Clinical Neuroscience

[Genetics and present therapy options in Parkinson’s disease: a review]

BEREZNAI Benjámin1, MOLNÁR Mária Judit1

JUNE 02, 2009

Clinical Neuroscience - 2009;62(05-06)

[In the past years, six monogenic forms of Parkinson disease have clearly been associated with this movement disorder. The most frequent forms are LRRK2- and Parkin-associated Parkinson disease. Currently, a genetic diagnosis does not change the therapy, the genes involved in genetic Parkinson disease help to understand the underlying pathophysiologic mechanisms of Parkinson disease. Beside the overview of the molecular-genetic basis, we give a review about genetic testing, pharmacological and other multidisciplinary treatment options.]

AFFILIATIONS

  1. Semmelweis Egyetem, Molekuláris Neurológiai Klinikai és Kutatási Központ, Budapest

COMMENTS

0 comments

Further articles in this publication

Clinical Neuroscience

[The 25 years of the epileptological workshops in Gyõr (1984-2008)]

OSTORHARICS-HORVÁTH György

Clinical Neuroscience

[Severe intracranial hypotension in an adolescent with Marfan syndrome. Case report]

ROSDY Beáta, KOLLÁR Katalin, MÓSER Judit, VÁRALLYAY György, KORDÁS Mariann

[Spontaneous intracranial hypotension is a rare complication of connective tissue disorders. One of them is Marfan syndrome. It predisposes the patient to meningeal diverticula. Possibly after minor unrecognised head trauma or secondary to Valsalva manoeuvre cerebrospinal fluid leak from meningeal diverticula can happen. It causes postural headache. We describe a 15 year old adolescent female newly diagnosed with Marfan syndrome, who presented with intractable postural headache. Our patient's brain MRI showed bilateral frontal subdural effusion, narrow ventricles, downward displacement of the brainstem, enlarged cervical venous plexi, dural ectasias and wide nerve root sleeves. Radionuclide cisternography demonstrated CSF leaks at multiple sites. She could not be treated conservatively, but was successfully treated by epidural saline injections. Control brain and cervical MRI confirmed her healing, too. At the two and half year follow up visit, she was completely well. So we recommend this easiest technic to use before epidural autolog blood patches.]

Clinical Neuroscience

[Atlas of Microsurgery of the Lateral Skull Base]

VERES Róbert és munkatársa

Clinical Neuroscience

[Posterior ischaemic optic neuropathy]

BOÓR Krisztina, KOVÁCS Krisztina, RÓZSA Anikó, PÁNCZÉL Gyula, SZILVÁSSY Ildikó, GÁCS Gyula

[Here one case report of the posterior ischaemic optic neuropathy, a rare and underdiagnosed form of the non arteritic ischaemic optic neuropathy is presented, to underline the value of the MRI in the diagnosis. The ischaemic optic neuropathy is the infarction of the optic nerve. Depending on the affected segment of optic nerve (optic nerve head or retrobulbar segment) two subclasses exist: the anterior (AION) and the posterior (PION) ischaemic optic neuropathy. Ischaemic optic neuropathy characterized by sudden, painless, mononuclear loss of vision, and/or visual field defect, that is accompanied by a diagnostic picture of the optic disc fundus only in the case of the AION. The diagnosis of the PION is based on a diagnosis of exclusion described by Hayreh in 1981. The macular and retinal laesions, the etiological role of toxic agent, the compression and the inflammation of the optic nerve all have to be excluded. The differential diagnosis between the PION and the retrobulbar neuritis is more difficult. Nowadays, in addition to the case history and the clinical data the diagnosis of the PION could be confirmed with help of VEP (visual evoked potential) and MRI. In the case of an old woman who had a sudden, painless visual loss of left eye we confirmed the diagnosis of PION with MRI which was presumed after had excluding other etiological factors.]

