Hypertension and nephrology

[Hyperkalaemia part 5]

DEÁK György1, PATÓ Éva1, KÉKES Ede2

NOVEMBER 04, 2020

Hypertension and nephrology - 2020;24(05)

AFFILIATIONS

  1. Uzsoki Utcai Kórház, III. Belgyógyászati-Nefrológiai Osztály, Budapest
  2. Pécsi Tudományegyetem, Klinikai Központ, I. Belgyógyászati Klinika, Kardiológiai Tanszék, Pécs

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Hypertension and nephrology

[Hypertension and Covid-19 - part II.]

SZÉKÁCS Béla, KÉKES Ede, NAGY Judit, KOVÁCS Tibor

[The authors review those components and mechanisms in the two major regulatory systems of circulation and inflammation-coagulation whose internal balance and interactions are pathologically altered during SARS-CoV-2 infection, thereby enhancing lung and systemic inflammation threatening to enter into severe clinical condition. They examine the question of how – in addition to potentially promoting the coronavirus cellular entry and penetration – the RAS inhibitor therapy affects these changes and whether can be supposed difference between the anti-/pro-inflammatory influence of ACEi and ARB treatment of old hypertensive patients representing a remarkably high proportion of victims in COVID-19 epidemic. The paper is focussing to the pathomechanical background of inflammation beyond the direct immunological response to the infection: to the significance of immunological alterations characterizing old hypertensive patients also in basic condition, and to the key components as angiotensin II, ACE2, angiotensin1-7, bradykinin, ARB and ACEi. In conclusion a consideration on optimal point of action is offered in RASi treated and SARS-CoV-2 infected (old) hypertensive patients.]

Hypertension and nephrology

[The role of stress management in the care of hypertension and the treatment of cardiovascular disease]

SOMOGYI Éva, KISS Zoltán, STAUDER Adrienne

[The aim of this paper is to give an overview of the relationship between stress and hypertension and cardiovascular diseases, furthermore to introduce an evidence based stress management intervention available in Hungary. The correlation between cardiovascular disease and psychosocial factors (including concomitant mental disorders as well as personality traits or the effect of social environment) has been established in numerous studies aimed at investigating pathogenesis or various clinical endpoints. The 2016 Guidelines of the European Society of Cardiology include the assessment and the management of psychosocial problems with behavioral medicine interventions as a I.A level recommendation. The implementation of these guidelines in everyday clinical practice is crucial to decrease cardiovascular risk. This involves the training of health care professionals, the facilitation of multidisciplinary collaboration and the integration of behavioral intervention into everyday care. The Williams Life Skills (WLS) program is an evidence based behavioral medicine intervention aiming to improve stress management and communication skills which implemented internationally and also available all over Hungary. It involves the learning of simple coping strategies that facilitate the successful management of every day psychosocial stress situations and the self-conscious reduction of bodily and psychological tensions. In cardiovascular disease, this improves quality of life and survival. The WLS program is especially recommended for healthcare workers to decrease the negative health consequences of their high stress load and to prevent burnout. Stress may affect both doctors and patients during their interactions. Bálint groups have a positive impact on the physician-patient collaboration and help to reduce burnout by improving the understanding of the diseases from a more complex approach.]

Hypertension and nephrology

[Covid-19 and the diabetes mellitus]

SIMONYI Gábor

[In late 2019 the epidemic of new coronavirus disease (Covid-19) from Wuhan, China, posed major challenges to the health systems of even the most developed countries. High mortality of the disease has been observed mainly in the elderly and in those with various cardiovascular and metabolic comorbidities. In this summary, the relationship between diabetes mellitus]

Hypertension and nephrology

[Some key presentations from the 57th (virtual) Congress of ERA / EDTA]

KOVÁCS Tibor

Hypertension and nephrology

[The ACE2-Ang(1-7)-Mas axis as a new option for lowering blood pressure]

KÉKES Ede

[The ACE2-Ang(1-7)-Mas axis counterbalances the ACE/Ang II-AT1R axis in our body in order to maintain normal homeostasis. During the Covid-19 pandemic, this protective system came to the fore again and its beneficial effects on the cardiovascular-metabolic system, including the significant antihypertensive effect, are being clarified. In our brief summary, we analyze the essential aspects of this research.]

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