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Clinical Neuroscience

NOVEMBER 30, 2020

Positive airway pressure normalizes glucose metabolism in obstructive sleep apnea independent of diabetes and obesity

KABELOĞLU Vasfiye, SENEL Benbir Gulçin, KARADENIZ Derya

The relationship among obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSAS), type 2 diabetes mellitus (DM2) and obesity is very complex and multi-directional. Obesity and increased visceral fat are important perpetuating factors for DM2 in patients with OSAS. On the other hand, OSAS itself leads to obesity by causing both leptin and insulin resistance as a consequence of activation of the sympathetic nervous system. Risk for developing DM2 further increases in patients with OSAS and obesity. Data regarding effects of positive airway pressure (PAP) therapy, gold standard treatment for OSAS, on glycemic control were inconsistent due to variability in duration of and adherence to PAP therapy. In our cohort study we investigated effects of PAP treatment on glucose metabolism in normal-weighted non-diabetic OSAS patients, in obese non-diabetic OSAS patients, and in OSAS patients with DM2. We prospectively analyzed 67 patients diagnosed with OSAS and documented to be effectively treated with PAP therapy for three months. Apnea-hypopnea index was highest in the diabetic group, being significantly higher than in the normal-weighted group (p=0.021). Mean HOMA values were significantly higher in obese (p=0.002) and diabetic group (p=0.001) than normal-weighted group; the differences were still significant after PAP therapy. HbA1c levels were significantly higher in diabetic group compared to those in normal-weighted (p=0.012) and obese (p=0.001) groups. After PAP treatment, decrease in HbA1c levels were significant in normal-weighted (p=0.008), obese (p=0.034), and diabetic (p=0.011) groups. There was no correlation with the change in HbA1c levels and age (p=0.212), BMI (p=0.322), AHI (p=0.098) or oxygen levels (p=0.122). Our study showed that treatment of OSAS by PAP therapy offers beneficial effect on glucose metabolism, not only in diabetic patients, but also in obese and normal-weighted OSAS patients. Although data regarding overall effects of PAP therapy on glycemic control present contradictory results in the literature, it should be emphasized that duration and adherence to PAP therapy were main determinants for beneficial outcome of treatment.

Hypertension and nephrology

SEPTEMBER 30, 2020

[Post-career development of cardiometabolic changes and hypertension in competitive athletes]

LELBACH Ádám, KÁNTOR Márk, KOLLER Ákos

[Regular physical activity is essential in delaying the aging processes (e.g. arterial remodelling – stiffening, metabolism, bodyweight), the beneficial effects of competitive sports – especially strength sports – according to the recent data of the literature are questionable. The beneficial effects of physical activity on the cardiovascular (CV) system are well known, however less is known regarding the delayed impacts of high intensity competitive sports on the CV system, especially after the sport career is over. This review summarizes the effects of active competitive sport and the post-career period on the cardiometabolic system with special attention to the systemic blood pressure and the development of metabolic syndrome. After sport career, the welldeveloped high performance cardiovascular- and metabolic system suddenly is much less used, but still supported by sport-level diet. It is well known that hypertension is a significant pathogenic factor in the development of cardiovascular diseases, characterized – among others – by reduced elasticity of large- and medium- sized vessels thereby importantly contributing to the development of systolic hypertension. Inflammation and thrombus formation both play an important role in the development of vascular injury and atherosclerosis. The increased tone of microvessels can impair the blood supply of certain organs, including the coronary circulation. It has been ample shown, that regular non-competitive, aerobic exercise activities are important factors in preventing hypertension. Such pathological changes become more evident after the development of post-career obesity, as well as the development of hypertension due to the activation of the renin-angiotensin system through sodium retention and other metabolic changes (increased glucose tolerance, insulin resistance, type II diabetes mellitus). It has been ample shown, that regular non-competitive, dynamic aerobic exercise activities are important factors in preventing hypertension. The frequency, intensity, type, and time (FITT) principle of exercise prescription is the first and common therapeutic approach, which represents the translation of cardiovascular basic science research results into hypertension treatment, thus can provide a personalized physical activity program/therapy according to medical needs not just for the post-career sportspersons, but the wide range of patients.]

