Clinical Neuroscience

[Criticism to neurological services and suggestions for improving it based on the article of Dániel Bereczki and András Ajtay]

HALÁSZ Péter

JULY 20, 2011

Clinical Neuroscience - 2011;64(07-08)

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Clinical Neuroscience

[The brain that changes itself - Norman Doidge]

HALÁSZ Péter

Clinical Neuroscience

[Extension of polynomial analysis of interstitial I-125 brachytherapy for 48 months]

KOLUMBÁN Zsuzsa, MAJOR Tibor, JULOW Jenő

[Objective - Previously we described from 20 patients’ data with our new “polynomial prediction approach” the volumetrical changes following gliomas I-125 brachytherapy. The aim of this study is to extend the polynomials for 48 months, and to carry out multivarial analysis of several different aspects. Methods - 20 inoperable low-grade gliomas were followed for a 48-month period after I-125 interstitial irradiation. The delivered dose on the tumor surface was 50-60 Gy. Dose planning and image fusion were done with the BrainLab Target 1.19 software, mathematical and statistical computations were carried out with the Matlab numeric computation and visualization software. Volumes of tumor necrosis, reactive zone and edema referred to as “triple ring” were measured on image fused control MRI and planning CT images. The measured volumes were normalized with respect to the reference volumes. Mean values of volumes were determined, then polynomials were fitted to the mean using the polynomial curve fitting method. The accuracy of our results was verified by correlating the predicted data with the measured ones. Results - We have found that the edema reaches its maximum two times after irradiation during the 48 months follow up period. We have shown that small tumors react more rapidly and creating greater volumes of the “triple ring” than bigger ones. Conclusions - The polynomial prediction approach proposed here reveals the dynamics of triple ring for 48 months. The derived polynomials and the multivarial analysis carried out afterwords help to (i) design the best treatment, (ii) follow up the patient's condition and (iii) plan reirradiation if necessary.]

Clinical Neuroscience

[Combined evoked potentials in co-occuring attention deficit hyperactivity disorder and epilepsy]

MAJOR Zoltán Zsigmond

[Background and purpose - Evoked potentials, both stimulus related and event related, show disturbances in attention deficit-hyperactivity disorder and epilepsies, too. This study was designed to evaluate if these potentials are characteristically influenced by the presence of the two diseases, individually, and in the case of co-occurrence. Methods - Fourty children were included, and four groups were formed, control group, ADHD group, epilepsy group and a group with the comorbidity of epilepsy and ADHD. Epilepsy patients were under proper antiepileptic treatment; ADHD patients were free of specific therapy. Brainstem auditory evoked potentials, visual evoked potentials and auditory P300 evaluation were performed. Results - The latency of the P100 and N135 visual evoked potential components was significantly extended by the presence of epilepsy. If ADHD was concomitantly present, this effect was attenuated. Brainstem auditory evoked potential components were prolonged in the presence of the comorbidity, considering the waves elicited in the brainstem. P300 latencies were prolonged by the presence of co-occurring ADHD and epilepsy. Feedback parameters showed overall reduction of the tested cognitive performances in the ADHD group. Conclusion - Disturbances produced by the presence of ADHD-epilepsy comorbidity reveal hypothetically a linked physiopathological path for both diseases, and offers an approach with possible diagnostic importance, combined evoked potential recordings.]

Clinical Neuroscience

[Pseudo abducens palsy]

RÓZSA Anikó, KOVÁCS Krisztina, SZILVÁSSY Ildikó, BOÓR Krisztina, GÁCS Gyula

[In this study, we present two cases of different eye movement disorders with variable case histories but with the same end stage; abduction paresis of one of the eyes, which ceased when the other eye was covered. Our differential diagnosis is that either the ocular form of myasthenia gravis, convergence spasm or ocular myotonia could explain the symptoms. However, we hypothesize that the clinical picture corresponds to pseudo abducens palsy or focal dystonia of the extraocular muscle, which in turn could be the result of impaired inhibition of the tonic resting activity of the antagonistic medial rectus muscle. We offer an explanation for the patomechanism of pseudoabducens palsy and the variants of internuclear ophthalmoplegia.]

