Hypertension and nephrology

[Non-invasive evaluation of cardiovascular risk in pediatric chronic kidney disease patients]

BÁRCZI Adrienn1, DÉGI Arianna Amália1, KIS Éva2, REUSZ György1

OCTOBER 23, 2019

Hypertension and nephrology - 2019;23(05)

DOI: https://doi.org/10.33668/hn.23.022

[Cardiovascular diseases are the leading cause of mortality and morbidity in children with chronic kidney disease (CKD). Similar to adults, children with CKD experience a high burden of traditional and uremia-associated risk factors. Recent years, several studies were published in connection with cardiovascular risk factors, patomechanism, and early markers of cardiovascular diseases. Early signs of cardiomyopathy, such as left ventricular hypertrophy or dysfunction, and markers of atherosclerosis, such as increased intima-media thickness of the carotid artery or increased wall stiffness of the aorta are frequently present in early stages of CKD in children. As prevention is important in pediatrics, the evaluation of subtle changes of the cardiovascular system provide opportunity for early treatment and that enables children to develop normally and have a better long-term quality of life. Recently, newer non-invasive cardiovascular imaging modalities have been emerged to diagnose subclinical alterations of the heart and vessels in this specific population with kidney disease. In this review, we provide an overwiev of the emerging imaging techniques used to detect early subclinical organ damage in pediatric chronic kidney disease patients.]

AFFILIATIONS

  1. Semmelweis Egyetem, I. Sz. Gyermekgyógyászati Klinika, Budapest
  2. Gottsegen György Országos Kardiológiai Intézet, Budapest

COMMENTS

0 comments

Further articles in this publication

Hypertension and nephrology

[Report on the 56th Congress of the European Renal Association-European Dialysis and Transplant Association (ERA-EDTA) ]

HARIS Ágnes

Hypertension and nephrology

[GLP-1 receptor agonists in the treatment of type 2 diabetes]

WINKLER Gábor

[The glucagon-like peptide (GLP)-1 receptor agonists and somewhat later, the sodium-glucose cotransporter (SGLT) -2 inhibitors have brought new perspectives in the antihyperglycemic treatment of type 2 diabetes. The article overviews clinicopharmacologic characteristics of the GLP-1 receptor agonist group, their glycemic and non-glycemic effects, results of the cardiovascular endpoint studies as well as their place in the recent therapeutic guidelines. It is proven, that both glycemic and weight reducing effect is greater of the long-acting (non-prandial) coumpounds as compared to that of the short acting (prandial) derivates, further, that in studies with cardiovascular endpoints they reduced the relative risk of the composite endpoint of non-fatal myocardial infarct, non-fatal stroke and cardiovascular death. Due to the favolurable glycemic and non-glycemic properties their use is advised already in the early course of type 2 diabetes, as combination of the metformin therapy.]

Hypertension and nephrology

[When to Eat for Well-Being? ]

VÁLYI Péter

Hypertension and nephrology

[The importance of brain-derived neurotrophic factor in psychopathology and cardiovascular conditions: psychosomatic connections]

LÁSZLÓ Andrea, LÉNÁRT Lilla, ILLÉSY Lilla, FEKETE Andrea, NEMCSIK János

[Cardiovascular diseases and mood disorders are common public health problems worldwide. Their connections are widely studied, and the role of neurotrophins, especially brain derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) is already supposed in both conditions. However, no reviews are available describing possible associations between cardiovascular risk and mood disorders based on BDNF. Decreased level of BDNF is observed in depression and its connection to hypertension has also been demonstrated with affecting the arterial baroreceptors, reninangiotensin system and endothelial nitric oxide synthase activity. BDNF was also found to be the predictor of cardiovascular outcome in different patient populations. Our aim was to overview the present knowledge in this area demonstrating a new aspect of the associations between mood disorders and cardiovascular diseases through the mediation of BDNF. These findings might enlighten a new psychosomatic connection and suggest a new therapeutic target that is beneficial both in respect of mood disorders and cardiovascular pathology.]

