Clinical Neuroscience

[Natalizumab in multiple sclerosis]

RAJDA Cecília, BENCSIK Krisztina

MAY 30, 2008

Clinical Neuroscience - 2008;61(05-06)

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Clinical Neuroscience

[Asymmetric dimethil-arginine (ADMA) as a link between insulin resistance and atherosclerosis]

ZSUGA Judit

Clinical Neuroscience

[Affective and cognitive decision making in major depression: influence of the prefrontal cortex, serotonin transporter genotype and personality traits]

MUST Anita, HORVÁTH Szatmár, JANKA Zoltán

[Patients with major depressive disorder (MDD) show neuropsychological impairments, including deficient executive functions and suboptimal decision-making strategies, which are mediated by several brain regions. In the development of these symptoms the pathology of the prefrontal cortex (PFC), including the dorsolateral, ventromedial and orbitofrontal regions, may also play an important role. Neuropsychological assessment is a useful tool in detecting and measuring these deficiencies, showing that patients with MDD exhibit altered sensitivity to reward and punishment. However, impairment of emotional decisionmaking strategies in MDD is influenced by genetic variations (5-HTTLPR polymorphism) and personality traits, which seem to have a higher predictive value on decision making performance than the clinical symptoms.]

Clinical Neuroscience

[IMPROVING FUNCTIONAL ELECTRICAL STIMULATION DRIVEN CYCLING BY PROPER SYNCHRONIZATION OF THE MUSCLES]

PILISSY Tamás, KLAUBER András, FAZEKAS Gábor, LACZKÓ József, JOHANN Szécsi

[Our aim is to define optimal stimulation patterns for controlling lower limb movements of spinal cord injured patients. Here we report on a study about cycling movements of healthy subjects under regular conditions and spinal cord injured patients whose cycling movement was generated by functional electrical stimulation. The stimulation pattern required for coordinated activities of lower limb muscles of spinal cord injured patients was improved by using the observations what we gained from measuring and analyzing cycling movements of 42 young healthy subjects. Kinematical parameters (joint angles) and muscle activities (EMG) were recorded simultaneously by an ultrasound based movement analyzing system. We replaced the cycling program of the commercially available stimulator with a new one that we developed on the basis of the measured healthy cycling movements. We present that our new stimulation patterns provided a great increase in the performance of our spinal cord injured patients.]

Clinical Neuroscience

[Current practice of antithrombotic treatment in ischemic stroke: a survey among Hungarian neurologists (in English language)]

SZTRIHA K. László, VÉCSEI László

[Background and purpose - Large multicenter trials have already evaluated the relative benefit of various types of antithrombotic medication in ischemic stroke. However, the application of the trial results still remains uncertain in some clinical situations. We set out to evaluate the various aspects of antithrombotic treatment use among clinical practitioners. Methods - A virtually nationwide survey was performed among Hungarian neurologists involved in stroke care, who responded to a questionnaire concerning the use of antiplatelet agents and anticoagulation in acute ischemic stroke and for secondary prevention. Results - The response rate was 65%. Most (69%) practitioners always wait for brain imaging before initiating antithrombotic treatment in acute stroke. Aspirin (100 mg/ day) is the most frequently prescribed antiplatelet agent after a first ischemic episode. Common reasons for the prescription of alternative agents instead of aspirin after a first attack include high-risk cases and intolerance or allergy to aspirin. The results of in vitro platelet aggregation studies frequently influence drug selection. If an event recurs during a given antiplatelet treatment, most neurologists change the medication. Some participants reported the administration of anticoagulation, or of the combination of aspirin plus clopidogrel in certain situations that are not cardiological indications. Conclusions - This study provides information on the use of antithrombotic treatment in general neurological practice, including everyday clinical situations where no help is available from guidelines.]

