Clinical Neuroscience

[Dezsõ Miskolczy, the founder of modern neurology in Hungary]

PÁSZTOR Emil

OCTOBER 20, 2002

Clinical Neuroscience - 2002;55(09-10)

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Clinical Neuroscience

[Anxiety in epilepsy - based on two case reports]

BARAN Brigitta, FARKAS Márta, RAJNA Péter

[There are a great number of psychopathological symptoms which manifest themselves in 70-75% of epileptic patients but most of them remain unrecognised and untreated. These symptoms may affect the patients’ quality of life more negatively than the epileptic seizures themselves. Anxiety is one of the most frequently occurring interictal psychopathological symptom. A number of specialists agree that chronic epilepsy causes the amplification of endogenic seizure suppressing mechanisms which hinder the epileptic seizures and are responsible for the development of interictal psychopathological symptoms. However the physiological effects of the interictal psychopathological conditions (e.g. anxiety) have epileptogenic effect as well. There is a high chance that the conditions of epilepsy and anxiety will mutually create a destructive vicious circle and it will be illustrated by our two case reports. In our experience, before modifying the pharmacotherapy of a patient suffering from chronic epilepsy with increased frequency of seizures, the anxiety level should be defined; and if it is high it should be treated first. From our perspective, the so-called ”rational bitherapy” is very effective when a high potential antiepileptic drug is combined with an anxiety reducing method. The latter can be drug related or consists only of psychotherapy. We need more controlled clinical research to prove that inside epilepsy there are risk groups as well as conditions of high risk when the connection between anxiety and epilepsy is more than evident. The described cases seem to indicate that the existence of periictal anxiety can be a risk factor in developing later interictal anxiety.]

Clinical Neuroscience

[Informations for the candidates of the title of ”Doctor of the Hungarian Academy of Science”]

VÉCSEI László

Clinical Neuroscience

[The antinociceptive effect of kynurenic acid]

KÉKESI Gabriella, HORVÁTH Gyöngyi

[It is well known that glutamate receptors have significant role in the pain transmission. The activation of N-methyl-Daspartate receptors causes persistent pain, therefore the antagonists acting on these receptors cause antinociception in chronic pain states. As the synthetic N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor antagonists have several side effects, they are not used generally in the clinical therapy. The tryptophan metabolite kynurenic acid is an endogenous antagonist of N-methyl-D-aspartate receptors. Although some data proved its neuroprotective effect, only a few studies suggest the antinociceptive potential of kynurenic acid. The goal of this review to summarise the possible role of kynurenic acid in the pain therapy based on the results of animal studies. Data available concerning this subject demonstrated that kynurenic acid is not an appropriate agent for antinociception neither in single nor in continuous administration because of its side-effect resulting in motor deficiency. On the other hand the combination of low doses of kynurenic acid and endomorphin-1 provides effective antinociception without side-effects on inflammatory pain test, thus may offer a new treatment modality in human pain therapy.]

Clinical Neuroscience

[Kennedy’s syndrome - bulbo-spinal muscular atrophy]

SZABÓ Antal, MECHLER Ferenc

[Kennedy syndrome is a late-onset, bulbar-spinal type of muscular atrophy, with X-linked recessive inheritance. The characteristic features of the disease become prominent in the 4-5th decades: proximal muscle wasting and weakness, bulbar signs, fasciculations in skeletal muscles, subtle signs of endocrine dysfunction, such as gynaecomastia or testicular atrophy. The electrophysiological examinations are the keypoint to the diagnosis. Electroneurography shows normal conduction velocity in peripheral nerves, but the sensory nerves usually show axonal degeneration, which causes only very mild or subclinical neurological deficits. Electromyography shows chronic anterior horn cell degeneration in skeletal muscles. Molecular genetic diagnosis was introduced in 1991, when an abnormal expansion of CAG repeat was found in the first exon of the androgen receptor gene on chromosome X with a frequency of 100% in the affected population. Since the progression is very slow and these patients can expect a normal life span, it is essential to distinguish this syndrome from other, often more severe diseases, such as ALS. There is no proven therapy for Kennedy's disease yet. This is the first case of Kennedy's disease published in Hungary.]

