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Clinical Neuroscience

JANUARY 30, 2020

Review of electrode placement with the Slim Modiolar Electrode: identification and management

DIMAK Balazs, NAGY Roland, PERENYI Adam, JARABIN Andras Janos, SCHULCZ Rebeka, CSANÁDY Miklós, JÓRI József, ROVÓ László, KISS Geza Jozsef

Background - Several cochlear implant recipients experience functionality loss due to electrode array mal-positioning. The application of delicate perimodiolar electrodes has many electrophysiological advantages, however, these profiles may be more susceptible to tip fold-over. Purpose - The prompt realization of such complication following electrode insertion would be auspicious, thus the electrode could be possibly repositioned during the same surgical procedure. Methods - The authors present three tip fold-over cases, experienced throughout their work with Slim Modiolar Electrode implants. Implantations were performed through the round window approach, by a skilled surgeon. Standard intraoperative measurements (electric integrity, neural response telemetry, and electrical stapedial reflex threshold tests) were successfully completed. The electrode position was controlled by conventional radiography on the first postoperative day. Results - Tip fold-over was not tactilely sensated by the surgeon. Our subjects revealed normal intraoperative telemetry measurements, only the postoperative imaging showed the tip fold-over. Due to the emerging adverse perception of constant beeping noise, the device was replaced by a CI512 implant after 6 months in one case. In the two remaining cases, the electrode array was reloaded into a back-up sheath, and reinserted into the scala tympani successfully through an extended round window approach. Discussion - Future additional studies using the spread of excitation or electric field imaging may improve test reliability. As all of these measurements are still carried out following electrode insertion, real-time identification, unfortunately, remains questionable. Conclusion - Tip fold-over could be reliably identified by conventional X-ray imaging. By contrast, intraoperative electrophysiology was not sufficiently sensitive to reveal it.

Lege Artis Medicinae

MAY 20, 2017

[The impact of telemedicine on the development of doctor-patient relationship based on interviews conducted among physicians]

BÁN Attila

[Introduction - The doctor-patient relationship has always been an essential part of health care, however, in parallel with the integration infocommunication technologies in health care the doctor-patient communication is also transforming. Therefore, the aim of the study is to examine the effect of telemedicine on this relationship. Methods - During the study, we applied qualitative research methods and a total number of 58 semi-structured interviews (45 men, 13 women) were conducted among physicians having experience in telemedicine. The majority of the interviewees were radiologist, general practitioners, and internists. The interview questions concerned that what characterises the doctor-patient relationship in telemedicine. Results - The interviews pointed out that in teleradiology the doctor-patient relationship depersonalises and almost terminates. In this respect, the problem is often the incomplete clinical information about the patient. In turn, telemonitoring can bring a quality change in the doctor-patient communication and through remote contact the patients’ satisfaction, the sense of security, and the doctor-patient relationship will be further enhanced. Conclusions - In accordance with the academic literature - based on the research results - there is no clear evidence that telemedicine would affect doctor-patient communication only positively or only negatively. In some areas of telemedicine, this relationship is reducing (e.g. teleradiology) while in other areas it could be fur-ther strengthened (e.g. telemonitoring).]