Clinical Neuroscience

[Recent changes in the paradigm of limbic encephalitis]

ILLÉS Zsolt

[In the recent years, novel antibodies associated with limbic encephalitis have been described, which target such extracellular receptors or proteins that have been already indicated in the pathogenesis of hereditary or degenerative diseases. In a number of cases, where pathogenic role of antibodies generated against the voltage-gated potassium channel (VGKC) had been presumed, antibodies against a trans-synaptic scaffolding protein, LGI1 were indicated. Antibody response against NMDA-receptors has been suggested as a major cause of limbic encephalitis especially in young females, resulting in a typical clinical syndrome sometimes triggered by an ovarian teratoma. Antibodies against other receptors essential in synaptic transmission and plasticity (AMPA and GABAB receptors) have been also indicated, partially elicited by paraneoplastic processes. Such antibodies against surface proteins result in severe but potentially treatable diseases due to reversible internalization of the antigens crosslinked by the bivalent antibodies. In contrast, the rare classical onconeural antibodies reacting with intracellular targets (anti-Hu, anti-Ta/Ma2, anti- CV2/CRMP5) may elicit additional symptoms beside limbic encephalitis and the prognosis of such syndromes is poor.]

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Clinical Neuroscience

Alexithymia is associated with cognitive impairment in patients with Parkinson’s disease

SENGUL Yildizhan, KOCAK Müge, CORAKCI Zeynep, SENGUL Serdar Hakan, USTUN Ismet

Cognitive dysfunction (CD) is a common non-motor symptom of Parkinson’s disease (PD). Alexithy­mia is a still poorly understood neuropsychiatric feature of PD. Cognitive impairment (especially visuospatial dysfunction and executive dysfunction) and alexithymia share com­mon pathology of neuroanatomical structures. We hypo­thesized that there must be a correlation between CD and alexithymia levels considering this relationship of neuroanatomy. Objective – The aim of this study was to evaluate the association between alexithymia and neurocognitive function in patients with PD. Thirty-five patients with PD were included in this study. The Toronto Alexithymia Scale–20 (TAS-20), Geriatric Depression Inventory (GDI) and a detailed neuropsychological evaluation were performed. Higher TAS-20 scores were negatively correlated with Wechsler Adult Intelligence Scale (WAIS) similarities test score (r =-0.71, p value 0.02), clock drawing test (CDT) scores (r=-0.72, p=0.02) and verbal fluency (VF) (r=-0.77, p<0.01). Difficulty identifying feelings subscale score was negatively correlated with CDT scores (r=-0.74, p=0.02), VF scores (r=-0.66, p=0.04), visual memory immediate recall (r=-0.74, p=0.01). VF scores were also correlated with difficulty describing feelings (DDF) scores (r=-0.66, p=0.04). There was a reverse relationship bet­ween WAIS similarities and DDF scores (r=-0.70, p=0.02), and externally oriented-thinking (r=-0.77,p<0.01). Executive function Z score was correlated with the mean TAS-20 score (r=-62, p=0.03) and DDF subscale score (r=-0.70, p=0.01) Alexithymia was found to be associated with poorer performance on visuospatial and executive function test results. We also found that alexithymia was significantly correlated with depressive symptoms. Presence of alexithymia should therefore warn the clinicians for co-existing CD.

Lege Artis Medicinae

[Comment to the article titled “Exploratory study of outcomes of blood sample mass examinations by rank correlations”]

Clinical Neuroscience

Late simultaneous carcinomatous meningitis, temporal bone infiltrating macro-metastasis and disseminated multi-organ micro-metastases presenting with mono-symptomatic vertigo – a clinico-pathological case reporT

JARABIN András János, KLIVÉNYI Péter, TISZLAVICZ László, MOLNÁR Anna Fiona, GION Katalin, FÖLDESI Imre, KISS Geza Jozsef, ROVÓ László, BELLA Zsolt

