Search results

Clinical Neuroscience

MARCH 30, 2016

[The importance of anticoagulant therapy in patients with artial fibrillation in stroke prevention – summary of international data and novel therapeutic modalities]

MIROLOVICS Ágnes, PAPP Csaba, ZSUGA Judit, BERECZKI Dániel

[The most common cardiogenic cause of ischaemic stroke is atrial fibrillation which increases the probability of stroke five-fold and doubles case fatality. Based on international data the incidence of atrial fibrillation is approx. 2% however this rapidly increases with age. The necessity of using oral anticoagulants in the prevention of non-valvular atrial fibrillation related stroke is decided based on estimated stroke risk. The CHADS2 and the more predictive CHA2DS2-VASc scales are used for this purpose while the bleeding risk of patients treated with anticoagulant may be estimated by the HAS-BLED scoring scale. For decades oral anticoagulation meant using vitamin-K antagonists. Based on international data we can see that rate of anticoagulation is unacceptably low, furthermore most of the anticoagulated patients aren’t within the therapeutic range of INR (INR: 2-3). A lot of disadvantages of vitamin-K antagonists are known (e.g. food-drug interaction, need for regular coagulation monitoring, increased risk of bleeding), therefore compounds with new therapeutic target have been developed. The novel oral anticoagulants (NOAC) can be divided in two major subgroups: direct thrombin inhibitors (dabigatran etexilate) and Xa-factor inhibitors (rivaroxaban, apixaban, edoxaban). These products are administered in fix doses, they less frequently interact with other medications or food, and regular coagulation monitoring is not needed when using these drugs. Moreover several studies have shown that they are at least as effective in the prevention of ischaemic stroke than the vitamin-K antagonists, with no more haemorrhagic complications.]

Clinical Neuroscience

SEPTEMBER 30, 2019

[The Expanded Disability Status Scale scoring in patients with multiple sclerosis]

FÜVESI Judit

[Gait disturbance is a major symptom in patients with multiple sclerosis. The Expanded Disability Status Scale (EDSS) was first used in clinical trials of multiple sclerosis for the assessment of disability, however it has become more and more widely used in clinical practice as well. Nowadays its use is essential in application of the new diagnostic criteria, the new clinical form classification and in monitoring the efficacy of therapies. EDSS is based on a standardised neurological examination, but focuses on those symptoms that are frequent in multiple sclerosis. Based on the examination it assesses seven functional systems: visual, brainstem, pyramidal, cerebellar, sensory, bowel-bladder and cerebral functions. EDSS scores can be determined based on the scores given in the functional systems and on testing the walking distance. In newer versions the “Ambulation score” has been added. This chapter clarifies the scores based on the maximal walking distance and the need for a walking aid to walk this distance. The Neurostatus/EDSS training method improves the reproducibility of the standardised neurological examination that forms the basis of the EDSS scoring. Of the tests assessing walking, the Timed-25 Foot Walk Test and the self-administered 12-Item Multiple Sclerosis Walking Scale are suitable for routine evaluation of walking performance. An increase of more than 20% in the Timed-25 Foot Walk may be considered a significant change in gait. ]

Clinical Neuroscience

JULY 30, 2019

Relationship between Status Epilepticus Severity Score and etiology in adult NCSE patients

GENC Fatma, ERDAL Abidin, AKCA Gizem, KARACAY Ertan, GÖKSU Özaydın Eylem, KUTLU Gülnihal, GÖMCELI Bicer Yasemin