Hypertension and nephrology

[Congress Report of the 27th Congress of the Hungarian Society of Hypertension ]

CSEPREKÁL Orsolya

All articles in the issue

Related contents

Clinical Neuroscience

Risk factors for ischemic stroke and stroke subtypes in patients with chronic kidney disease

GÜLER Siber, NAKUS Engin, UTKU Ufuk

Background - The aim of this study was to compare ischemic stroke subtypes with the effects of risk factors, the relationship between grades of kidney disease and the severity of stroke subtypes. Methods - The current study was designed retrospectively and performed with data of patients who were hospitalised due to ischemic stroke. We included 198 subjects who were diagnosed with ischemic stroke of Grade 3 and above with chronic kidney disease. Results - In our study were reported advanced age, coronary artery disease, moderate kidney disease as the most frequent risk factors for cardioembolic etiology. Hypertension, hyperlipidemia, smoking and alcohol consumption were the most frequent risk factors for large-artery disease. Female sex and anaemia were the most frequent risk factors for small-vessel disease. Dialysis and severe kidney disease were the most frequent risk factors in unknown etiologies, while male sex, diabetes mellitus, prior stroke and mild kidney disease were the most frequent risk factors for other etiologies. National Institute of Health Stroke Scale (NIHSS) scores were lower for small-vessel disease compared with other etiologies. This relation was statistically significant (p=0.002). Conclusion - In order to improve the prognosis in ischemic stroke with chronic kidney disease, the risk factors have to be recognised and the treatment options must be modified according to those risk factors.

Lege Artis Medicinae

[Notes on the management of hypertension in chronic kidney disease ]

AMBRUS Csaba

[The prevalence of hypertension among pa­tients with chronic kidney disease is high, reaching more than 80%. Hypertension is both one of the main causes and also the most common consequence of chronic kidney disease. It is also a main factor responsible for the high cardiovascular morbidity and mortality in this patient population. Blood pressure control can improve patient outcomes, lower cardiovascular risk and slow down the progression of kidney dis­ease, irrespective of the underlying cause. The optimal therapy should therefore focus not only on blood pressure reduction but also on renoprotection. Basic understanding of the renal pathophysiology in hypertension and renal effects of various medications is of paramount importance. In this review, we summarized cornerstones of the antihypertensive therapy in patients with chronic kidney disease. The management of patients receiving kidney replacement therapies, such as hemodialysis, peritoneal dialysis or transplanta­tion requires special knowledge and expe­rience, therefore it is not discussed here. The aim of this review was to allow non-nephrologist physicians to take care of their kidney patients with more confidence and effectiveness.]

Hypertension and nephrology

[Pathophysiology, measurement methods and prognostic role of arterial stiffness]

TIMÁR Orsolya, SOLTÉSZ Pál

[In the past decade, a novel property of circulation, arterial stiffness (or decreased arterial distensibility) began to recieve special attention. Three years ago, Hypertonia and Nephrologia has already reviewed the gathered information on the clinical significance of arterial stiffness, described two commonly used stiffness parameters, pulse wave velocity (PWV) and augmentation index (AIx), and assessed the relationship of arterial stiffness and the traditional risk factors. Recently, more and more clinical epidemiological studies provided evidence that the parameters quantifying arterial stiffness are more than innocent side effects of cardiovascular changes, as they can be linked to target organ damage and increased mortality. In the present study, we review the pathomechanism and current methods of measurement of decreased arterial compliance, we summarize the results of recently closed epidemiologic studies and finally, we will briefly discuss possible measures of arterial stiffness treatment.]