Clinical Neuroscience

[The role of transcranial magnetic stimulation in clinical diagnosis: motor evoked potential (MEP)]

ARÁNYI Zsuzsanna, SIMÓ Magdolna

[Transcranial magnetic stimulation allows painless, non-invasive stimulation, neurophysiological evaluation of nervous structure covered by bone or difficult to access for other reasons. In the clinical setting the technique is mainly used for the investigation of the corticospinal tract (motor evoked potential: MEP). Based upon our experience with patients examined over the course of four years, we have attempted to highlight the clinical situations, where diagnostic help is provided by this technique. MEP in general has proved to be a sensitive and reliable examination. Its significance is apparent mainly in situations where clinical signs of corticospinal tract dysfunction are not evident, or they are masked by lower motoneurone involvement, and where neuroimaging techniques are not informative. The demonstration of subclinical corticospinal lesion is often essential to establish the diagnosis in multiple sclerosis and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis. The technique however received little attention so far with respect to its role in the diagnosis of various spinal cord disorders, and in the demonstration of intact corticospinal function in case of weakness, psychogenic in origin. We have endeavoured to provide further evidence in support of this, and thereby advocating a wider clinical application of the technique.]

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Clinical Neuroscience

[Advanced Parkinson’s disease characteristics in clinical practice: Results from the OBSERVE-PD study and sub-analysis of the Hungarian data]

TAKÁTS Annamária, ASCHERMANN Zsuzsanna, VÉCSEI László, KLIVÉNYI Péter, DÉZSI Lívia, ZÁDORI Dénes, VALIKOVICS Attila, VARANNAI Lajos, ONUK Koray, KINCZEL Beatrix, KOVÁCS Norbert

[The majority of patients with advanced Parkinson’s disease are treated at specialized movement disorder centers. Currently, there is no clear consensus on how to define the stages of Parkinson’s disease; the proportion of Parkinson’s patients with advanced Parkinson’s disease, the referral process, and the clinical features used to characterize advanced Parkinson’s disease are not well delineated. The primary objective of this observational study was to evaluate the proportion of Parkinson’s patients identified as advanced patients according to physician’s judgment in all participating movement disorder centers across the study. Here we evaluate the Hungarian subset of the participating patients. The study was conducted in a cross-sectional, non-interventional, multi-country, multi-center format in 18 countries. Data were collected during a single patient visit. Current Parkinson’s disease status was assessed with Unified Parkinson’s Disease Rating Scale (UPDRS) parts II, III, IV, and V (modified Hoehn and Yahr staging). Non-motor symptoms were assessed using the PD Non-motor Symptoms Scale (NMSS); quality of life was assessed with the PD 8-item Quality-of-Life Questionnaire (PDQ-8). Parkinson’s disease was classified as advanced versus non-advanced based on physician assessment and on questions developed by the Delphi method. Overall, 2627 patients with Parkinson’s disease from 126 sites were documented. In Hungary, 100 patients with Parkinson’s disease were documented in four movement disorder centers, and, according to the physician assessment, 50% of these patients had advanced Parkinson’s disease. Their mean scores showed significantly higher impairment in those with, versus without advanced Parkinson’s disease: UPDRS II (14.1 vs. 9.2), UPDRS IV Q32 (1.1 vs. 0.0) and Q39 (1.1 vs. 0.5), UPDRS V (2.8 vs. 2.0) and PDQ-8 (29.1 vs. 18.9). Physicians in Hungarian movement disorder centers assessed that half of the Parkinson’s patients had advanced disease, with worse motor and non-motor symptom severity and worse QoL than those without advanced Parkinson’s disease. Despite being classified as eligible for invasive/device-aided treatment, that treatment had not been initiated in 25% of these patients.]

Clinical Neuroscience

To handle the HaNDL syndrome through a case: The syndrome of headache with neurologic deficits and cerebrospinal fluid lymphocytosis

ÇOBAN Eda, TEKER Ruken Serap, SERİNDAĞ Helin, SAKALLI Nazan, SOYSAL Aysun

The syndrome of headache with neurologic deficits and cerebrospinal fluid lymphocytosis (HaNDL) is a rare entity. This disease has been related to migrainous headaches. It is a benign, self-limited disorder, which is characterized by fluctuating neurological symptoms and cerebrospinal fluid lymphocytosis. We describe a case of a 47 years old man with acute onset of headache and aphasia. Cerebrospinal fluid analysis revealed a lymphocytic pleocytosis (25 cells/μl, 100% lymphocytes). Electroencephalogram showed moderate slow rhythm in the left hemisphere, with temporoparietal predominance, and without epileptiform activity. His blood tests as well as magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) results were normal. With the diagnosis of HaNDL syndrome the patient was accepted in the Department of Neurology and discharged with full recovery.

