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Lege Artis Medicinae

FEBRUARY 01, 2000

[Practical questions of perinatal thyroidology]

ILYÉS István

[Characteristic features of maternal, fetal and neonatal thyroid functions are discussed. The role of maternal thyroid hormone transfer in fetal development is emphasised with the interpretation of the association between maternal and fetal thyroid functions. Thyroid disorders and dysfunctions during neonatal period are summarised and the influence of maternal thyroid disease to neonatal thyroid function is demonstrated. The role of iodine deficiency and importance of optimal iodine intake during pregnancy are also emphasised. Congenital hypothyroidism and thyroid dysfunctions of premature infants are shortly presented. The importance of prenatal care, screening for congenital hypothyroidism and thyroid function checks in premature infants are also pointed out. ]

Lege Artis Medicinae

JULY 01, 2020

[Persisting Hashimoto’s thyroiditis converting to Graves’ disease]

TÓTH Géza

[Graves’disease and Hashimoto’s thyroiditis are the two most important types of autoimmune thyroid dis­eases. Autoimmune hyperthyroidism commonly leads later on to hypothyroidism. The conversion from persisting Hashimoto-thyroiditis to hyperthyroidism is rare in the literature. The author presents the cases of two patients, whose Hashimoto’s thyroiditis treated with thyroxin for years, changed into Graves’ hyperthyroidism sponta­neously. CASE REPORT – The patients had been diagnosed with autoimmune hypothyroidism since several years. The clinical symp­­toms, the low peripheral hormone le­vels, the high level of antithyroid antibo­dies and the ultrasound imaging confirmed the hypertrophic form of Hashimoto’s thy­roiditis. After several years of high dose le­vothyroxin treatment, clinical symptoms of hyperthyroidism have appeared. After omit­ting the substitution, the thyroid hormone levelled off at high values and the level of anti-TSH receptor antibodies raised too. The diffuse, obviously increased blood flow of the thyroid glands, and in one of the patients the thyroid scan, confirmed the Graves’ disease. During the thyreostatic treatment, the symptoms of the patients disappeared, they became euthyreoid and the antibody levels decreased as well. The Graves’ disease and the Hashimoto’s thyroiditis have many common features. These immunological, ge­netic and other common features enable the mutual transition of these two diseases.]

Clinical Oncology

APRIL 30, 2020

[Hormone replacement therapy in cancer survivors – Review of the literature]

DELI Tamás, OROSZ Mónika, JAKAB Attila

[Rapid advance in oncology leads to increasing survival of oncologic patients. More and more of them live long enough to reach either the natural age of menopause or, as a side effect of their oncotherapy, experience the cessation of gonadal function, leading to premature ovarian insuffi ciency, with disturbing vasomotor symtoms and long-term negative cardiovascular and skeletal effects. Thus, an ever increasing number of cancer survivors search endocrinologic help in the form of hormone replacement therapy (HRT). The misinterpretation of the WHI (Women’s Health Initiative) Study has lead to an irrational fear of female hormone replacement, both by the general population and medical professionals. It has seemed the logical and safe conclusion to many physicians to avoid HRT, supposing that this attitude defi nitely causes no harm, whereas the decision of prescribing estrogen alone or with progestins might bear oncologic and thromboembolic risks and may even lead to litigation in case of a potentially related complication. However, it was known even before the WHI results that premature menopause and hypogonadism decreases the life expectancy of women by years through its skeletal and cardiovascular effects, and this negative effect correlates with the length of the hypoestrogenaemic period. Yet, the oncologic risk of HRT is extremely diffi cult to assess. In this work we review the latest evidence from in vitro experiments to clinical studies. We group tumours regarding the oncologic risk of properly chosen female hormone replacement therapy in cancer survivors as follows: ’HRT is advanageous’ (e.g. endometrial cancer type I, cervical adenocarcinoma, haematologic malignancies, local cutaneous malignant melanoma, colorectal cancer, hepatocellular cancer); ’HRT is neutral’ (e.g. BRCA 1/2 mutation carriers without cancer, endometrial cancer type II, uterinal carcinosarcoma and adenosarcoma, certain types of ovarian cancer, cervical, vaginal and vulvar squamous cell carcinoma, prolactinoma, kidney cancer, pancreatic cancer, thyroid cancer); ’HRT is relatively contraindicated’ for various reasons (e.g. leiomyosarcoma, certain types of ovarian tumours, brain tumours, advanced metastatic malignant melanoma, lung cancer, gastric cancer, bladder cancer); ’HRT is diasadvantageous and thus contraindicated’ (e.g. breast cancer, endometrial stroma sarcoma, meningioma, glioma, hormone receptor positive gastric and bladder cancer).]