Purpose - Nonconvulsive status epilepticus (NCSE) is a heterogeneous, severe neurological disorder of different etiologies. In this study, the outcomes of NCSE episodes was assessed in a large series of adult patients. Our objective was to evaluate relationship between Status Epilepticus Severity Score (STESS) and etiology and the role of etiological factors on predicting the outcomes. Method - In this retrospective study, the medical records of 95 patients over 18 years of age who were diagnosed with NCSE between June 2011 and December 2015 were reviewed. Their treatment and follow-up for NCSE was performed at the Epilepsy Unit in Department of Neurology, Antalya Research and Training Hospital. Etiological factors thought to be responsible for NCSE episodes as well as the prognostic data were retrieved. The etiological factors were classified into three groups as those with a known history of epilepsy (Group 1), primary neurological disorder (Group 2), or systemic/unknown etiology (Group 3). STESS was retrospectively applied to patients. Results - There were 95 participants, 59 of whom were female. Group 1, Group 2, and Group 3 consisted of 11 (7 female), 54 (33 female), and 30 (19 female) patients, respectively. Of the 18 total deaths, 12 occurred in Group 2, and 6 in Group 3. The negative predictive value for a STESS score of ≤ 2 was 93.88% (+LR 2.05 95% CI: 1.44-2.9 and -LR 0.3 95% CI 0.10-0.84 ) in the overall study group. While the corresponding values for Group 1 (patients with epilepsy), Group 2 (patients with primary neurological disorder), and group 3 (patients with systemic or unknown etiology) were 100%, 92.59% (+LR 2.06 95%CI: 1.32-3.21 and -LR 0.28 95% CI 0.08-1.02 ) 83.33% (+LR 1.14 95%CI: 0.59-2.9 and -LR 0.80 95% CI 0.23-2.73). Conclusions - This study included the one of the largest patients series ever reported in whom STESS, a clinical scoring system proposed for use in patients with status epilepticus, has been implemented. Although STESS appeared to be quite useful for predicting a favorable outcome in NCSE patients with epilepsy and primary neurological disorders, its predictive value in patients with systemic or unknown etiology was lower. Further prospective studies including larger NCSE samples are warranted.

Clinical Neuroscience

JULY 30, 2017

Validation of the Hungarian version of the Test Your Memory

KOLOZSVÁRI Róbert László, KOVÁCS György Zoltán, SZŐLLŐSI József Gergő, HARSÁNYI Szilvia, FRECSKA Ede, ÉGERHÁZI Anikó

Concerns regarding the projected prevalence of Alzheimer’s disease (AD) over the next several decades have stimulated a need for the detection of AD in its earliest stages. A self-administered cognitive test (Test Your Memory, TYM) is designed as a short, cognitive screening tool for the detection of AD. Our aim was to validate the Hungarian version of the Test Your Memory (TYM-HUN) test for the detection of AD. The TYM-HUN was applied in case of individuals aged 60 years or more, 50 patients with AD and 50 healthy controls were recruited into the study. We compared the diagnostic utility of the Hungarian version of the TYM in AD with that of the Mini-Mental State Examination (MMSE). The sensitivity and specificity of the TYM-HUN in the detection of Alzheimer’s disease were determined. The patients with AD scored an average of 15.5/30 on the MMSE and 20.3/50 on the TYM-HUN. The average score achieved by the members of the healthy control group was 27.3/30 on the MMSE and 42.7/50 on the TYM. The total TYM-HUN scores significantly correlated with the MMSE scores (Spearman’s rho, r=0.8830; p<0.001). Multivariate logistic regression model demonstrated that a one-point increase in the TYM score reduced the probability of having AD by 36%. The optimal cut-off score on the TYM-HUN was 35/36 along with 94% sensitivity and 94% specificity for the detection of AD. The TYM has a much wider scoring range than the MMSE and is also a suitable screening tool for memory problems, furthermore, it fulfils the requirements of being a short cognitive test for the non-specialists. The TYM-HUN is useful for the detection of Alzheimer’s disease and can be applied as a screening test in Hungarian memory clinics as well as in primary care settings.

Clinical Neuroscience

MAY 25, 2014

[Temperature sensitivity of some nerve conduction parameters in diabetic polyneuropathy]

HIDASI Eszter, DIÓSZEGHY Péter, KÁPLÁR Miklós, MECHLER Ferenc, BERECZKI Dániel

[Background - We tested whether in diabetic polyneuropathy the temperature dependence of the median nerve conduction parameters reflects the severity of neuropathy. Methods - We validated an electrophysiological score against clinical signs of polyneuropathy. Electroneurography was performed at temperatures from 20-40 °C in diabetic patients with mild, moderate and severe neuropathy and controls. Results - The electrophysiological score reflected the clinical severity of polyneuropathy. At room temperature there were significant differences among groups in almost all parameters. In thermal sensitivity studies were significant differences in distal and proximal motor and sensory areas and in sensory conduction velocities. These four parameters normalized to 1 °C change in temperature also significantly differed among the four groups and were largest in controls and smallest in severe polyneuropathy. Conclusions - The use of an integral parameter - areas are essentially amplitudes integrated over time - increases the probability of detecting decreased thermal sensitivity of peripheral nerves in diabetes.]

