrenal adenoma. Brain biopsy sample from the affected temporal area suggested T-cell mediated lymphocytic (paraneoplastic or viral) meningoencephalitis and excluded diffuse large B-cell lymphoma. The symptoms worsened, and the patient died in the sixth week of disease. The pathological examination of the presumed adenoma in the adrenal gland, the pancreatic tail and the lung lesions revealed peripheral T-cell lymphoma, as did the brain and spinal cord lesions. Even at histological examination, the T-cell lymphoma had the misleading appearance of inflammatory condition as did the MRI. Conclusion – Lymphoma can manifest as LETM. In cases of etiologically unclear atypical LETM in patients older than 40 years, a random skin biopsy (with subcutaneous adipose tissue) from the thigh and from the abdomen is strongly recommended as soon as possible. This may detect IVL and provide the possibility of prompt chemotherapy. In case of suspicion of lymphoma, parallel examination of the CSF by flow cytometry is also recommended. If skin biopsy is negative but lymphoma suspicion remains high, biopsy from other sites (bone marrow, lymph nodes or adrenal gland lesion) or from a simultaneously existing cerebral lesion is suggested, to exclude or prove diffuse large B-cell lymphoma, IVL, or a rare T-cell lymphoma.

Clinical Neuroscience

Simultaneous subdural, subarachnoideal and intracerebral haemorrhage after rupture of a peripheral middle cerebral artery aneurysm

BÉRES-MOLNÁR Anna Katalin, FOLYOVICH András, SZLOBODA Péter, SZENDREY-KISS Zsolt, BERECZKI Dániel, BAKOS Mária, VÁRALLYAY György, SZABÓ Huba, NYÁRI István

The cause of intracerebral, subarachnoid and subdural haemorrhage is different, and the simultaneous appearance in the same case is extremely rare. We describe the case of a patient with a ruptured aneurysm on the distal segment of the middle cerebral artery, with a concomitant subdural and intracerebral haemorrhage, and a subsequent secondary brainstem (Duret) haemorrhage. The 59-year-old woman had hypertension and diabetes in her medical history. She experienced anomic aphasia and left-sided headache starting one day before admission. She had no trauma. A few minutes after admission she suddenly became comatose, her breathing became superficial. Non-contrast CT revealed left sided fronto-parietal subdural and subarachnoid and intracerebral haemorrhage, and bleeding was also observed in the right pontine region. The patient had leucocytosis and hyperglycemia but normal hemostasis. After the subdural haemorrhage had been evacuated, the patient was transferred to intensive care unit. Sepsis developed. Echocardiography did not detect endocarditis. Neurological status, vigilance gradually improved. The rehabilitation process was interrupted by epileptic status. Control CT and CT angiography proved an aneurysm in the peripheral part of the left middle cerebral artery, which was later clipped. Histolo­gical examination excluded mycotic etiology of the aneu­rysm and “normal aneurysm wall” was described. The brain stem haemorrhage – Duret bleeding – was presumably caused by a sudden increase in intracranial pressure due to the supratentorial space occupying process and consequential trans-tentorial herniation. This case is a rarity, as the patient not only survived, but lives an active life with some residual symptoms.

Clinical Neuroscience

[Health status and costs of ambulatory patients with multiple sclerosis in Hungary]

PÉNTEK Márta, GULÁCSI László, RÓZSA Csilla, SIMÓ Magdolna, ILJICSOV Anna, KOMOLY Sámuel, BRODSZKY Valentin

[Background and purpose - Data on disease burden of multiple sclerosis from Eastern-Central Europe are very limited. Our aim was to explore the quality of life, resource utilisation and costs of ambulating patients with multiple sclerosis in Hungary. Methods - Cross-sectional questionnaire survey was performed in two outpatient neurology centres in 2009. Clinical history, health care utilisation in the past 12 months were surveyed, the Expanded Disability Status Scale and the EQ-5D questionnaires were applied. Cost calculation was conducted from the societal perspective. Results - Sixty-eight patients (female 70.6%) aged 38.0 (SD 9.1) with disease duration of 7.8 (SD 6.7) years were involved. Fifty-five (80.9%) had relapsing-remitting form and 52 (76.5%) were taking immunomodulatory drug. The average scores were: Expanded Disability Status Scale 1.9 (SD 1.7), EQ-5D 0.67 (SD 0.28). Mean total cost amounted to 10 902 Euros/patient/year (direct medical 67%, direct nonmedical 13%, indirect costs 20%). Drugs, disability pension and informal care were the highest cost items. Costs of mild (Expanded Disability Status Scale 0-3.5) and moderate (Expanded Disability Status Scale 4.0-6.5) disease were 9 218 and 17 634 Euros/patient/year respectively (p<0.01), that is lower than results from Western European countries. Conclusion - Our study provides current inputs for policy making and contributes to understanding variation of costof- illness of multiple sclerosis in Europe.]