Lege Artis Medicinae

SEPTEMBER 30, 2020

[Thyroid disease – essentials for the everyday practice]

BAKOS Bence, TAKÁCS István

[Thyroid disorders are very frequent not only among endocrine diseases but also the general conditions. Every clinician, regardless of their specialty, meet patients with thyroid disorders during their everyday practice. While diagnostic and therapeutic options remained almost unchanged in the past decade, there are several inten­sively researched topics in the patient’s care, advances of which we ought to familiarize ourselves with. In this present paper we sought out to cover three of these fiercly discussed topics. ]

Clinical Neuroscience

MARCH 30, 2021

Cause of recurrent rhabdomyolysis, carnitine palmitoyltransferase II deficiency and novel pathogenic mutation

ÇAKAR Emel Nafiye, GÖR Zeynep, YEŞIL Gözde

Carnitine palmitoyltransferase II (CPT II) deficiency is an autosomal inherited metabolic disorder in which the β-oxidation of the long chain fatty acids is defective. The clinical presentation may be in various forms; it presents itself in the severe form during neonatal and infantile periods and as the less severe myopathic form in the school age and adolescence. While the severity of the rhabdomyolysis attacks varies, occasionally the clinical course may be complicated with acute renal failure. Acylcarnitine analysis may help in the diagnosis of CPT II, but its normality does not indicate the absence of the disease. If there is strong suspicion, genetic analysis should be performed on the cases. In this article, we present a 15-year-old male patient who had two rhabdomyolysis attacks triggered by infection and starvation. Acylcarnitine analysis of the case was normal, CPT II deficiency was considered when the history was evaluated, and CPT II gene c.137A>G (p.Gln46Arg) homozygous novel pathogenic mutation was detected. CPT II deficiency is one of the most common causes of metabolic rhabdomyolysis in patients with recurrent episodes of rhabdomyolysis.

Lege Artis Medicinae

MAY 20, 2019

[Perinatal faulty hormonal imprinting: early impact, late consequences]

CSABA György

[The description and basic study of hormonal imprinting were the first in the series of research, which led to the recognition of the role of perinatal chemical effects in the late (adult age) manifestation of some diseases and inclination to diseases. Today it is clear, that certain pathological states, as obesity or diabetes, hypo- or hyperactivity (autoimmunity and allergy) of immune system can be deduced to perinatal (hormonal or metabolic) imprinting. The perinatal hormonal (chemical) imprinting takes place at the first encounter between the developing hormone receptor and the target hormone which sets the binding capacity of the receptor for life. In the critical periods of ontogeny (in addition to the perinatal imprinting) it can be developed at weaning, in adolescence and in continuously dividing and differentiating cells during the whole life. It is provoked by considerable quantitative differences of the physiological hormone or the presence of strange target-hormone-like molecules. The faulty hormonal imprinting leads to the adult-age diseases at any time of life and is inherited epigenetically to the progeny generations. Faulty hormonal imprinting always could be present in earlier times however, at present, because of the erroneous multiplication of endocrine disruptors in the environment, nutrition and medicine, its importance is continuously growing. The effects of faulty hormonal imprinting seem to be dangerous however, it can be imagined in the far future also a positive effect by the transformation of the human endocrine system at an evolutionary route. In the metabolic or immunological imprinting as well, as in the DOHaD (Developmental Origins of Health and Disease) the foremost recognized hormonal (chemical) imprinting is materialized.]

