Clinical Neuroscience

Rare complication of West Nile viral encephalitis

FARAGÓ Péter 1, FRICSKA-NAGY Zsanett1, KLIVÉNYI Péter 1, TAJTI János 1

NOVEMBER 30, 2021

Clinical Neuroscience - 2021;74(11-12)

DOI: https://doi.org/10.18071/isz.74.0430

Case Reports

In our case report, we are presenting a 72 years old male patient. The patient’s symptoms were fever, dizziness, general weakness at the time of admission. The laboratory and CSF tests revealed central nervous system inflammation. West Nile virus was identified from the cerebrospinal fluid. After the symptoms of infection and during supporting treatment, severe, progressing hyponatremia evolved with unknown pathology. According to previous investigations and our diagnostic and therapeutic algorithm cerebral salt wasting syndrome identified as occasion.

AFFILIATIONS

  1. Department of Neurology, Albert Szent-Györgyi Clinical Center, University of Szeged, Szeged

COMMENTS

0 comments

Further articles in this publication

Clinical Neuroscience

Fluoxetine use is associated with improved survival of patients with COVID-19 pneumonia: A retrospective case-control study

NÉMETH Klára Zsófia, SZÛCS Anna , VITRAI József , JUHÁSZ Dóra , NÉMETH Pál János , HOLLÓ András

We aimed to investigate the association between fluoxetine use and the survival of hospitalised coronavirus disease (COVID-19) pneumonia patients. This retrospective case-control study used data extracted from the medical records of adult patients hospitalised with moderate or severe COVID-19 pneumonia at the Uzsoki Teaching Hospital of the Semmelweis University in Budapest, Hungary between 17 March and 22 April 2021. As a part of standard medical treatment, patients received anti-COVID-19 therapies as favipiravir, remdesivir, baricitinib or a combination of these drugs; and 110 of them received 20 mg fluoxetine capsules once daily as an adjuvant medication. Multivariable logistic regression was used to evaluate the association between fluoxetine use and mortality. For excluding a fluoxetine-selection bias potentially influencing our results, we compared baseline prognostic markers in the two groups treated versus not treated with fluoxetine. Out of the 269 participants, 205 (76.2%) survived and 64 (23.8%) died between days 2 and 28 after hospitalisation. Greater age (OR [95% CI] 1.08 [1.05–1.11], p<0.001), radiographic severity based on chest X-ray (OR [95% CI] 2.03 [1.27–3.25], p=0.003) and higher score of shortened National Early Warning Score (sNEWS) (OR [95% CI] 1.20 [1.01-1.43], p=0.04) were associated with higher mortality. Fluoxetine use was associated with an important (70%) decrease of mortality (OR [95% CI] 0.33 [0.16–0.68], p=0.002) compared to the non-fluoxetine group. Age, gender, LDH, CRP, and D-dimer levels, sNEWS, Chest X-ray score did not show statistical difference between the fluoxetine and non-fluoxetine groups supporting the reliability of our finding. Provisional to confirmation in randomised controlled studies, fluoxetine may be a potent treatment increasing the survival for COVID-19 pneumonia.

Clinical Neuroscience

Atypical presentation of late-onset Sandhoff disease: a case report

SALAMON András , SZPISJAK László , ZÁDORI Dénes, LÉNÁRT István, MARÓTI Zoltán, KALMÁR Tibor , BRIERLEY M. H. Charlotte, DEEGAN B. Patrick , KLIVÉNYI Péter