Lege Artis Medicinae

APRIL 18, 2020

[Interrelations between antidepressants and diabetes]

HARGITTAY Csenge, GONDA Xénia, MÁRKUS Bernadett, VÖRÖS Krisztián, TABÁK Gy. Ádám, KALABAY László, RIHMER Zoltán, TORZSA Péter

[Diabetes and depression are frequent comorbidities. They are a heavy burden by themselves, however, as comorbidities increase additionally the number of diabetes-related complications, morbidity, and mortality. In the background of interrelations, there are both well-known and hypothetical mechanisms. The aim of the present review is to outline these interrelations between antidepressants and diabetes and to discuss the effect of medications on carbohydrate metabolism respectively. Anti­depressant treatment on the one hand may improve mood, cognitive function and medication adherence leading to an improved glucose metabolism, on the other hand through their metabolic side effects, they may worsen carbohydrate metabolism. Concerning metabolic side effects, selec­tive serotonin reuptake inhibitors are the sa­fest, while tricyclic antidepressants and mo­noamine oxidase inhibitors should be administered under close monitoring. Se­rotonin and noradrenaline reuptake inhibitors may deteriorate gly­cae­mic control via increased noradre­nergic activation. Novel antidepressants, how­ever, have a neutral or positive impact on gly­caemic measures. Screening for and temporally adjusted treatment of depres­sion may decrease the risk of comorbidities ge­nerated complications. While caring for diabetic patients with depression, one should consider metabolic side effects of antidepressants and close monitoring of carbohydrate metabolism.]

Hypertension and nephrology

APRIL 24, 2020

[Possibilities and limitations. Dietary difficulties of chronic renal failure in childhood]

REUSZ György, SZABÓ Adrienn

[In chronic kidney disease (CKD), the role of the kidney in assuring homeostasis is gradually deteriorating. Besides fluid, electrolyte and hormonal disturbances, detoxification and control of blood pressure is insufficient without external help. In children, in addition to achieving equilibrium it is also essential to ensure optimal physical and cognitive/psychological development. Adequate calorie intake is a major determinant of growth during infancy. Among the therapeutic options it is essential to ensure a proper diet. In addition to reflecting the special needs of renal failure in its composition, it must be palatable for the child. Children with kidney disease should have a normal energy diet. Protein intake should not be reduced from the baseline recommendation, but lower phosphorus and high bioavailability should be preferred. A low sodium and potassium diet is recommended for a significant proportion of patients and is based on dietary advice. Further, diet planning may be problematic if the child has special dietary requirements and is in need of nasogastric tube feeding. Because diet planning is a complex task, it is difficult to achieve optimal protein supply and mineral restriction along with high energy intake. In such cases, enteral nutrition with special formulas/ drinks developed for pediatric nutrition may provide a solution.]

Clinical Neuroscience

NOVEMBER 30, 2019

[Tracing trace elements in mental functions]

JANKA Zoltán

[Trace elements are found in the living organism in small (trace) amounts and are mainly essential for living functions. Essential trace elements are in humans the chromium (Cr), cobalt (Co), copper (Cu), fluorine (F), iodine (I), iron (Fe), manganese (Mn), molybdenum (Mo), selenium (Se), zinc (Zn), and questionably the boron (B) and vanadium (V). According to the biopsychosocial concept, mental functions have biological underpinnings, therefore the impairment of certain neurochemical processes due to shortage of trace elements may have mental consequences. Scientific investigations indicate the putative role of trace element deficiency in psychiatric disorders such in depression (Zn, Cr, Se, Fe, Co, I), premenstrual dysphoria (Cr), schizophrenia (Zn, Se), cognitive deterioration/de­mentia (B, Zn, Fe, Mn, Co, V), mental retardation (I, Mo, Cu), binge-eating (Cr), autism (Zn, Mn, Cu, Co) and attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (Fe). At the same time, the excess quantity (chronic exposure, genetic error) of certain trace elements (Cu, Mn, Co, Cr, Fe, V) can also lead to mental disturbances (depression, anxiety, psychosis, cognitive dysfunction, insomnia). Lithium (Li), being efficacious in the treatment of bipolar mood disorder, is not declared officially as a trace element. Due to nutrition (drinking water, food) the serum Li level is about a thousand times less than that used in therapy. However, Li level in the red cells is lower as the membrane sodium-Li countertransport results in a Li efflux. Nevertheless, the possibility that Li is a trace element has emerged as studies indicate its potential efficacy in such a low concentration, since certain geographic regions show an inverse correlation between the Li level of drinking water and the suicide rate in that area. ]

