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Clinical Oncology

APRIL 10, 2019

[Metals and cancer]

VETLÉNYI Enikő, RÁCZ Gergely

[We often tend to forget about our environment when looking for the origin of a disease. Inhaled air, drinking water and food, substances in contact with the skin all have an effect on the human body. Metals are indispensable parts of our everyday lives, their mining, processing and use cause a continuous exposure to them. Metal exert their effects on the body in various ways. Many of them are essential for maintaining homeostasis, but excessive or harmful metal intake can lead to health damage, including tumour formation through multiple attack points. Metals substitute each other during different transport processes and in the structure of proteins, they cause oxidative stress and bind to DNA, thereby damaging it. Applying them appropriately, the proapoptotic effect of the metal compounds is brought to the fore, thus becoming a therapeutic tool for tumours. Nowadays, platinum(II) compounds are widely used as chemotherapeutic agents and there are many ongoing studies to fi nd metal compounds with an ideal therapeutic and side-effect profi le. The aims of this article were to draw the attention to the dangers of metals in relation to cancer and to highlight their diverse application possibilities in current and future cancer therapy and diagnostics.]

Hypertension and nephrology

NOVEMBER 04, 2020

[The role of stress management in the care of hypertension and the treatment of cardiovascular disease]

SOMOGYI Éva, KISS Zoltán, STAUDER Adrienne

[The aim of this paper is to give an overview of the relationship between stress and hypertension and cardiovascular diseases, furthermore to introduce an evidence based stress management intervention available in Hungary. The correlation between cardiovascular disease and psychosocial factors (including concomitant mental disorders as well as personality traits or the effect of social environment) has been established in numerous studies aimed at investigating pathogenesis or various clinical endpoints. The 2016 Guidelines of the European Society of Cardiology include the assessment and the management of psychosocial problems with behavioral medicine interventions as a I.A level recommendation. The implementation of these guidelines in everyday clinical practice is crucial to decrease cardiovascular risk. This involves the training of health care professionals, the facilitation of multidisciplinary collaboration and the integration of behavioral intervention into everyday care. The Williams Life Skills (WLS) program is an evidence based behavioral medicine intervention aiming to improve stress management and communication skills which implemented internationally and also available all over Hungary. It involves the learning of simple coping strategies that facilitate the successful management of every day psychosocial stress situations and the self-conscious reduction of bodily and psychological tensions. In cardiovascular disease, this improves quality of life and survival. The WLS program is especially recommended for healthcare workers to decrease the negative health consequences of their high stress load and to prevent burnout. Stress may affect both doctors and patients during their interactions. Bálint groups have a positive impact on the physician-patient collaboration and help to reduce burnout by improving the understanding of the diseases from a more complex approach.]

Lege Artis Medicinae

DECEMBER 10, 2019

[Why did I survived? Treatment of acute stress reaction after a road accident]

SZABÓ József, SIPOS Mária

[INTRODUCTION - Survivors and witnesses of traffic accidents often experience an acute stress reaction. Immediate or at least fast psychological support, relieving the subjective suffering is very important in the respect of preventing psychological crisis, post-traumatic stress disorder or depression and the associated increasing risk of suicide. CASE REPORT - We present the case of a 27-year-old male patient who was the victim of a traffic accident and was partly responsible for it. He lost his mother in the accident, his sister was injured, and there was a casualty in the other affected car. He applied for a psychiatric appointment one week after the accident. He complained of insomnia, loss of appetite, sadness, weakness, anxiety. The treatment consisted of low-dose anxiolytic therapy, recommended in case of need, and a psychological support via acute stress protocol (G-tep) of EMDR therapy. Both short-term feedback from his family doctor and psychiatry outpatient follow-up after three weeks showed significant symptomatic improvement. CONCLUSIONS - In the last one and a half year, he has not applied for psychiatrical treatment. According his general practitioner there were no new psychological problems during this time. Our work has been successful in terms of immediate relief of suffering and prevention of psychological crisis and PTSD.]