Sandhoff disease is a rare type of hereditary (autosomal recessive) GM2-gangliosidosis, which is caused by mutation of the HEXB gene. Disruption of the β subunit of the hexosaminidase (Hex) enzyme affects the function of both the Hex-A and Hex-B isoforms. The severity and the age of onset of the disease (infantile or classic; juvenile; adult) depends on the residual activity of the enzyme. The late-onset form is characterized by diverse symptomatology, comprising motor neuron disease, ataxia, tremor, dystonia, psychiatric symptoms and neuropathy. A 36-year-old female patient has been presenting progressive, symmetrical lower limb weakness for 9 years. Detailed neurological examination revealed mild symmetrical weakness in the hip flexors without the involvement of other muscle groups. The patellar reflex was decreased on both sides. Laboratory tests showed no relevant alteration and routine electroencephalography and brain MRI were normal. Nerve conduction studies and electromyography revealed alterations corresponding to sensory neuropathy. Muscle biopsy demonstrated signs of mild neurogenic lesion. Her younger brother (32-year-old) was observed with similar symptoms. Detailed genetic study detected a known pathogenic missense mutation and a 15,088 base pair long known pathogenic deletion in the HEXB gene (NM_000521.4:c.1417G>A; NM_000521:c.-376-5836_669+1473del; double heterozygous state). Segregation analysis and hexosaminidase enzyme assay of the family further confirmed the diagnosis of late-onset Sandhoff disease. The purpose of this case report is to draw attention to the significance of late-onset Sandhoff disease amongst disorders presenting with proximal predominant symmetric lower limb muscle weakness in adulthood.

Clinical Neuroscience

Cholinesterase inhibitors and memantine for the treatment of Alzheimer and non-Alzheimer dementias

BALÁZS Nóra , BERECZKI Dániel, KOVÁCS Tibor

In aging societies, the morbidity and mortality of dementia is increasing at a significant rate, thereby imposing burden on healthcare, economy and the society as well. Patients’ and caregivers’ quality of life and life expectancy are greatly determined by the early diagnosis and the initiation of available symptomatic treatments. Cholinesterase inhibitors and memantine have been the cornerstones of Alzheimer’s therapy for approximately two decades and over the years, more and more experience has been gained on their use in non-Alzheimer’s dementias too. The aim of our work was to provide a comprehensive summary about the use of cholinesterase inhibitors and memantine for the treatment of Alzheimer’s and non-Alzheimers’s dementias.

Clinical Neuroscience

[Effective therapy in highly active pediatric multiple sclerosis ]

MERÔ Gabriella, MÓSER Judit, LIPTAI Zoltán, DIÓSZEGHY Péter, BESSENYEI Mónika, CSÉPÁNY Tünde

[Multiple sclerosis (MS) is typically a disease of young adults. Childhood MS can be defined in patients under 18 years of age, although some authors set the limit un­der the age of 16 formerly known as “early-onset multiple sclerosis” or “juvenile multiple sclerosis”, seen in 3-5% of all MS patients. Nowadays, owing to ever-evolving, better diagnostic tools and well-traced, strictly defined diagnostic criteria, childhood MS is showing an increasing incidence worldwide (0.05-2.85/100 000). MS is characterized by recurrent episodes of the central nervous system with demyelination separated in space and time. In childhood almost exclusively the relapsing-remitting (RR) type of MS occurs. Based on experience in adults, the goal in the pediatric population is also the early diagnosis, to initiate adequate DMT as soon as possible and to achieve symptom relief and good quality of life. Based on efficacy and safety studies in the adult population, inter­feron β-1a and glatiramer acetate were first approved by the FDA and EMA for the treatment of childhood MS also. The increased relapse rate and rapid progression of childhood MS and unfavorable therapeutic response to nearly 45% of the first DMT necessitated the testing of more effective and second-line drugs in the population under 18 years of age (PARADIGMS, CONNECT). Although natalizumab was reported to be effective and well-tolerated in highly active RRMS in childhood, evidence based studies were not yet available when our patients’ treatment started. In this article, we report on the successful treatment of three active RRMS patients with individually authorized off-label use of natalizumab.]

