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Clinical Oncology

APRIL 10, 2019

[Metals and cancer]

VETLÉNYI Enikő, RÁCZ Gergely

[We often tend to forget about our environment when looking for the origin of a disease. Inhaled air, drinking water and food, substances in contact with the skin all have an effect on the human body. Metals are indispensable parts of our everyday lives, their mining, processing and use cause a continuous exposure to them. Metal exert their effects on the body in various ways. Many of them are essential for maintaining homeostasis, but excessive or harmful metal intake can lead to health damage, including tumour formation through multiple attack points. Metals substitute each other during different transport processes and in the structure of proteins, they cause oxidative stress and bind to DNA, thereby damaging it. Applying them appropriately, the proapoptotic effect of the metal compounds is brought to the fore, thus becoming a therapeutic tool for tumours. Nowadays, platinum(II) compounds are widely used as chemotherapeutic agents and there are many ongoing studies to fi nd metal compounds with an ideal therapeutic and side-effect profi le. The aims of this article were to draw the attention to the dangers of metals in relation to cancer and to highlight their diverse application possibilities in current and future cancer therapy and diagnostics.]

Hypertension and nephrology

SEPTEMBER 30, 2020

[Post-career development of cardiometabolic changes and hypertension in competitive athletes]

LELBACH Ádám, KÁNTOR Márk, KOLLER Ákos

[Regular physical activity is essential in delaying the aging processes (e.g. arterial remodelling – stiffening, metabolism, bodyweight), the beneficial effects of competitive sports – especially strength sports – according to the recent data of the literature are questionable. The beneficial effects of physical activity on the cardiovascular (CV) system are well known, however less is known regarding the delayed impacts of high intensity competitive sports on the CV system, especially after the sport career is over. This review summarizes the effects of active competitive sport and the post-career period on the cardiometabolic system with special attention to the systemic blood pressure and the development of metabolic syndrome. After sport career, the welldeveloped high performance cardiovascular- and metabolic system suddenly is much less used, but still supported by sport-level diet. It is well known that hypertension is a significant pathogenic factor in the development of cardiovascular diseases, characterized – among others – by reduced elasticity of large- and medium- sized vessels thereby importantly contributing to the development of systolic hypertension. Inflammation and thrombus formation both play an important role in the development of vascular injury and atherosclerosis. The increased tone of microvessels can impair the blood supply of certain organs, including the coronary circulation. It has been ample shown, that regular non-competitive, aerobic exercise activities are important factors in preventing hypertension. Such pathological changes become more evident after the development of post-career obesity, as well as the development of hypertension due to the activation of the renin-angiotensin system through sodium retention and other metabolic changes (increased glucose tolerance, insulin resistance, type II diabetes mellitus). It has been ample shown, that regular non-competitive, dynamic aerobic exercise activities are important factors in preventing hypertension. The frequency, intensity, type, and time (FITT) principle of exercise prescription is the first and common therapeutic approach, which represents the translation of cardiovascular basic science research results into hypertension treatment, thus can provide a personalized physical activity program/therapy according to medical needs not just for the post-career sportspersons, but the wide range of patients.]

Clinical Neuroscience

SEPTEMBER 30, 2020

Neuroscience highlights: Main cell types underlying memory and spatial navigation

KRABOTH Zoltán, KÁLMÁN Bernadette

Interest in the hippocampal formation and its role in navigation and memory arose in the second part of the 20th century, at least in part due to the curious case of Henry G. Molaison, who underwent brain surgery for intractable epilepsy. The temporal association observed between the removal of his entorhinal cortex along with a significant part of hippocampus and the developing severe memory deficit inspired scientists to focus on these regions. The subsequent discovery of the so-called place cells in the hippocampus launched the description of many other functional cell types and neuronal networks throughout the Papez-circuit that has a key role in memory processes and spatial information coding (speed, head direction, border, grid, object-vector etc). Each of these cell types has its own unique characteristics, and together they form the so-called “Brain GPS”. The aim of this short survey is to highlight for practicing neurologists the types of cells and neuronal networks that represent the anatomical substrates and physiological correlates of pathological entities affecting the limbic system, especially in the temporal lobe. For that purpose, we survey early discoveries along with the most relevant neuroscience observations from the recent literature. By this brief survey, we highlight main cell types in the hippocampal formation, and describe their roles in spatial navigation and memory processes. In recent decades, an array of new and functionally unique neuron types has been recognized in the hippocampal formation, but likely more remain to be discovered. For a better understanding of the heterogeneous presentations of neurological disorders affecting this anatomical region, insights into the constantly evolving neuroscience behind may be helpful. The public health consequences of diseases that affect memory and spatial navigation are high, and grow as the population ages, prompting scientist to focus on further exploring this brain region.