Hypertension and nephrology

OCTOBER 23, 2019

[GLP-1 receptor agonists in the treatment of type 2 diabetes]

WINKLER Gábor

[The glucagon-like peptide (GLP)-1 receptor agonists and somewhat later, the sodium-glucose cotransporter (SGLT) -2 inhibitors have brought new perspectives in the antihyperglycemic treatment of type 2 diabetes. The article overviews clinicopharmacologic characteristics of the GLP-1 receptor agonist group, their glycemic and non-glycemic effects, results of the cardiovascular endpoint studies as well as their place in the recent therapeutic guidelines. It is proven, that both glycemic and weight reducing effect is greater of the long-acting (non-prandial) coumpounds as compared to that of the short acting (prandial) derivates, further, that in studies with cardiovascular endpoints they reduced the relative risk of the composite endpoint of non-fatal myocardial infarct, non-fatal stroke and cardiovascular death. Due to the favolurable glycemic and non-glycemic properties their use is advised already in the early course of type 2 diabetes, as combination of the metformin therapy.]

Hypertension and nephrology

JUNE 20, 2019

[Hyperuricemia in hypertension. Domestic experience based on the data of the Hungarian Hypertonia Register 2011., 2013., 2015. Part II.]

ALFÖLDI Sándor, PAKSY András, KÉKES Ede

[Asymptomatic hyperuricemia is frequent in hypertension and its prevalence is increasing. Authors studied the incidence of serum uric acid levels and its correlation with age, risk factors, anthropological, metabolic characteristics, blood pressure, blood pressure target, organ damage, age-related co-morbidity in 47,372 hypertensive patients (22,688 males, 24,694 women). In the second part of their analysis the prevalence of hyperuricemia was 13.8% in hypertensive men and 21.6% in women. The age, BMI, waist diameter, systolic and diastolic blood pressure and onset of hypertension, serum cholesterol, triglyceride, blood glucose and serum creatinine were slightly higher, but serum HDL cholesterol and eGFR were slightly lower in hyperuricemic hypertensive patients, independently of their gender. Among hypertension mediated organ damage ischemic and left ventricular hypertensive ECG alterations, mild chronic kidney disease and proteinuria, among hypertension associated diseases diabetes associated ischemic heart disease, chronic kidney disease associated diabetes and both ischemic and chronic kidney disease associated diabetes were significantly more frequent in hyperuricemic hypertensive patients.]

Clinical Neuroscience

MAY 30, 2019

Population-based stroke screening days in the 12th district of Budapest in 2011 and 2016 - What have and what have not changed?

FOLYOVICH András, BOTOS Nóra, BALOGH Erzsébet, BAKOS Mária, HERTELENDY Anna, BÉRES-MOLNÁR Anna Katalin