Clinical Neuroscience

[PhD-thesis Stroke prevention: the role of carotis stenting and the practice of the antithrombotic treatment]

SZTRIHA László

All articles in the issue

Related contents

Clinical Neuroscience

[Earlier and more efficiently: the role of deep brain stimulation for parkinson’s disease preserving the working capabilities]

DELI Gabriella, BALÁS István, KOMOLY Sámuel, DÓCZI Tamás, JANSZKY József, ASCHERMANN Zsuzsanna, NAGY Ferenc, BOSNYÁK Edit, KOVÁCS Norbert

[Background – The recently published “EarlyStim” study demonstrated that deep brain stimulation (DBS) for the treatment of Parkinson’s disease (PD) with early fluctuations is superior to the optimal pharmacological treatment in improving the quality of life and motor symptoms, and preserving sociocultural position. Our retrospective investigation aimed to evaluate if DBS therapy was able to preserve the working capabilities of our patients. Methods – We reviewed the data of 39 young (<60 years-old) PD patients who underwent subthalamic DBS implantation at University of Pécs and had at least two years follow-up. Patients were categorized into two groups based on their working capabilities: Patients with active job (“Job+” group, n=15) and retired patients (without active job, “Job-” group, n=24). Severity of motor symptoms (UPDRS part 3), quality of life (EQ-5D) and presence of active job were evaluated one and two years after the operation. Results – As far as the severity of motor symptoms were concerned, similar (approximately 50%) improvement was achieved in both groups. However, the postoperative quality of life was significantly better in the Job+ group. Majority (12/15, 80%) of Job+ group members were able to preserve their job two years after the operation. However, only a minimal portion (1/24, 4.2%) of the Job- group members was able to return to the world of active employees (p<0.01, McNemar test). Conclusion – Although our retrospective study has several limitations, our results fit well with the conclusions of “EarlyStim” study. Both of them suggest that with optimal timing of DBS implantation we may preserve the working capabilities of our patients.]

Clinical Neuroscience

[Treatment of dystonia by deep brain stimulation: a summary of 40 cases]

DELI Gabriella, BALÁS István, KOMOLY Sámuel, DÓCZI Tamás, JANSZKY József, ILLÉS Zsolt, ASCHERMANN Zsuzsanna, TASNÁDI Emese, NAGY Ferenc, PFUND Zoltán, BÓNÉ Beáta, BOSNYÁK Edit, KULIFFAY Zsolt, SZIJJÁRTÓ Gábo

[Background - Bilateral pallidal deep brain stimulation (DBS) is an established treatment option for primary generalized and segmental dystonia. In the present study we evaluated the results of our dystonia patients treated by DBS. Methods - The surgical results of forty consecutive dystonia patients underwent DBS implantation were analyzed (age: 43.7±17.7 years; sex: 22 men; etiology: 24 primary and 16 secondary dystonia; topography: 24 generalized, 12 segmental and four hemidystonia; disease duration: 16.1±9.3 years). Severity of dystonia measured by Burke-Fahn-Marsden Dystonia Rating Scale (BFMDRS) and health-related quality of life measured by EQ-5D scale were obtained preoperatively and compared to the scores obtained at postoperative six months and subsequent yearly follow-ups. The average follow-up lasted 2.5 years (median, 0.5-8 years). In all cases the BFMDRS scores were re-evaluated by a rater blinded to the treatment. Treatment responsiveness was defined as an at least 25% improvement on the BFMDRS scores. Non-parametric Mann-Whitney, McNemar and Kruskal-Wallis tests were applied to test statistical significance. Results - Severity of dystonia improved from 31 to 10 points (median, 68% improvement, p<0.01) in the primary dystonia group, whereas in secondary dystonia these changes were statistically insignificant (improvement from 40 to 31.5 points, 21.2%, p>0.05). However, the health-related quality of life significantly improved in both groups (primary dystonia: 0.378 vs. 0.788 and secondary dystonia: 0.110 vs. 0.388, p<0.01). Significantly more patients in the primary dystonia group responded to DBS treatment than those in the secondary dystonia group (83.3% vs. 37.5%, p<0.01). Conclusion - Our results are in accordance with previously published international findings demonstrating that DBS is a highly effective and long-lasting treatment option for primary dystonia. DBS is considerably less efficient in secondary dystonia; however, it still has a high impact on the quality of life presumably due to its pain-relieving effect.]