Clinical Neuroscience

[Schaffer Károly Prize, 2008]

CONSTANTINOVITS Györgyi

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Clinical Neuroscience

Isolated hypoglossal nerve palsy due to a jugular foramen schwannoma

ÖZTOP-CAKMAK Özgür, VANLI-YAVUZ Ebru, AYGÜN Serhat, BASTAN Birgül, EGEMEN Emrah, SOLAROGLU Ihsan, GURSOY-OZDEMIR Yesemin

Introduction – Although the involvement of the hypoglossal nerve together with other cranial nerves is common in several pathological conditions of the brain, particularly the brainstem, isolated hypoglossal nerve palsy is a rare condition and a diagnostic challenge. Case presentation – The presented patient arrived to the hospital with a history of slurred speech and an uncomfortable sensation on his tongue. Neurological examination showed left-sided hemiatrophy of the tongue with fasciculations and deviation towards the left side during protrusion. Based on the clinical and MRI findings, a diagnosis of hypoglossal nerve schwannoma was made. Discussion – Hypoglossal nerve palsy may arise from multiple causes such as trauma, infections, neoplasms, and endocrine, autoimmune and vascular pathologies. In our case, the isolated involvement of the hypoglossal nerve was at the skull base segment, where the damage to the hypoglossal nerve may occur mostly due to metastasis, nasopharyngeal carcinomas, nerve sheath tumors and glomus tumors. Conclusion – Because of the complexity of the region’s anatomy, the patient diagnosed with hypoglossal nerve schwannoma was referred for gamma knife radiosurgery.

Clinical Neuroscience

The methylation status of NKCC1 and KCC2 in the patients with refractory temporal lobe epilepsy

UNAL Yasemin, KARA Murat, GENC Fatma, OZTURK Aslan Dilek, GÖMCELI Bicer Yasemin, KAYNAR Taner, TOSUN Kursad, KUTLU Gülnihal

Purpose - Methylation is a key epigenetic modification of DNA and regarding its impact on epilepsy, it is argued that “DNA methylation may play an important role in seizure susceptibility and maintenance of the disorder”. DNA methylation status of KCC2 (SCL12A5) and NKCC1 (SCL12A2) associated with refractory temporal lobe epilepsy was investigated in our study. Materials and methods - Thirty-eight patients with temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE) who were diagnosed by video EEG monitoring and 32 healthy control subjects were included in the study. Twenty-three patients in TLE group were men and the remaining 15 were women. Among them, 27 had unilateral temporal focus (9 with right; 18 with left) and 11 patients had bilateral TLE. We analyzed promoter region methylation status of the KCC2 (SCL12A5) and NKCC1 (SCL12A2) genes in the case and control groups. Gene regions of interest were amplified through PCR and sequencing was accomplished with pyro-sequencing. Results - We found a significant relationship between TLE and methylation on the NKCC1. However, there was no association between TLE and methylation on the KCC2 gene. Also, we found no association between right or left and unilateral or bilateral foci of TLE. There was no relationship between TLE and methylation on the NKCC1and KCC2 genes in terms of mesial temporal sclerosis in cranial MRI, head trauma or febrile convulsions. Conclusion - The methylation of NKCC1 can be a mecha­nism of refractory temporal lobe epilepsy. There are limited findings about DNA methylation in TLE. Therefore, further studies with large sample sizes are necessary.

Clinical Neuroscience

Investigation of risk factors, topographic location and stroke mechanisms of unilateral isolated and posterior cerebral ARTERY thalamic infarcts