Clinical Neuroscience

NOVEMBER 30, 2018

Inflammatory biomarkers in benign paroxysmal positional vertigo: A Turkey case-control study

AYSEL Tekeşin, ABDULKADIR Tunç

Objective - Benign paroxysmal positional vertigo (BPPV) is the most common cause of recurrent vertigo. Inflammation is a hypothetic etiological factor in BPPV. The aim of this study was to evaluate inflammatory biomarker levels in BPPV patients and compare these with the healthy subjects. Materials and methods - This prospective case-control study was conducted with 114 newly diagnosed BPPV patients and age- and sex- matched 83 healthy subjects. The laboratory investigations included serum hemogram, full biochemistry profiles, vitamin levels, thyroid hormone profiles, high sensitivity C-reactive protein (hsCRP) and erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR). Neutrophil-to-lymphocyte ratio (NLR), platelet-to-lymphocyte ratio (PLR), and monocyte to HDL-cholesterol ratio (MHR) values were calculated and compared between the patients and healthy subjects. Results - The mean age was 39.1 ± 12.4 years for patients, and 37.0 ± 11.9 for controls. Vitamin B12, hematocrit (Hct), creatinine, urea, and fT4 values, lymphocyte, total bilirubin, direct bilirubin and indirect bilirubin levels were significantly lower in BPPV patients (p ˂ 0.05), while HDL, SGOT, and ESR values were significantly higher. In the BPPV patients the mean NLR, PLR, and mean platelet volume (MPV) values were significantly higher than in the control subjects. Neutrophil, platelet, monocyte, MHR, and CRP values were similar in both groups (p ˃ 0.05). Conclusion - Our result suggests that NLR, PLR, MPV, ESR, and bilirubin levels should be taken into account as potential biomarkers of BPPV. As they are inexpensive parameters and widely available, they can be used in clinical practice for prediction of BPPV. However, further large-scale studies are required to confirm this relationship.

Clinical Neuroscience

JULY 20, 1996

[Changes in prolactin and cortisol levels after partial epileptic seizures]

KALÓCZKAI Andrea, HALÁSZ Péter

[Within the framework of presurgical evaluation 14 therapy resistant partial epileptic patients were studied. The prolactin and cortisol serum levels were measured in 15 partial seizures 15, 30 and 60 minutes after the beginning of seizures. Based on the localization of the siezure start on the EEG, ictal, interictal SPECT, MRI and neuropsychological findings the patients were devided into two groups: temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE) and extratemporal epilepsy (ETE). The hormone level measurement was carried out during video-EEG monitoring. In the 11 TLE patients prolactin level increase was found in all cases after the seizures either in the 15th or in the 30th minute samples. In the 4 ETE patients similar increase was found only in 1 patient. Cortisol level increase was found in 10 of the 11 TLE patients and in 2 of the 4 ETE patients. Our findings support the view according which prolactin and cortisol increases occur after seizures involving the temporo-limbic structures. Hormone level peaks are not obligatory consequences of partial epileptic seizures therefore there is no real point in differentiating between epileptic and pseudoepileptic seizures. ]

Lege Artis Medicinae

FEBRUARY 01, 2000

[A case of juvenile haemochromatosis presenting adrenocortical insufficinecy ]

VÁRKONYI Andrea, KOLLAI Géza, ROMCSIK László, MÜZES Györgyi, TULASSAY Zsolt, TORDAI Attila, ANDRIKOVICS Hajnalka, PETER Kaltwasser Joachim, SEIDL Christian

[Juvenile haemochromatosis is a rare autosomally inherited disorder of iron metabolism causing severe iron overload in young adults. The organs mostly affected are liver, spleen, pancreas, heart and the skin similarly to the genetically also determined adult form. CASE REPORT - Contrary to most juvenile haemochromatosis cases characterised by secondary hypogonadotropic hypogonadism, this patient presented with adrenocortical insufficiency. Involvement of the heart was present on diagnosis while liver showed normal architecture without increased iron content. Genetic analysis revealed that the patient did not carry the C282Y mutation, while the H63D mutation was present in heterozygous form. With hormone supply and regular vena sections the patient is free of complaints. CONCLUSION – This case demonstrates that severe iron overload can occur early in adult life without the presence of HFE gene mutations suggesting a putative gene defect responsible for juvenile haemochromatosis. ]