Hypertension and nephrology

JUNE 24, 2020

[Hypertension and Covid-19 – Part I. Significance of age, underlying diseases, and ACEI/ARB therapy in hypertension and co-morbidities during SARS-Cov2 infection]

KÉKES Ede, SZÉKÁCS Béla, NAGY Judit, KOVÁCS Tibor

[The appearance of the Covid-19 epidemic in different continents shows specific clinical features. Confirmed infected patients are detectable from approximately 30 years, with a maximum between 40 and 70 years of age. At the same time, however, a significant proportion of those who die from the infection come from patients over 65 years. The prevalence and mortality rates of the hypertensive population show a very similar formation. Based on the data collected, it is not surprising that hypertension as the underlying disease in the Covid- 19 epidemic is the first in all analysis. A more precise analysis clarified that it is not hypertension per se, but co-morbidities and complications of hypertension that play a primary role behind large-scale mortality in old age, such as diabetes, coronary heart disease, stroke, heart failure, and chronic kidney disease. Data from China, North America, and Italy suggest that hypertension and diabetes – and in North America, pathological obesity – in infected patients actually only reflect the prevalence of these diseases in a given population. The presence of comorbidities (coronary artery disease, stroke, heart failure, arrhythmia, chronic kidney disease) – based on multivariate logistic regression analysis – presents a more risk for severe clinical course and mortality. Some recent analyses have provided strong evidence that ACEI/ARB treatment does not pose a higher risk for the course or outcome of infection. Their administration is constantly needed in hypertension and comorbidities due to their organ protective and slowing the progression of diseases.]

Clinical Neuroscience

JANUARY 30, 2020

[Current questions of multiple sclerosis: the secunder progressive form of the disease]

VÉCSEI László

[Recent data suggest that long-term worsening is common in relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis patients and is largely independent of relapses or new lesion formation on brain MRI. The current definition of secunder progressive multiple sclerosis is worsening of disability independent of relapses over at least 6-month interval. Early focal inflammatory disease activity and spinal cord lesion are predictors of very-long term disease outcomes in relapse - onset multiple sclerosis. The potential of PET imaging to visualize hidden inflammation in MS brain in vivo is an important contribution for better understanding the progression of the disease. Therefore, PET imaging is a promising tool in detecting the conversion from relapsing remitting multiple sclerosis to secunder progressive form of multiple sclerosis. Furthermore, neuro-axonal damage is the pathological substrate of permanent disability in different neurological disorders including multiple sclerosis. The neurofilament proteins have promise in this context because their levels rise upon neuro-axonal damage not only in the cerebrospinal fluid but also in blood. Patients with increased serum levels of neurofilament at baseline, independent of other clinical and MRI variables, experience significantly more brain and spinal cord volume loss over 2 years and 5 years of follow-up. The kynurenine-pathway abnormalities may be associated with the swich from early-mild stage multiple sclerosis to debilitating progressive forms of the disease. Analysis of these metabolites in serum may have application as multiple sclerosis disease biomarkers. Free radical action has been suggested as a causal factor in the illness. Increased free radical production and consumption of the scavenger molecules were found during the active phase of the disease. Based on the clinical findings (EXPAND Study) and pathomechanism of the disease siponimod is approved by the US Food and Drug Administration for the treatment of relapsing remitting forms of multiple sclerosis, to include secunder progressive multiple sclerosis with active disease, relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis and clinically isolated syndrome.]

Lege Artis Medicinae

DECEMBER 10, 2018

[Identity formation of novel psychoactive substance users. Thematic content analysis of life narratives ]

ERDŐS Márta, SZIJJÁRTÓ Linda, VOJTEK Éva, KÁRPÁTI Tamás, ROZGONYI Róbert, KELEMEN Gábor

[Authors rely on Susan Greenfield’s identity theory to explore life narratives of novel psychoactive substance users in a Hunga­rian sample (n=24). Main nodes of the conceptual network identified in the computer-aided content analysis were personal and institutional relational networks, processing of emotions and sensory experi-ence seeking.]