Hypertension and nephrology

[Terciary hyperparathyreosis or not? ? You cannot solve it alone: combined treatment in severe osteitis fibrosa cystica]

HERSZÉNYI Eszter, PATÓ Éva, SZALAY László, BÍRÓ Zsolt, György Andrea, DEÁK György

[Phosphate retention, consequential rise of the phosphaturic fibroblast growth factor-23 that decreases the level of calcitriol resulting in hypocalcemia facilitates the development of secondary hyperparathyroidism (sHPT) in chronic kidney disease (CKD). Hyperphosphatemia, hypocalcemia and low calcitriol level result in increasing secretion of parathormone (PTH). While sHPT occures frequently in CKD, the development of therapy-resistant and hypercalcemic tertiary hyperparathyroidism is rare due to current therapeutic approaches. We present the case of a 41 year old, treated schizophrenic, hemodialized male patient with severe osteitis fibrosa cystica, severe hyperparathyroidism (PTH 2500 pg/ml) - considered to be tertiary - and with repeated pathologic fractures. While hospitalized, the patient was under supervised, combined therapy with the vitamin D receptor activator paricalcitol and the calcimimetic cinacalcet that resulted in marked decrease of PTH level to 1589 pg/ml. However, after discharge from the hospital due to the lack of compliance he failed to take his medications and PTH had risen to the initial level. This case demonstrates that severe hyperparathyroidism thought to be therapy resistant responds well to a combination of paricalcitol and cinacalcet however, patient compliance is essential to therapeutic success.]

Lege Artis Medicinae

[Diseases of the kidneys due to non-cancer mortality characteristics of Hungary between 2005-2014]

PAKSY András, KISS István

[The authors review the time of 10 years between 2005-2014 concerning the development of the mortality rate of kidney diseases in Hungary. They’ve compared the Hungarian mortality data with the ones from three other countries, namely Austria, the Czech Republic and Germany. The analyses included kidney diseases originated from hypertension, glomerulonephritis and tubulointerstitial kidney diseases, kidney failure and polycystic kidney diseases. They weren’t concerned about kidney tumors or diabetes originated kidney diseases because of the lack of data concerning the latter. The mortality data were retrieved from the KSH Demography Yearbook and the European Detailed Mortality Data-base (DMDB). The statistically examined causes of death only add up to 1.2% of the total causes of death, but with the aging of the population this proportion will surely grow. During the last 10 years, the mortality of cardiovascular diseases decreased significantly, namely the mortality of ischaemic heart disease and stroke, but the mortality of hypertension increased. These processes can also be seen in Austria, the Czech Republic and Germany. The mortality connected to primal kidney diseases decisively concerns people aged over 70. The glomerular diseases’ standardized rate is significantly higher in Hungary than in the compared countries. The tubulointerstitial kidney diseases’ mortality rate decreased over the last 10 years and we are in the middle of the international field in this regard. During the evaluation of the mortality of kidney diseases it is important to consider that in the statistics every death can only have one cause nominated, which can be (correctly) the basic disease causing the kidney disease or in other cases the kidney disease itself. This problem makes it more difficult to compare data internationally. Only 20-30 patients die of acute kidney disease on a yearly basis which is a low mortality rate even by international standards but the above-mentioned problem still exists. Of all of them the chronic kidney disease is the most significant one and between 2005-2014 the number of deaths and their rate connected to it decreased, but with the aging of the population the morbidity of kidney diseases will surely increase. Analyzing the data of all the primer kidney diseases it can be determined that between 2005-2014 the mortality rate showed a decreasing tendency, so our international situation can be viewed positively. It is important to note though that the mortality of this disease type includes patients of lower average age in Hungary than in the more developed countries. The mortality rate of polycystic kidney disease hasn’t changed significantly during the past 10 years. Although some patients live to many years, the average age of the dead is significantly lower compared to the ones of other kidney disease types. The cases below the age of 1 year of the latter add up to 10%. The comparison between the countries concerning the po­lycystic kidney disease shows that the standardized mortality rate is higher in Hun­gary.]