Clinical Neuroscience

[Functional magnetic resonance imaging studies in pain research]

ÉDES Andrea Edit1,2, JUHÁSZ Gabriella1,2,3,4

SEPTEMBER 30, 2016

Clinical Neuroscience - 2016;69(09-10)

DOI: https://doi.org/10.18071/isz.69.0307

[Functional imaging studies opened a new way to understand the neural activity underlying pain perception and the pathomechanism of chronic pain syndromes. In the last twenty years several results of functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) studies have been published about examining the different aspects of complex pain experience. The aim of these studies is to understand the functioning of the pain control system, the so-called pain matrix, activated by acute nociceptive stimulus. Another important field of pain research is the investigation of neuronal processes underlying chronic pain, since the pathomechanism of this is still unclear. Our review aims to provide insight into the methods of pain research using fMRI and the achievements of the last few years.]

AFFILIATIONS

  1. MTA-SE-NAP B Genetikai Agyi Képalkotó Migrén Kutató Csoport, Magyar Tudományos Akadémia, Semmelweis Egyetem, Budapest, Magyarország
  2. MTA-SE Neuropszichofarmakológiai és Neurokémiai munkacsoport, Magyar Tudományos Akadémia, Semmelweis Egyetem, Budapest, Magyarország
  3. Neuroscience and Psychiatry Unit, The University of Manchester, Manchester, United Kingdom and Manchester Academic Health Sciences Centre, Manchester, United Kingdom
  4. Semmelweis Egyetem, Gyógyszerésztudományi Kar, Gyógyszerhatástani Intézet, Budapest, Magyarország

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