Although vertigo is one of the most common complaints, intracranial malignant tumors rarely cause sudden asymmetry between the tone of the vestibular peripheries masquerading as a peripheral-like disorder. Here we report a case of simultaneous temporal bone infiltrating macro-metastasis and disseminated multi-organ micro-metastases presenting as acute unilateral vestibular syndrome, due to the reawakening of a primary gastric signet ring cell carcinoma. Purpose – Our objective was to identify those pathophysiological steps that may explain the complex process of tumor reawakening, dissemination. The possible causes of vestibular asymmetry were also traced. A 56-year-old male patient’s interdisciplinary medical data had been retrospectively analyzed. Original clinical and pathological results have been collected and thoroughly reevaluated, then new histological staining and immunohistochemistry methods have been added to the diagnostic pool. During the autopsy the cerebrum and cerebellum was edematous. The apex of the left petrous bone was infiltrated and destructed by a tumor mass of 2x2 cm in size. Histological reexamination of the original gastric resection specimen slides revealed focal submucosal tumorous infiltration with a vascular invasion. By immunohistochemistry mainly single infiltrating tumor cells were observed with Cytokeratin 7 and Vimentin positivity and partial loss of E-cadherin staining. The subsequent histological examination of necropsy tissue specimens confirmed the disseminated, multi-organ microscopic tumorous invasion. Discussion – It has been recently reported that the expression of Vimentin and the loss of E-cadherin is significantly associated with advanced stage, lymph node metastasis, vascular and neural invasion and undifferentiated type with p<0.05 significance. As our patient was middle aged and had no immune-deficiency, the promoting factor of the reawakening of the primary GC malignant disease after a 9-year-long period of dormancy remained undiscovered. The organ-specific tropism explained by the “seed and soil” theory was unexpected, due to rare occurrence of gastric cancer to metastasize in the meninges given that only a minority of these cells would be capable of crossing the blood brain barrier. Patients with past malignancies and new onset of neurological symptoms should alert the physician to central nervous system involvement, and the appropriate, targeted diagnostic and therapeutic work-up should be established immediately. Targeted staining with specific antibodies is recommended. Recent studies on cell lines indicate that metformin strongly inhibits epithelial-mesenchymal transition of gastric cancer cells. Therefore, further studies need to be performed on cases positive for epithelial-mesenchymal transition.

Hypertension and nephrology

[About the care of patients with hyperuricaemia and gout]

[This consensus document is intended to provide guidance for the effective and efficient treatment of asymptomatic individuals with high uric acid levels and gout patients.]

Clinical Neuroscience

[What happens to vertiginous population after emission from the Emergency Department?]

MAIHOUB Stefani, MOLNÁR András, CSIKÓS András, KANIZSAI Péter, TAMÁS László, SZIRMAI Ágnes

[Background – Dizziness is one of the most frequent complaints when a patient is searching for medical care and resolution. This can be a problematic presentation in the emergency department, both from a diagnostic and a management standpoint. Purpose – The aim of our study is to clarify what happens to patients after leaving the emergency department. Methods – 879 patients were examined at the Semmel­weis University Emergency Department with vertigo and dizziness. We sent a questionnaire to these patients and we had 308 completed papers back (110 male, 198 female patients, mean age 61.8 ± 12.31 SD), which we further analyzed. Results – Based on the emergency department diagnosis we had the following results: central vestibular lesion (n = 71), dizziness or giddiness (n = 64) and BPPV (n = 51) were among the most frequent diagnosis. Clarification of the final post-examination diagnosis took several days (28.8%), and weeks (24.2%). It was also noticed that 24.02% of this population never received a proper diagnosis. Among the population only 80 patients (25.8%) got proper diagnosis of their complaints, which was supported by qualitative statistical analysis (Cohen Kappa test) result (κ = 0.560). Discussion – The correlation between our emergency department diagnosis and final diagnosis given to patients is low, a phenomenon that is also observable in other countries. Therefore, patient follow-up is an important issue, including the importance of neurotology and possibly neurological examination. Conclusion – Emergency diagnosis of vertigo is a great challenge, but despite of difficulties the targeted and quick case history and exact examination can evaluate the central or peripheral cause of the balance disorder. Therefore, to prevent declination of the quality of life the importance of further investigation is high.]