Clinical Neuroscience

[Relationships between COVID-19 disease, nutritional status, and dysphagia, particularly in stroke patients ]

KOVÁCS Andrea, SZABÓ Pál Tamás, FOLYOVICH András

[The new coronavirus, SARS-CoV-2, which causes the COVID-19 disease can lead to severe acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS). It poses a serious challenge to the health care system, especially intensive care. Neurological patients, usually of advanced age and with a myriad of comorbidities, are at particular risk through the impact of the new coronavirus on their condition and nutritional capacity. Stroke is a leader in morbidity and mortality data, with a focus on dysphagia and its complications due to COVID-19 disease and acute cerebrovascular accident. In the acute phase of stroke, 30-50% of patients suffer from dysphagia, which still shows a prevalence of 10% six months later. Dysphagia results in decreased or insufficient fluid and nutrient uptake, supp­lemented by inactivity, leading to malnutrition and sarcopenia, which worsens overall condition, outcome, and rehabilitation efficiency. Screening and early detection of swallowing disorders is a fundamental issue in order to develop a personalized and timely-initiated nutritional therapy strategy. Nutritional therapy plays a key role in frequent intensive care due to COVID-19 disease, where it increases the chances of recovery and reduces the length of stay in the intensive care unit and mortality. This is especially true in critically ill patients requiring prolonged ventilation. In COVID-19 diagnosed patients, screening for dysphagia, bedside assessment, and instrumental examination, followed by swallowing rehabilitation, are of paramount importance. Stroke can also be a complication of the COVID-19 infection. Care for cerebrovascular patients has also adapted to the pandemic, “triazination” has become systemic, and dysphagia screening for stroke patients and nutritional therapy adapted to it have also shed new light. ]

All articles in the issue

Related contents

Clinical Neuroscience

[Covid-19 associated neurological disorders]

SZÔTS Mónika, PÉTERFI Anna, GERÖLY Júlia, NAGY Ferenc

[The clinical signs of SARS-CoV-2 infection has become more recognisable in recent times. In addition to common symptoms such as fever, cough, dyspnea, pneumonia and ageusia, less common complications can be identified, including many neurological manifestations. In this paper, we discuss three Covid-19 associated neurological disorders (Case 1: Covid-19 encephalitis, Case 2: Covid-19 organic headache, Case 3: SARS-CoV-2-infection and ischaemic stroke). We emphasize in our multiple case study that during the present pandemic, it is especially important for neurologists to be aware of the nervous system complications of the virus infection, thus saving unnecessary examinations and reducing the frequency of patients’ contact with health care personnel. ]

Lege Artis Medicinae

[Neurological complications of COVID-19]

LAMBERTUS Iván, DOBRONYI Levente, BERECZKI Dániel, KOVÁCS Tibor

[The SARS-CoV-2 virus of COVID-19 is present in all countries of the world by 2021 causing primarily respiratory symptoms by penumonia with severe respiratory failure. Since the early stages of the pandemic, there were published case reports and comprehensive clinical studies about the neurological symptoms and complications of the infection (e.g. myalgia, anosmia, ageusia, encephalitis, encephalopathy, cerebrovascular conditions, Guillain-Barré syndrome and specific neuropathies). As it is well known, drugs used in therapeutic research may also have neurological adverse effects. Our summary aims to provide a practical overview of domestic and international literature about the already known neurological complications of SARS-CoV-2 infection.]

Lege Artis Medicinae

[SEVERE CASE OF HYPOSMOTIC HYPERVOLAEMIA DUE TO WATER INTOXICATION]

BOTOS Péter, MARTON Sándor, KISS Katalin, KOZMA Zsolt, GION Gábor

[INTRODUCTION - The regulation of fluid and electrolite homeostasis is of crucial importance to maintain the normal biochemical processes of the body. Any sudden and remarkable change in the salt and water metabolism may result in serious consequences. CASE REPORT - In the case report the authors describe the history of a 17 old patient, who was admitted to the Emergency Department following seizures, with mental confusion, hyperpyrexia and hyponatremia. CONCLUSION - The aim of the authors was to present a severe case of hyposmolar hypervolaemia of uncommon etiology. They focus on the importance of the anamnestic history emphasizing the significance of diffrential diagnosis and demonstrate the therapeutic considerations.]