GÖKCAL Elif, SENGUL Yildizhan, USLU Ilgen Ferda

Aim - In this study, we aimed to examine the risk factors, topographic features and stroke mechanisms of acute ischemic unilateral infarcts of thalamus. Methods - Patient with isolated thalamic infarct and those with posterior cerebral artery (PCA) infarction who were admitted to our hospital between January 2014 and January 2017 with acute unilateral thalamic infarction (TI) were included in this study (isolated thalamic infarction/ isolated TI; thalamic and posterior cerebral artery infarction/PCA+TI). Demographic characteristics and vascular risk factors of the patients were determined. Thalamic infarct areas were recorded topographically as anterior, posteromedial, ventrolateral, posterolateral, more than one area, and variant areas. Stroke mechanism was determined according to the criteria of „Trial of Org 10172 in Acute Stroke Treatment” (TOAST). Patients with isolated TI and PCA TI were compared according to risk factors, stroke mechanism and infarct topography. Results - Forty-three patients with a mean age of 63.3 ± 14.5 years were included in the study. Twenty-eight patients (60.1%) were found to have isolated TI and the remaining 15 patients (34.9%) had PCA+TI. 32.1% of patients with isolated TI had sensory symptoms on presentation, and 60% of patients with PCA-TI had sensorimotor symptoms. The mean age, the mean score on National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale (NIHSS) and the mean frequency of atrial fibrillation were higher in PCA+TI patients than in isolated-TI patients (p: 0.04, p: 0.004, p: 0.02 respectively). 32.6% of the patients had ventrolateral, 30.2% had posteromedial involvement. Ventrolateral topography was seen in 46.7% of the PCA+TI patients, while posteromedial topography was seen in 39.3% of the isolated-TI patients. 53.6% of the isolated-TI had small vessel disease etiology, while 40% of the PCA+TI had cardioembolic etiology, and the other 40% had large artery atherosclerosis. Conclusion - Our study showed that the most ommon stroke mechanism in patients with thalamic infarction is the small vessel disease. Isolated TI and PCA+TI patients differ in terms of etiologic mechanism and infarct topography. Variant territorial involvement and multiple area involvements can be quite common in thalamic infarcts.

Clinical Neuroscience

[Sturge Weber type 3 presenting with occipital epileptic seizure: case report ]

SERİNDAĞ Cansu Helin, EREN Fulya, KARAHAN Gökçen Muazzez, GUL Gunay, SELCUK Hakan, KARA Batuhan, SOYSAL Aysun

[Sturge Weber syndrome is the third most common neurocutaneous syndrome after neurofibromatosis and tuberous sclerosis. Three distinct types were identified. Type 3 with leptomeningeal involvement alone is the rarest among other types. The reported case is a 21-years-old female patient without any known chronic disease. She admitted to the emergency department after visual symptoms and headache, followed by generalized tonic clonic seizure. EEG of the patient showed left occipital seizure activity. The contrast enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) showed left occipital leptomeningeal angioma. Digital substraction angiography (DSA) revealed minimal blushed contrast enhancement on late venous phase and lack of superficial cortical veins. Her focal seizures were under control with levatiracetam and lacosamide treatment. The reported case is unique because of the late onset presentation with focal seizure without mental retardation.]

Clinical Neuroscience

[Family planning in multiple sclerosis: conception, pregnancy, breastfeeding]

RÓZSA Csilla

[Family planning is an exceptionally important question in multiple sclerosis, as women of childbearing age are the ones most often affected. Although it is proven that pregnancy does not worsen the long-term prognosis of relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis, many patients are still doubtful about having children. This question is further complicated by the fact that patients – and often even doctors – are not sufficiently informed about how the ever-increasing number of available disease-modifying treatments affect pregnancies. Breastfeeding is an even less clear topic. Patients usually look to their neurologists first for answers concerning these matters. It falls to the neurologist to rationally evaluate the risks and benefits of contraception, pregnancy, assisted reproduction, childbirth, breastfeeding and disease modifying treatments, to inform patients about these, and then together come to a decision about the best possible therapeutic approach, taking the patients’ individual family plans into consideration. Here we present a review of relevant literature adhering to international guidelines on the topics of conception, pregnancy and breastfeeding, with a special focus on the applicability of approved disease modifying treatments during pregnancy and breastfeeding. The goal of this article is to provide clinicians involved in the care of MS patients with up-to-date information that they can utilize in their day-to-day clinical practice. ]