Clinical Neuroscience

[Society of Környey’s Fellows]

CZOPF József

JUNE 20, 2003

Clinical Neuroscience - 2003;56(05-06)

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Clinical Neuroscience

[Abstracts of the 2nd Pannonian Symposium on CNS Injury]

Clinical Neuroscience

[Combined anterior and posterior approach to the tumours of the cervicothoracic junction: our experience]

BANCZEROWSKI Péter, LIPÓTH László, VERES Róbert

[Introduction - In the past, surgery of the pathologies of cervicothoracic junction carried high risk. Better knowledge of the anatomical situation and the increasing experience with anterior approach, corpectomy and spinal stabilization instruments have all made possible to remove the tumours of the cervicothoracic junction in a combined way. Case reports - The authors present six cases of spinal tumours where removal was done via anterior approach with partial clavicle and sternal resection. In two cases the anterior approach were combined with posterior tumour removal and fixation. Two of the cases were metastatic tumours, one lymphoma, one osteochondroma, one giant cell osteoid tumour and one malignant neurogenic tumour. The ventral approach gave a relatively wide window to explore the tumours and with the help of the operative microscope the tumour removal went fairly well. After total removal of the tumours the cervical spine were stabilized with own clavicle or iliac bone graft, titanium plate and screws. In patients with three-column involvement posterior fixation was made. The immediate recovery of the patients was well and there were no postoperative complications. Postoperative CT and MRI scans have great value in the early control after surgery as well as for the follow up of the patients. Conclusion - The anterior approach with partial clavicle and sternal resection combined with posterior approach and fixation seems to be feasible and safe method to explore and remove cervicothoracic junction pathologies.]

Clinical Neuroscience

[Asymptomatic ischemic cerebrovascular disorders and neuroprotection with vinpocetine]

HADJIEV Dimiter

[The asymptomatic ischemic cerebrovascular disorders (AICVD) is an early manifestation of cerebrovascular disease. It is also known as latent insufficiency of the cerebrovascular circulation or as asymptomatic cerebrovascular disorders. Recently, the term subclinical disease, detected noninvasively, has been introduced by American Heart Association. The diagnosis is based on the following criteria: evidence of vascular risk factors; episodic nonspecific complaints without any focal cerebral symptoms; mild cognitive deficit, detected by neuropsychological tests; carotid ultrasonography often shows intimal-medial thickening, atherosclerotic plaques and carotid stenosis; CT and MRI occasionally reveal silent cerebral infarctions, white matter hyperintensities or cerebral atrophy; regional hypoperfusion above the ischemic threshold is also seen by rCBF measurements. Treatment of the AICVD, modifying the vascular risk factors and using neuroprotective agents, should be the cornerstone of primary prevention of ischemic stroke and cognitive decline, caused by cerebrovascular disorders. Vinpocetine has been found to interfere with various stages of the ischemic cascade: ATP depletion, activation of voltagesensitive Na+- and Ca++-channels, glutamate and free radicals release. The inhibition of the voltage-sensitive Na+- channels appears to be especially relevant to the neuroprotective effect of vinpocetine. Pronounced antioxidant activity of the drug could also contribute to the neuroprotection. PET studies in primates and man showed that 11C labelled vinpocetine passes the blood-brain barrier rapidly. Heterogeneous brain distribution of the compound was observed mainly in the thalamus, basal ganglia, occipital, parietal and temporal cortex, regions which are closely related to the cognitive functions. PET studies in chronic ischemic stroke patients revealed favourable effects of vinpocetine on rCBF and glucose metabolism in the thalamus, basal ganglia and primary visual cortex. It seems, vinpocetine, affecting the multiple mechanisms of the AICVD, could be of benefit for the treatment in this early stage of cerebrovascular disease. Vinpocetine may also become a new therapeutic approach to prophylactic neuroprotection in patients at high risk of ischemic stroke.]

Clinical Neuroscience

[CONGRESS CALENDAR]

Clinical Neuroscience

[Is there any importance of the Leiden mutation in the pathogenesis of ischaemic stroke?]