Clinical Neuroscience

JANUARY 30, 2014

[Sleep-EEG in dizygotic twins discordant for Williams syndrome]

BÓDIZS Róbert, GOMBOS Ferenc, SZŐCS Katalin, RÉTHELYI M. János, GERVÁN Patrícia, KOVÁCS Ilona

[Background and purpose - Reports on twin pairs concordant and discordant for Williams syndrome were published before, but no study unravelled sleep physiology in these cases yet. We aim to fill this gap by analyzing sleep records of a twin pair discordant for Williams syndrome extending our focus on presleep wakefulness and sleep spindling. Methods - We performed multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification of the 7q11.23 region of a 17 years old dizygotic opposite-sex twin pair discordant for Williams syndrome. Polysomnography of laboratory sleep at this age was analyzed and followed-up after 1.5 years by ambulatory polysomnography. Sleep stages scoring, EEG power spectra and sleep spindle analyses were carried out. Results - The twin brother showed reduced levels of amplification for all of the probes in the 7q11.23 region indicating a typical deletion spanning at least 1.038 Mb between FKBP6 and CLIP2. The results of the twin sister showed normal copy numbers in the investigated region. Lower sleep times and efficiencies, as well as higher slow wave sleep percents of the twin brother were evident during both recordings. Roughly equal NREM, Stage 2 and REM sleep percents were found. EEG analyses revealed state and derivation- independent decreases in α power, lack of an α spectral peak in presleep wakefulness, as well as higher NREM sleep σ peak frequency in the twin brother. Faster sleep spindles with lower amplitude and shorter duration characterized the records of the twin brother. Spectra show a striking reliability and correspondence between the two situations (laboratory vs. home records). Conclusion - Alterations in sleep and specific neural oscillations including the α/σ waves are inherent aspects of Williams syndrome.]

Clinical Neuroscience

JANUARY 25, 2013

[Early mental test - developing a screening test for mild cognitive impairment]

KÁLMÁN János, PÁKÁSKI Magdolna, HOFFMANN Ildikó, DRÓTOS Gergely, DARVAS Gyöngyi, BODA Krisztina, BENCSIK Tamás, GYIMESI Alíz, GULYÁS Zsófia, BÁLINT Magdolna, SZATLÓCZKI Gréta, PAPP Edina

[Background and purpose - Mild cognitive impairment (MCI) is a heterogenous syndrome considered as a prodromal state of dementia with clinical importance in the early detection of Alzheimer’s Disease. We are currently developing an MCI screening instrument, the Early Mental Test (EMT) suitable to the needs of primary care physicians. The present study describes the validation process of the 6.2 version of the test. Methods - Only subjects (n=132, female 95, male 37) over the age of 55 (mean age 69.2 years (SD=6.59)) scoring at least 20 points on Mini-Mental State Examination (MMSE), mean education 11.17 years (SD=3.86) were included in the study. The psychometric evaluation consisted of Alzheimer’s Disease Assessment Scale Cognitive subscale (ADAS-Cog) and the 6.2 version of EMT. The statistical analyses were carried out using the 17.00 version of SPSS statistical package. Results - The optimalised cut-off point was found to be 3.45 points with corresponding 69% sensitivity, 69% specificity and 69% accuracy measures. The Cronbach-α, that describes the internal consistence of the test was 0.667, which is higher as compared with the same category in the case of the ADASCog (0.446). A weak negative rank correlation was found between the total score of EMT 6.2 and the age of probands (rs=-0.25, p=0.003). Similarly, only a weak correlation was found between the education levels and the total score of EMT 6.2 (rs=0.31, p<0.001). Two of the subtests, the repeated delayed short-time memory and the letter fluency test with a motorical distraction task had significantly better power to separate MCI and control groups than the other subtests of the EMT. Conclusion - The 6.2 version of EMT is a fast and simple detector of MCI with a similar sensitivity-specificity profile to the MMSE, but this version of the test definitely needs further development.]

