Clinical Neuroscience

[The problems of the post-stroke care]

CSORNAI Márta

APRIL 20, 2002

Clinical Neuroscience - 2002;55(03-04)

[All patients having had stroke or TIA require special post-hospital care, being mainly the task of general pracititioners. The number of patients surviving stroke in Hungary is approximately 30 000/year. An important focus of care is secondary prevention: antithrombotic treatment and risk factors reduction. In case of residual signs of stroke, rehabilitation must also be organized and supported by the general practitioner. Medical conditions of cerebrovascular patients requiring special care demand are reviewed by the author. In this respect, some post-stroke conditions like dementia and depression require extra attention.]

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