Clinical Neuroscience

[MOVEMENT-RELATED BETA RESPONSES IN ESSENTIAL TREMOR AND PARKINSON’S DISEASE]

GERTRÚD Tamás, PÁLVÖLGYI László, TAKÁTS Annamária, SZIRMAI Imre, KAMONDI Anita

NOVEMBER 30, 2006

Clinical Neuroscience - 2006;59(11-12)

[Objective - To investigate the pathomechanism of essential (ET) and parkinsonian tremor (PT) by studying the correlation between tremor severity and movement-related beta rhythm changes of the human electroencephalogram. Patients and methods - We recorded the electroencephalogram of 10 patients with essential tremor, 10 with Parkinsonian tremor and 10 controls. In a preliminary session we determined the side with lower and higher tremor intensity (T+, T++ respectively), using accelerometry. Subjects pressed an on-off switch in a self-paced manner with left and right thumb. After digitalization of the EEG from Cz, C3, C4 electrodes, the movement reactive beta frequency (MRBF), its minimum/maximum peak power values and their latencies triggered to movement offset were determined. Results - The time course and amplitude of movement related beta desynchronization (ERD) were similar in each group regardless of tremor intensity. In ET tremor severity did not influence post-movement beta synchronization (PMBS) amplitude (PMBSET+=100.98±48.874%, PMBSET++=135.1±92.87%; p=0.231), however it was significantly delayed after the movement of the more tremulous hand (latPMBSET+=1.26±0.566 s, latPMBSET++= 1.57±0.565 s, p=0.003). In the PT group on the side of pronounced tremor the amplitude of PMBS decreased but it was not delayed, compared to the less affected hand (PMBSPT+=115.19±72.131%, PMBSPT++= 77.84±53.101%, p=0.0028; latPMBSPT+=1.4±0.74 s, latPMBSPT++=1.25±0.797 s, p=0.191). In controls the power and latency of PMBS was similar on both sides. Conclusions - The results suggest that neuronal mechanisms underlying PMBS generation are differently affected by ET and PT. Investigation of PMBS might be used for the differential diagnosis of essential tremor and Parkinson's disease.]

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