Clinical Neuroscience

[Validation of the Hungarian Unified Dyskinesia Rating Scale]

HORVÁTH Krisztina, ASCHERMANN Zsuzsanna, ÁCS Péter, BOSNYÁK Edit, DELI Gabriella, PÁL Endre, KÉSMÁRKI Ildikó, HORVÁTH Réka, TAKÁCS Katalin, BALÁZS Éva, KOMOLY Sámuel, BOKOR Magdolna, RIGÓ Eszter, LAJTOS Júl

[Background - The Unified Dyskinesia Rating Scale (UDysRS) was published in 2008. It was designed to be simultaneous valid, reliable and sensitive to therapeutic changes. The Movement Disorder Society organizing team developed guidelines for the development of official non- English translations consisting of four steps: translation/back-translation, cognitive pretesting, large field testing, and clinimetric analysis. The aim of this paper was to introduce the new UDysRS and its validation process into Hungarian. Methods - After the translation of UDysRS into Hungarian and back-translated into English, it was reviewed by the UDysRS translation administration team. Subsequent cognitive pretesting was conducted with ten patients. For the large field testing phase, the Hungarian official working draft version of UDysRS was tested with 256 patients with Parkinson’s disease having dyskinesia. Confirmatory factor analyses (CFA) determined whether the factor structure for the valid Spanish UDysRS could be confirmed in data collected using the Hungarian Official Draft Version. To become an official translation, the Comparative Fit Index (CFI) had to be ≥0.90 compared to the Spanish-language version. Results - For the Hungarian UDysRS the CFI was 0.98. Conclusion - The overall factor structure of the Hungarian version was consistent with that of the Spanish version based on the high CFIs for the UDysRS in the CFA; therefore, this version was designated as the Official Hungarian Version Of The UDysRS.]

Clinical Neuroscience

[The absence of the common LRRK2 G2019S mutation in 120 young onset Hungarian Parkinon’s disease patients]

BALICZA Péter, BEREZNAI Benjámin, TAKÁTS Annamária, KLIVÉNYI Péter, DIBÓ György, HIDASI Eszter, BALOGH István, MOLNÁR Mária Judit

[Parkinson’s disease is a promising target of applying personalized medicine. For this purpose it is crucial to reveal the genetic and environmental factors, which contribute to the disease, also to collect epidemiologic data and to preserve the patients samples and data in a proper biobank. In our investigation we examined the prevalence of the most frequent Parkinson’s disease causing LRRK2 G2019S mutation in a Hungarian Parkinson-patient group. From 120 patients, we haven’t detected this substitution in anyone. Our investigation suggest that the mutation LRRK2 G2019S may be a rare cause of Parkinson disease in the Hungarian population.]

Ca&Bone

[The effects of thyroid hormones on bone]

BAJNOK Éva, LAKATOS Péter

[The effects of thyroid hormones on bone tissue are of fundamental importance.They are required for skeletal development and later for normal bone metabolism.Their action is dose-dependent and also depends on the degree of differentiation of the target tissue. In childhood, thyroid hypofunction manifests itself in growth retardation, whereas hyperfunction will accelerate bone maturation.The exact mechanism of action of thyroid hormones on bone in later years is poorly understood, and their clinical relevance on the risk of bone fracture, the most important complication, is also unclear. In adults with hypothyroidism, bone mineral density (BMD) remains unchanged or even becomes increased, but the risk of fractures is elevated. In hyperthyroidism the bone turnover is increased, which may lead to a decrease in BMD and a higher risk of fracture. However, the results are inconsistent for endogenous subclinical hyperthyroidism, where BMD may also decrease and fractures may occur more frequently.Treatment of hypothyroidism may temporarily result in increased fragility but this phenomenon seems to be only transient. During L-T4 replacement therapy the TSH level should be kept in the normal range, while with suppression, it should be set to the lower end of the normal range. During treatment of hyperthyroidism BMD temporarily increases and the risk of fractures decreases.The most effective way of preventing osteoporosis and bone fractures in all cases is the early recognition and treatment of thyroid diseases.The presence of other osteoporosis risk factors should always be considered. In some cases adjuvant therapy may be necessary to stop bone loss.]