Clinical Neuroscience

[The effect of anesthesia on cognitive functions]

BOCSKAI Tímea, KARÁDI Kázmér, BURIÁN András, KOVÁCS Norbert, BOGÁR Lajos, LUJBER László

JULY 30, 2016

Clinical Neuroscience - 2016;69(07-08)

DOI: https://doi.org/10.18071/isz.69.0255

[Aim of the study - General anesthetics, arterial hypotension and hypoxia developing during anesthesia may result in impaired memory and a decline in other abilities (such as attention, concentration, linguistic and writing abilities). Our aim was to detect changes in cognitive functions due to surgery and anesthesia with controlled arterial hypotension. Materials and methods - We studied combined and intravenous anesthesia detecting pre-and postoperative cognitive functions, intraoperative haemodynamic parameters, demographic data, other data of case history and surgical data. The Montreal Cognitive Assessment test was applied in the randomized, prospective study. The preoperative data served as basis for comparison. The second test was performed following surgery when patients were fully awake. Both groups included 30 patients. Results and conclusion - After both narcosis methods (postoperative second hour) cognitive functions were significantly deteriorated (p<0.05). Median MoCA before sevoflurane anesthesia was 24 points (interquartile range: 22-25), postoperative value was 20 (19-21) (p<0.05). Median MoCA before propofol anesthesia was 24 points (23-26), postoperative value was 20 (18-22) (p<0.01). Intraoperative arterial blood pressure, pulse rate and oxygen saturation values did not correlate with worsening of cognitive function (Pearson correlation coefficient values between -0.19 and 0.42). Execution is influenced by age (negative correlation) and education (positive correlation).]

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