Clinical Neuroscience

NOVEMBER 30, 2019

The effect of psychiatric comorbidities and stress-coping strategies on perceived quality of life in migraine

PETROVICS-BALOG Anna, MAJLÁTH Zsófia, LUKÁCS Melinda, HOLCZER Adrienn, MUST Anita, TAJTI János, VÉCSEI László

Purpose – Migraine is one of the most disabling primary headache conditions. We aimed to detect hidden symptoms of anxiety and depression and to survey stress-coping mechanisms and related quality of life in a large migraine population without any known psychiatric comorbidity. Method – 123 migraine patients (MG) and 66 healthy subjects (HC) completed the Beck Depression Inventory-II (BDI-II), the State and Trait Anxiety Inventory (S-STAI and T-STAI), the Stress and Coping Inventory (SCI) and the 36-Item Short Form Health Survey (SF-36). Results – MG patients reached significantly higher scores on the BDI-II and the T-STAI yielding previously undetected anxiety and depression symptoms. Significant differences were present on the SCI: higher stress scores and lower coping levels suggested impaired stress-coping strategies in migraine. MG patients achieved significantly lower scores on most of SF-36 subscales indicating lower perceived quality of life. Significant correlations were found between BDI-II, T-STAI, SCI scores and subscales of the SF-36. Conclusion – Unrecognized symptoms of anxiety and depression, as well as less effective stress-coping strategies might be related to the lower perceived quality of life in migraine. The screening of these symptoms might lead to more focused and efficient therapeutic strategies. Addressing stress management techniques could improve quality of life on the long-term.

Journal of Nursing Theory and Practice

APRIL 30, 2019

[Smoking habits and predicting factors of smoking cessation among health care workers ]

SZELKÓ Olajosné Katalin, SIKET Ujváriné Adrienn, SÁRVÁRY Attila, ZRÍNYI Miklós

[The aim of the study: The aims of the study were to determine the prevalence of smoking and identify factors that predict smoking cessation motivation among health workers. Material and method: Cross-sectional, self-reported survey filled out by all healthcare workers of Jósa András Teaching Hospital. Statistical analyses were performed by chi-square analysis and Mann-Whitney tests. Results: Of all responses (N =1561), 29.9% reported actively smoking, 52.0% smoked between 11-20 cigarettes a day. A total of 20.4% had tried to quit smoking before. Those who would not participate in a smoking cessation program outweighed those who favored participation (43.2% vs. 35.6%). Significant relationships were found between the technique of smoking cessation and intent to quit smoking (χ2 = 7,73; p = 0,02) and between smoking cessation and stress induced smoking habits (r = 0,1; p = 0,12). Those not wanting to quit smoking appraised smoking as a social link to others (Z = -2.34; p = 0,02). Conclusion: Besides putting a stronger emphasis on smoking cessation and on negative health effects of smoking, nurse managers should promote working environments where improvement in stress management and collegial relationships will minimize the need for smoke related groups.. ]

Journal of Nursing Theory and Practice

FEBRUARY 28, 2019

[Who helps the caregivers? - Psychosocial characteristics of nurses in dementia care ]

STALLER Judit, KOVÁCS Zsuzsanna, PÁLVÖLGYI Miklós

[The aim of the study: Studies underline the increasing burden of dementia people. Hungarian social care system is also facing dementia care challenge. In case of developing of social sector, it is beneficial to research the psychosocial status of nurses working in dementia care. Material and method: N=130 professional caregivers in dementia care filled out self- administered questionnaires. Standardized health-psychological scales were evaluated: SWLS, Rahe’s Life Meaning, Beck’s Inventory of Measuring Depression, Maastricht Vital Exhaustion, Freudenberger’s Burn Out Inventory. Results: Caregivers have fatigue, dissatisfaction and tendency of quitting profession. Scales show high burn-out, exhaustion and depression and show correlations. Depression correlates with vital exhaustion (r=0.549), depression moves with burn out r=0,528. SWLS correlates opposite with Vital Exhaustion: r = - 366. Coherence and SWLS shows statistically significance correlation: r=0,455. Conclusion: Indicators apply nurses are in risk conditions. More focus on workplace satisfaction, psychosocial care and stress management training is essential. .]

Journal of Nursing Theory and Practice

OCTOBER 30, 2018

[Comparative analysis of job and life satisfaction among theatre nurses in Hungary and Germany]

MÁTÉ Szilvia, PHIL. TIGGES-LIMMER Katharina, PUSZTAFALVI Henriette

[The aim of the study: The objective of the study was to assess and compare job and life satisfaction affected by workplace problems, stress, rewards, success and social support. We analyzed the coping strategies applied by the employees to solves the above problems. Material and method: The anonymous data collection was carried out in October, 2015 by applying AVEM and an own-edited socio-demographic questionnaire among theatre nurses from Hungarian and German clinics. Results: The employees evaluated stressful situations and problems differently in the two groups examined. Job satisfaction was equally important for both groups, but it affected life satisfaction of the Hungarian employees to greater extent. The stress management of the Hungarian employees was more effective in spite of the fact that German nurses used more coping strategies. Social support had a positive effect on overcoming the workplace problems in both groups. Conclusions: Job satisfaction of the nurses has a beneficial effect on their life satisfaction. The ability to divide work and private life and stress management are different among the nurses. Job satisfaction can be improved by workplace health promotion programs.]