PONGRÁCZ Endre, TORDAI Attila, CSORNAI Márta, BÉLA Zsuzsanna, NAGY Zoltán

[Background - There are conflicting data about the role of Leiden mutation in the pathogenesis of cerebral arterial thrombosis. In order to obtain relevant data, authors investigated the prevalency of factor V Leiden (A506G) both in healthy subjects and in a subgroup of ischaemic stroke patients. Matherial and methods - Blood samples of 171 healthy persons and 254 ischaemic stroke patients were examined by PCR method for Leiden mutation. Ischaemic lesions in the stroke group were documented by CT or MRI. A routin questionnaire was used to study the family history of vascular events (hypertension, diabetes, POAD, stroke, myocardial infarction) of patients. Conventional vascular risk factors of patients were also documented. Results - The prevalence of Leiden mutation was 7.2% in healthy persons and 11.9% in stroke patients. The OR for 254 patient was 1,45 (0.71-2.97). In the subgroup of young patients: age <50 (n=134) the OR was 1.67 (0.75-3.70) and in the elderly patients group: age >50 (n=120) the OR was 1.21 (0.50-2.89). In the family history of stroke patients having Leiden mutation (hetero- and homozigosity) the stroke prevalence was higher (p=0.01). In the ischaemic stroke group, age<50 with polymorphism a tight correlation with hyperlipidaemia (p=0.03) was found. In the group of age<50 with heterozigosity for Leiden, a lower plasma fibrinogen concentration (p=0.02) was found. The polymorphism showed no correlation with the hypertension, hyperuricaemia, migraine, diabetes mellitus, smoking, alcohol consumption and CDS status of patients. Conclusion - When comparing stroke patients to control population there is no significant increase in the frequency of Leiden mutation. Leiden mutation together with hyperlipidaemia and stroke in the family history results in high risk for ischaemic stroke in young patients.]

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Clinical Neuroscience

Evaluation of anxiety, depression and marital relationships in patients with migraine

DEMIR Fıgen Ulku, BOZKURT Oya

Aim - The aim of this study was to evaluate the frequency and characteristics of attacks in patients with migraine, to determine the effects of anxiety or depressive symptoms, and to evaluate the marital relationships of patients with migraine. Method - Thirty patients who were admitted to the neurology outpatient clinic of our hospital between July 2018 and October 2018 and were diagnosed with migraine according to the 2013 International Headache Society (IHS) diagnostic criteria were included in this cross-sectional study. Age, sex, headache frequency and severity, depressive traits, marital satisfaction and anxiety status were examined. We used the Beck Depression Inventory (BDI), State-Trait Anxiety Inventory (STAI), Maudsley Marital Questionnaire (MMQ) and Visual Analogue Scale (VAS) for measuring relevant parameters. Results - The mean severity of migraine pain according to VAS scale was 6.93 ± 1.41 and the mean number of migraine attacks was 4.50 ± 4.24. The mean BDI score of the patients was 12.66 ± 8.98, the mean MMQ-M score was 19.80 ± 12.52, the mean MMQ-S score was 13.20 ± 9.53, the mean STAI-state score was 39.93 ± 10.87 and the mean STAI-trait score was 45.73 ± 8.96. No significant correlation was found between age, number of migraine attacks, migraine duration, migraine headache intensity, and BDI, STAI and MMQ scores (p>0.05). But there was a positive correlation between MMQ-S and scores obtained from the BDI and STAI-state scales (p<0.05). Conclusion - In this study more than half of the migraine patients had mild, moderate or severe depression. A positive correlation was found between sexual dissatisfaction and scale scores of depression and anxiety.

Clinical Neuroscience

[Account on the scientific meeting of Környey Society in 2010. Part 2.]

Hungarian Radiology

[Scientific conference of Transylvanian Society and Museum]

WENINGER Csaba

Hypertension and nephrology

[The 27th Great Assembly of the Hungarian Society of Nephrology]

LAM Extra for General Practicioners

[VITAMIN D TREATMENT: HORMONE THERAPY FOR PATIENTS WHO NEED IT OR SIMPLY A SUPPLEMENTATION FOR EVERYONE?]

SPEER Gábor

[Various medical associations issue different recommendations for the prevention and treatment of vitamin D deficiency. These significant differences are partly explained by the different definition of normal vitamin D level and the use of completely different mathematical models to predict the increase in vitamin D level as a response to therapy. According to the Institute of Medicine (IOM), the target vitamin D level is 20 ng/ml, whereas the Endocrine Society (ES) recommends 30 ng/m as the miminum target value. According to the ES, a 1 ng/ml increase of vitamin D level can be reached by a daily intake of 100 NE, while the IOM recommends 3.6 ng/ml. Moreover, the IOM states that the effect of therapy on serum level is nonlinear. These differences show that the ES and IOM have different views on the risk of adverse effects. The IOM recommends 400 IU vitamin D daily for children younger than 1 year, 800 IU for those above 70 years and 600 IU/per day for everyone else. The ES recommend 400-1000 IU daily for all infants and 1500- 2000 IU for adults. Screening, however, is not recommended by either society. To decrease uncertainty concerning the side effects of higher-dose vitamin D treatment, it is important to understand, use and support the function of the pharmacovigilance system of the pharmaceutical industry that manufactures and markets various (prescription, over-the-counter) preparations. This is what the author aims to highlight in the second part of this article. Using this system, both the doctor and the patient can help support and accept the justification of higher-dose vitamin D therapy.]