Introduction - Population-based screening is an option to identify persons at high risk for stroke. However it is associated with rather high expenses, necessitating the selection of effective methods that take local characteristics into account. The 12th district of Budapest has a long tradition of population-based screening for frequent and preventable diseases. The Szent János Hospital hosts an annual stroke screening day. In the present study, previously published data from the 2011 screening were compared with those obtained in 2016, looking for changes and tendencies throughout the examined period. Subjects and methods - The screening day was conducted in a generally similar way in 2011 and 2016. Similarly to the previous event, the program was organized on a Saturday, the call for the event was spread by the local newspaper. The crew composition was the same. As regards the components of the screening (currently including general history taking, risk status assessment, blood pressure measurement, BMI assessment, cholesterol and blood glucose tests, carotid duplex ultrasonography, and ophthalmological examination), the only difference was the absence of cardiologic examination (it was conducted on an independent day). The anonymous data sheet was the same. Results - The number of participants in the 2016 event was 33, to provide more comfortable conditions. The female predominance was slightly less pronounced but was still present in 2016 (60.6% vs. 72.9%). The mean age became substantially higher (71.2 y vs. 62.9 y). The ratios of participants with higher level of education (97% vs. 94%) and those who are married were still remarkable. The most frequent risk factors were the same; however the ratio of participants with hypertension, ‘other heart disease’, and diabetes increased, whereas that of with hyperlipidemia and obesity decreased. The incidence of atrial fibrillation was unaltered. None of the participants in 2016 admitted smoking (previously this ratio was 20.8%) or drinking heavily. The findings of the carotid ultrasonography revealed a more favorable vascular status. Ophthalmological assessments (predominantly hypertensive alterations on fundoscopy) revealed that the pathological vs. physiological ratio switched to 1:2 from 2:1. The final evaluation of the screening program likewise demonstrated an improved overall state of health of the population. Conclusions - We observed a more favorable stroke risk status of the population in 2016. Whether it is indeed a tendency unknown at present. The role of the local media in calling for screening is still decisive, and the cohesive power of the family is important.

Hypertension and nephrology

MAY 10, 2019

[Diabetology in dialysis]

MÁCSAI Emília, HALMAI Richárd, NEMERE Éva, BRASNYÓ Pál, KISS István

[According to epidemiological data, the number of diabetic patients requiring dialysis is increasing. Burnt-out diabetes, new onset diabetes during chronic dialysis treatment and new onset diabetes after transplantation diabetes are new types of diabetes compared to the traditional division forms. It is utmost important to evaluate education ability and acceptance the core values of lifestyle changes. Clear guidelines for oral anti-diabetic and insulin therapy have not yet been developed since this group of patients did not participate in previous major surveys. In order to formulate individualized therapeutic recommendations, it is imperative to perform regular glucose self-monitoring, which is also the cornerstone of solving unexpected situations. Both in hemodialysis and peritoneal dialysis, special considerations should be applied to the diabetic patient group, this review focuses on the current understanding of available relevant knowledge and summarizes presumably extrarenal diabetic complications as well.]

Lege Artis Medicinae

SEPTEMBER 20, 2018

[Differential diagnosis and treatment of hyponatraemia]

NÉMETH Zsófia, DEÁK György

[Hyponatraemia (serum sodium concentration < 136 mmol/l) is the most frequent electrolyte abnormality that inceases the risk of both in-hospital, and outpatient mortality. Antidiuretic hormone action or low glomerular fitration rate or low excretable osmoles or their combination are involved in its pathogenesis. Differential diagnosis is based on medical and medication histories, serum- and urine osmolality and urine sodium concentration. Measurement of fractional excretions of urea and uric acid help identifying low effective circulting volume, renal hypoperfusion. Symptomatic hyponatraemia or an acute decrease of serum sodium concentration exceeding 10 mmol/l should be treated with 3% NaCl to avoid impending threat to life. The principles of the treatment of chronic hyponatraemia are restriction of water intake and elimination of etiologic factor(s) (eg. medications - most often thiazides). In case of contracted axtracellular volume, isotonic saline should be given. In case of euvolaemia, restriciton of water intake is fundamental. In case of expanded extracellular volume, (heart failure, liver cirrhosis, nephrosis), water and NaCl intake should be restricted along with aldosteron antagonist and loop diuretic therapy. In chronic hyponatraemia, the rise of serum sodium concentration should not exceed 10 mmol/l during the first 24 hours and 8 mmol/l/day thereafter. ]