Clinical Neuroscience

Evaluation of anxiety, depression and marital relationships in patients with migraine

DEMIR Fıgen Ulku, BOZKURT Oya

Aim - The aim of this study was to evaluate the frequency and characteristics of attacks in patients with migraine, to determine the effects of anxiety or depressive symptoms, and to evaluate the marital relationships of patients with migraine. Method - Thirty patients who were admitted to the neurology outpatient clinic of our hospital between July 2018 and October 2018 and were diagnosed with migraine according to the 2013 International Headache Society (IHS) diagnostic criteria were included in this cross-sectional study. Age, sex, headache frequency and severity, depressive traits, marital satisfaction and anxiety status were examined. We used the Beck Depression Inventory (BDI), State-Trait Anxiety Inventory (STAI), Maudsley Marital Questionnaire (MMQ) and Visual Analogue Scale (VAS) for measuring relevant parameters. Results - The mean severity of migraine pain according to VAS scale was 6.93 ± 1.41 and the mean number of migraine attacks was 4.50 ± 4.24. The mean BDI score of the patients was 12.66 ± 8.98, the mean MMQ-M score was 19.80 ± 12.52, the mean MMQ-S score was 13.20 ± 9.53, the mean STAI-state score was 39.93 ± 10.87 and the mean STAI-trait score was 45.73 ± 8.96. No significant correlation was found between age, number of migraine attacks, migraine duration, migraine headache intensity, and BDI, STAI and MMQ scores (p>0.05). But there was a positive correlation between MMQ-S and scores obtained from the BDI and STAI-state scales (p<0.05). Conclusion - In this study more than half of the migraine patients had mild, moderate or severe depression. A positive correlation was found between sexual dissatisfaction and scale scores of depression and anxiety.

Clinical Neuroscience

Relationship between Status Epilepticus Severity Score and etiology in adult NCSE patients

GENC Fatma, ERDAL Abidin, AKCA Gizem, KARACAY Ertan, GÖKSU Özaydın Eylem, KUTLU Gülnihal, GÖMCELI Bicer Yasemin

Purpose - Nonconvulsive status epilepticus (NCSE) is a heterogeneous, severe neurological disorder of different etiologies. In this study, the outcomes of NCSE episodes was assessed in a large series of adult patients. Our objective was to evaluate relationship between Status Epilepticus Severity Score (STESS) and etiology and the role of etiological factors on predicting the outcomes. Method - In this retrospective study, the medical records of 95 patients over 18 years of age who were diagnosed with NCSE between June 2011 and December 2015 were reviewed. Their treatment and follow-up for NCSE was performed at the Epilepsy Unit in Department of Neurology, Antalya Research and Training Hospital. Etiological factors thought to be responsible for NCSE episodes as well as the prognostic data were retrieved. The etiological factors were classified into three groups as those with a known history of epilepsy (Group 1), primary neurological disorder (Group 2), or systemic/unknown etiology (Group 3). STESS was retrospectively applied to patients. Results - There were 95 participants, 59 of whom were female. Group 1, Group 2, and Group 3 consisted of 11 (7 female), 54 (33 female), and 30 (19 female) patients, respectively. Of the 18 total deaths, 12 occurred in Group 2, and 6 in Group 3. The negative predictive value for a STESS score of ≤ 2 was 93.88% (+LR 2.05 95% CI: 1.44-2.9 and -LR 0.3 95% CI 0.10-0.84 ) in the overall study group. While the corresponding values for Group 1 (patients with epilepsy), Group 2 (patients with primary neurological disorder), and group 3 (patients with systemic or unknown etiology) were 100%, 92.59% (+LR 2.06 95%CI: 1.32-3.21 and -LR 0.28 95% CI 0.08-1.02 ) 83.33% (+LR 1.14 95%CI: 0.59-2.9 and -LR 0.80 95% CI 0.23-2.73). Conclusions - This study included the one of the largest patients series ever reported in whom STESS, a clinical scoring system proposed for use in patients with status epilepticus, has been implemented. Although STESS appeared to be quite useful for predicting a favorable outcome in NCSE patients with epilepsy and primary neurological disorders, its predictive value in patients with systemic or unknown etiology was lower. Further prospective studies including larger NCSE samples are warranted.

Hungarian Radiology

[The quality control of radiological equipments in Hungary]

PELLET Sándor, PORUBSZKY Tamás, BALLAY László, GICZI Ferenc, MOTOC Anna Mária, VÁRADI Csaba, TURÁK Olivér, GÁSPÁRDY Géza