Lege Artis Medicinae

DECEMBER 20, 2007

[MYELODYSPLASTIC SYNDROMES - NEW THERAPEUTIC OPTIONS]

GADÓ Klára

[Myelodysplastic syndrome is a heterogeneous group of acquired clonal disorders of the haematopoietic stem cell characterized by ineffective haematopoiesis, peripheral cytopenia, and a high risk of progression to acute leukaemia. It is a common malignant disease with an increased incidence in the elderly population. Classification is based on a 1999 WHO recommendation, in which morphological features as well as clinical and cytogenetic characteristics are taken into account. Combined with the International Prognostic Scoring System (1997), it is suitable to predict prognosis and response to therapy. Clinical features include symptoms caused by anaemia, infections, and bleeding. Diagnosis is based on peripheral cytopenia and dysplastic morphology, as well as normal or increased cellularity in the bone marrow, with more than 10% of dysplastic cells. The verification of cytogenetic abnormalities is important both for confirming the diagnosis and predicting the prognosis. When designing the treatment strategy, it is essential to take the risk of leukaemia into account. On the other hand, the general state of the patient and the presence of accompanying diseases should also be considered. The goal of the treatment is to increase cell count and to decrease transfusion requirement, eventually to improve quality of life. Supportive therapy is an essential part of the management. In addition, growth factors, immunosuppressive and immunomodulatory agents, low-dose chemotherapy may be applied. Today, cure can only be achieved by allogenic stem cell transplantation. Recent findings in the epigenetic intracellular regulation allowed the definition of new therapeutic targets to develop drugs such as inhibitors of DNA methyltransferase and histone deacetylase.]

Hungarian Radiology

DECEMBER 27, 2010

[Necrotizing enterocolitis in neonatology: comparing the role of X-ray and ultrasonographic examinations]

JENEI Mónika, VÁRKONYI Ildikó, NYITRAI Anna, SZABÓ Miklós, BOKODI Géza, KIS Éva

[INTRODUCTION - The authors’ purpose was to analyse the role of abdominal ultrasonography (US) in the diagnosis of necrotizing enterocolitis (NEC). They have compared the sensitivity of the current standard diagnostic modalities for this clinical entity: plain abdominal radiography and abdominal US. For a more objective comparison, they created an US scale along with utilising the score system based on abdominal radiography which was published recently. PATIENTS AND METHODS - 46 out of 76 neonates having both clinical and radiological diagnosis of NEC had comparable radiographic and sonographic examinations between June 2006 and October 2009. The authors created a 10-grade US score system, in which sonographic signs of NEC are listed in order of severity, corresponding, where possible with the radiographic scale that was available. The findings were scored individually, then the distribution of scores and their relationship to each other were analysed. For further analysis four groups of severity based on the scores were created with the following categories: mild, moderate, severe and very severe. After graphical representation of the groups, the relationship of the groups created on the basis of scoring the findings by the two diagnostic methods were examined. RESULTS - According to this analysis both abdominal radiographs and sonographs are suitable for diagnosing NEC, which has been justified with statistical data. When analysing the severity groups the authors proved that the two methods diverge in judging groups 3 and 4, thus severe and very severe. The distributions of severity groups formed by the two imaging modalities are different, (P<0,01); and the proportion of group 3 and group 4 is different in case of US and radiographic examinations (P=0.003). CONCLUSIONS - Abdominal sonography and radiography are equally suitable diagnostic methods for diagnosing NEC, and the two methods match each other very well. In cases of mild state, the severity of the disease was found to be the same with both methods, but US allows more sensitive differentiation of serious cases. It is very sensitive in detecting perforations, so it could play a role in determining the indication of surgery.]