Lege Artis Medicinae

JUNE 20, 2018

[“Vires unitae agunt” - way of the unification: medical professionalization in 18-19. centuries Hungary]

SIMON Katalin

[European and Hungarian medicine and its representatives changed a lot between the sixteenth and nineteenth centuries. The varied ’medical market’ altered significantly from the eighteenth century. The acts of the enlightened absolutism, which were attentive to the health of the citizens and the public, set up those processes, which led to modern medical education and medical professionalization. During this process, some kind of healers were raised out of craftsmen, folk healers (such as surgeons, pharmacists, midwives, veterinarians), others were supplanted (for Example sellers of essential oils). After the initiation from above, doctors of medicine and masters of surgery became self-conscious in the Hungarian Reform Era, first forms of self-organization, as so the demand of professional retraining and discussions appeared via the new journals, associations and assemblies. The biggest question was the liquidation and the unification of the dual education of doctors of medicine and masters of surgery, which descended from the Middle Ages, but became obsolete, thanks to the new achievements of the medicine and surgery. The two were united in 1872, when the title doctor medicinae universalis set up. The Public Health Act of Hungary in 1876 (Art. XIV) and the independent la­bour organizations of doctors (for Example the Associations of Doctors in Budapest and in the countryside, which were established in 1897) promoted the formation of the modern medical profession. ]

Clinical Neuroscience

JANUARY 30, 2018

Insights into the structure and function of the hippocampal formation: Relevance to Parkinson’s disease

GYÖRFI Orsolya, NAGY Helga, BOKOR Magdolna, KÉRI Szabolcs

The link between the hippocampus and declarative memory dysfunctions following the removal of the medial temporal lobe opened unexplored fields in neuroscience. In the first part of our review, we summarized current theoretical frameworks discussing the role of hippocampus in learning and memory. Several theories are highlighted suggesting that the hippocampus is responsible for assembling stimulus elements into a unitary representation that later can be utilized to simulate future events. The hippocampal formation has been implicated in a growing number of disorders, from neurodegenerative diseases to atypical cognitive ageing and depression. Recent neuroimaging studies provided new opportunities to study in detail the hippocampal formation’s role in higher levels of the nervous system. We will present data regarding the regional specialization of the hippocampus in experimental models developed for healthy and neurological conditions with a special focus on Parkinson’s disease. Combined evidence from neuroimaging studies suggested that hippocampal volume is reduced in non-demented, newly diagnosed patients with Parkinson’s disease, which is associated with impaired memory performance. These findings proposed that, beyond the well-known striatal dopamine loss, impaired hippocampal synaptic plasticity may contribute to cognitive and affective impairments in early Parkinson’s disease.

Journal of Nursing Theory and Practice

FEBRUARY 28, 2017

[Advantages of the bevel down puncture technique]

SOMOSI László, KISS Szilvia, LADÁNYI Erzsébet

[The arterio-venous fistula is also called the dialysis patient’s lifeline. The name lifeline stands for the essential connection between the body and the dialysis machine. Keeping it in good condition is very important, because fistulas play a keyrole in the successful dialysis treatment. Fistula care is indispensable both from the nurse and patient side. The dialysis team is responsible for the fistula puncture and care. We introduced the bevel down puncture technique in November of 2011 for better arterio-venous shunt care. Our dialysis nurses were trained on the correct position of the fistula needle. We emphasised the benefits and long-term effects. We use this technique for all patients, except for the first fistula puncture. The bevel down puncture technique reduces the patient’s fear of fistula puncture as it causes less pain. After removal of the needle, the bleeding time decreased from the approximate 6-7 minutes to less than 5 minutes and bleeding volume is also decreased. It also reduces the size of the scab and the aneurysm formation. In our dialysis unit we have had good experiences with the bevel down puncturing technique, as it kept our patients’ fistulas in good condition, this may prolong vascular accesses lifetime.]

Hypertension and nephrology

DECEMBER 20, 2016

[New development in the pathogenesis, diagnosis and treatment of IgA nephropathy]

NAGY Judit, VAS Tibor, KOVÁCS Tibor

[IgA nephropathy is one of the leading cause of primary glomerulonephritis worldwide. IgA nephropathy is regarded as an immune mediated disease with a multi-hit pathogenesis starting with the production of poorly glycosylated IgA1 and glycan-specific IgG and IgA autoantibodies leading to the formation of IgA1 containing immune complexes. These immune complexes deposit in the glomerular mesangium followed by the onset of mesangioproliferative glomerulonephritis. The disease has variable clinical presentation and outcome. There is a need to identify patients who have the potential to progress to end-stage renal disease with the help of clinical, histological and biological markers. Treatment options for IgA nephropathy are largely based on opinion or weak evidence. It is true for the KDIGO Clinical Practice Guideline for Glomerulonephritis treatment recommendations containing low level of evidence for almost all recommendations related to IgA nephropathy. It is suggested to separate the patients into 3 groups on the basis of risk to progression and to give not-specific supportive treatment (especially angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitors or angiotensin receptor blocking agents) to all of them on the basis of the risk factors. We discuss the recommendations of the KDIGO Guideline about steroid and immunosuppressive treatment for moderate and high risk patients. Lastly, we provide our perspective on the existing other treatment options (tonsillectomy etc.) and on ongoing clinical trials.]