Journal of Nursing Theory and Practice

[Postoperative Pain Management Today in Hungary Part 1 ]

LOVASI Orsolya, LÁM Judit

OCTOBER 30, 2018

Journal of Nursing Theory and Practice - 2018;31(05)

[According to the results of relevant publications the practice for providing effective postoperative pain relief needs to be improved in Hungary. The inadequate pain management can occur several complications resulting prolonged recovery and increased cost of care. Providing adequate analgesia is not only a regulated activity, but a professional, ethical and moral obligation to diminish patients’ suffering. The current practice of pain management was evaluated in several Hungarian hospitals with questionnaires and interviews, analyzing the local pain protocols, and identifying the deeper causes of problems founded. After the comparison of our findings with the suggestions founded in the literature we identified numerous issues to be enhanced. The suggestions based on the results of our study are worth to be reconsidered to improve the current pain management practice of the health care providers performing surgical procedures. ]

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