Clinical Neuroscience

[Mild encephalitis/encephalopathy with a reversible splenial lesion in children]

LIPTAI Zoltán, IVÁDY Balázs, BARSI Péter, VÁRALLYAY György, RUDAS Gábor, FOGARASI András

[Authors, most of them Japanese, have recently published an increasing number of articles on mild encephalitis/encephalopathy with a reversible splenial lesion. We report on two new white European patients and compare published data with our own observations. A 15- year-old girl developed headache, fever, dizziness, vomiting and nuchal rigidity over four days. CSF showed elevated protein and cell count, with the lowest serum Na being 131 mmol/L. MRI on day seven was normal, but she remained febrile, had cerebral edema and episodes of confusion. MRI on day 11 showed a small T2-hyperintense lesion with restricted diffusion in the callosal splenium. Adenoviral infection was proved, and the girl underwent a protracted course of recovery. MRI signal changes improved in six days and disappeared after four months. A 12.5-year-old girl developed headache, lethargy, drowsiness and vomiting. On day five she experienced right-sided numbness, weakness and inability to speak which lasted 12 hours. She was confused and disoriented. MRI disclosed a tiny area of increased T2- signal and restricted diffusion in the splenium. Serum Na was 133 mmol/L, CSF cell count and protein was markedly elevated, and enteroviral infection was detected. Echocardiography showed no changes predisposing to clot formation and no thrombophilia was found. Her symptoms resolved in a week and MRI was normal two months later. These two non-epileptic children increase the small number of white European patients with MERS reported so far. Both had hyponatremia and encephalitis and patient 2 had transient ischemic attack, possibly due to the cerebral edema also resulting in the splenial lesion.]

Journal of Nursing Theory and Practice

[Importance of the Hyponatraemia in the Emergency Care]

PÓHR Kitti, KÖCSE Tamás, MESTERHÁZI András, BIERER Gábor, KARAMÁNNÉ Pakai Annamária

[The aim of the study: Hyponatraemia is the most common electrolyte abnormality in hospitalized patients. Certain drugs (eg, diuretics, antidepressants, and antiepileptics) have been implicated as established causes of either asymptomatic or symptomatic hyponatraemia. Studies proved correlation between hyponatremia and hospital mortality. Hyponatraemia remains asymptomatic in most cases, but if left untreated, it can cause life-threatening situations. Our aim was to examine the frequency of hyponatraemia in our hospital and its impact on the emergency care. Methods: A total of 75 patients were enrolled in the study with purposive sampling. We used descriptive and mathematical statistics with SPSS 22.0 software package for processing non-parametric statistical data. Results: Patients transferred by ambulance or arriving at the ER department came with dizziness, vomiting / diarrhea symptoms. Admission causes, were characteristic symptoms of hyponatraemia as well as non-specific neurological symptoms (headache, dizziness, confusion, unconsciousness) were found (n = 29). In addition, a common complaint of vomiting / diarrhea (n = 12), abdominal pain (n = 10). In particular, the complaint leading to a significant proportion of patients with hyponatraemia was not typical, but it was kind of trauma (n = 12). Nearly half of the patients (n = 36) were revenant. The most common diagnosis was hypertension (34%). 52% were taking medication that typically cause hyponatraemia. There were significant increase in the incidence of hyponatraemia in cases where the patient was taking diuretics. Conclusions: The diagnosis of hyponatraemia is based on the recording history, physical examination, and laboratory tests. Preventive approach would reduce the number of hospital stays due to hyponatraemia, and this may indeed improve patients’ life expectancy. The disease itself is easily remedied, it can cause critical condition due to disregard.]