Lege Artis Medicinae

JANUARY 20, 2019

[Animal-assisted therapies for the treatment of elderly dementia ]

SOMOGYI Szilvia

[The therapeutic value of the relationship between humans and animals should be considered in the cases of patients suffering from dementia with the onset in old age. This paper provides an overview of the animal assisted interventions in dementia. Reviews emphasize the positive effects of pet-keeping on mental and physical quality of life. However, it can also have adverse effects unless the pet is selected with caution. Regular animal assisted therapies within institutional framework provide a valuable potential programme for the patients in care. Articles published so far depict the physiological, social and psychological output variables of animal assisted therapies. The enhancement of social behavior is considered to be a specific factor of animal assisted therapies. Among the physiological symptoms the enhanced physical activity, the decrease of stress response and sympathic activation have been highlighted. Among the psychological functions reduction of state anxiety, mood lift and the reduction of negative emotions such as isolation and abandonment should be underlined. Acknowledging the available results, it seems that cognitive efficacy is less impacted directly by animal assisted therapies. However, promising results have been acquired in the alleviation of the behavioural and psychological symptoms related to dementia ]

Journal of Nursing Theory and Practice

JUNE 30, 2018

Reliability and Validity of the Turkish Version of the Brief Scales for Coping Profile in Textile Workers

ORNEK Koseoglu Ozlem, TEMEL Yavuz Guler

The aim of this study is to adapt the BSCP (Brief Scales for Coping Profile) scale to Turkish and to investigate its psychometric properties among textile workers. Methods: This a psychometric study with cross-sectional design. After translation procedures, the BSCP was administered to workers. Content validity of the BSCP was investigated with the CVI index and reliability was investigated with Cronbach’s Alpha. The construct validity was investigated with exploratory and confirmatory factor analysis. Results: The psychometric properties of the original BSCP were supported by the Turkish version of the BSCP. According to the exploratory factor analysis, the BSCP had six subscales. The reliability of the BSCP subscales’ values were 0.692, 0.712, 0.661, 0.756, 0.786, and 0.777 respectively. Conclusion: The Turkish version of the BSCP showed acceptable reliability and validity which is the first adapted scale in Turkey for evaluating workers’ coping profiles. The scale will be a good option to provide basic data about workers’ coping profiles which may be used for prolonging stress management skills and health promotion programs by occupational health and psychiatric nurses, physicians, psychologist and safety experts.

Lege Artis Medicinae

AUGUST 30, 2018

[Mobbing and bullying among physicians - when colleagues become enemies]

KAPOCSI Erzsébet

[Workplace mistreatment, mobbing, bully-ing, or psychoterror has become a prioritised field of research in social sciences in the past two-three decades. Mobbing means more than a simple conflict situation between two individuals; it is a complex problem that could and should be investigated in various individual and organisational contexts. In spite of its large-scale theoretical and empirical research, the phenomenon still does not have a uniform definition; it is most commonly de-scribed via its social manifestations. Although the interpersonal constellation of mobbing is diverse, its trigger factors, stages and participants show similar patterns. The description and the evaluation of consequences is also uniform in the literature: workplace mobbing is accompanied by considerable health impairment, and it has severe psychosomatic and mental health effects on both the targeted individuals and the whole community. The latter group has to deal with poor performance, impaired morale and dissatisfaction. All these factors add up and lead to significant financial damage as well. The prevalence of mobbing is especially high in health care. Hierarchy, continuous overload, as well as emotional and physical stress all favour the development of mobbing. In turn, the professional-social culture of medicine that is based on traditions contributes to its acceptance, understatement and denial. The first time medical students have to face psychoterror is typically during their university years. The positive aspects of socialisation and finding their vocation cannot always compensate for the negative experiences. The model role of physicians, their behaviour towards colleagues and students can be protective, but it can also trigger further mobbing. Prevention is essential both at the organisational and individual level, and it requires complex measures whose effect will only be felt in the long term. ]