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Hungarian Immunology

FEBRUARY 20, 2005

[Functional measurements of the hand’s circulation in Raynaud’s patients]

CSIKI Zoltán, GALUSKA László, GARAI Ildikó, SZABÓ Nóra, GALAJDA Zoltán, VARGA József, ZEHER Margit

[INTRODUCTION - In patients presenting with isolated tissue perfusion disturbance without large vessel involvement the examination of hand microcirculation is of major importance. In our study we present the results of three examination methods used for hand perfusion monitoring which measure the tissue microcirculation in different depths. PATIENTS AND METHODS - We examined 58 primary Raynaud's patients using capillary microscopy, laser doppler perfusion imaging and hand perfusion scintigraphy with Tc-99m-DTPA. From our patients 38 were smokers, 42 patients frequently suffered from headache. For the validation of our laser Doppler results we involved into the study also 16 non-smoker healthy volunteers. For the standardisation of the results the studies were performed in a climatised room. During the laser examination we performed and analysed also the post-occlusion hyperaemia test. RESULTS - In the majority of our patients no morphological alterations were found with capillary microscopy. In primary Raynaud’s patients the perfusion values measured with laser-Doppler scanner in basic condition were significantly lower both in fingers’ and palm’s regions compared to healthy controls. In the primary Raynaud’s group the smokers had significantly lower hyperaemic response than the non-smokers and we measured also significantly lower FPR (finger-to-palm ratio) values with hand perfusion scintigraphy. Both with laser doppler imaging and hand perfusion scintigraphy there was no difference between the values measured in patients with or without headache. CONCLUSIONS - We consider of benefit the functional examination of hand circulation in all diseases involving the hand microcirculation.]

Hungarian Radiology

OCTOBER 20, 2004

[Pelvic computed tomography in staging of prostate cancer before surgery]

BERCZI Csaba, TÓTH György, VARGA Attila, FLASKÓ Tibor, KOLLÁR József, TÓTH Csaba

[PURPOSE - The aim of the study was to measure the sensitivity and specificity of computed tomography for local staging in patients underwent radical perineal prostatectomy. PATIENTS AND METHODS - 160 patients were involved in the study. Rectal digital examination, measurement of prostate specific antigen, prostate biopsy, CT, ultrasound, chest X-ray examination and bone scintigraphy were performed in every case before radical prostatectomy. RESULTS - The average preoperative prostate specific antigen concentration was 15.8 ng/ml before surgery. The average Gleason score of biopsies was 3.19. CT showed extraprostatic infiltration in 14 patients (pericapsular invasion n: 6, seminal vesicula n: 3, bladder infiltration n: 5, lymph node metastasis n: 2). The histological examination proved extraprostatic invasion of the tumour in 35 cases (pericapsular invasion n: 35, seminal vesicula n: 25, bladder infiltration n: 5). The cancer was localized in the prostate in 125 patients. Sensitivity and specificity of CT for pericapsular invasion were 14% and 98%, for infiltration of seminal vesicula 12% and 100%, and for bladder infiltration 20% and 97%. There was not a significant difference between the prostate specific antigen values (p=0.94) in cases when the tumour was confined to the prostate and when the cancer showed extraprostatic infiltration. There was significant difference between the Gleason score values between the two groups (p=0.008). CONCLUSION - The sensitivity of CT for local spread of prostate cancer is very low, thus CT is not a suitable method for the local staging before surgery.]

Hungarian Radiology

APRIL 20, 2003

[Treatment of ureter stenosis of the transplanted kidney using invasive radiological methods]

DOROS Attila, WESZELITS Viola, PUHL Mária, RUSZ András, JANSEN Judit

[INTRODUCTION - Stenosis, occlusion and necrosis of the ureter after kidney transplantation occur in 2-13%. The therapeutic choices are surgery or minimally invasive endourological and percutaneous procedures. We analysed our therapeutic plan and results using percutaneous dilatation and stenting. PATIENTS AND METHODS - The patients after kidney transplantation are regularly examined by ultrasound. In cases of suspected obstruction we perform scintigraphy and CT-urography, and if indicated, we place percutaneous nephrostomy. Between July of 2000 and September of 2002, 15 stenosis in 14 patients were dilated and stented percutaneously. RESULTS - We found one restenosis after 6 months due to compression. This patient underwent surgery, but after the operation another stenosis has developed. We treated it percutaneously. One nephrectomy had to be performed due to serious infection. In one patient stent migration occured and surgical intervention was performed. 12 patients have free urine passage and good kidney function as a result of percutaneous therapy. CONCLUSION - We have good results with percutaneous ureter dilatation and stenting, but our follow-up time (31 months) must be longer for the evaluation of long-term results. The percutaneous treatment can partly replace endourological and surgical methods or can be combined with each other.]

Lege Artis Medicinae

MAY 20, 2005

[ISOTOPE BASED CARDIAC DIAGNOSTICS - POSSIBILITIES IN NUCLEAR CARDIOLOGY]

BALOGH Ildikó

[Methods of nuclear cardiology have been applied for several decades and there is continuous development in this area. The most commonly used modality is the myocardial perfusion scintigraphy (MPS). During stress MPS, the presence and the severity of ischaemic heart disease (IHD) can be detected. Resting MPS can show a freshly developing acut myocardial infarction (AMI) immediately, but new and old infarcted myocardial areas can not be distinguished by this method. Using SPECT (single photon emission tomography) examination and quantitative analysis can improve the accuracy of MPS. With gated SPECT we can analyse both the perfusion and the function of left ventricle. To examine the function of left and right ventricle the “gold standard” non-invasive method is MUGA (multiple gated acquisition) of blood pool scintigraphy. After only a few hours of the onset of AMI we can detect it with the socalled infarct avid scintigraphy using radiopharmaceuticals which accumulate in affected area. Following an AMI it is essential to differentiate among high and low risk patients for revascularisation treatment, therefore distinguishing the viable (hibernating) and non-viable (necrotic) myocardium with imaging techniques is an important task. Preserved metabolism as the sign of viable myocardium can be detected both by SPECT (most accurately by thallium rest-redistribution scintigraphy) and PET (detecting glucose metabolism by F-18-FDG). Adrenerg receptor scintigraphy can show the sympathetic innervation: in the case of a transplanted heart it can detect the reinnervation and in the case of malignant ventricular tachyarrhythmias the risks and the severity of the illness.]

Hungarian Immunology

JANUARY 20, 2003

[Hand perfusion scintigraphy in primary and secondary Raynaud's syndrome]

GARAI Ildikó, GALUSKA László, VARGA József, SZŰCS Gabriella, CSIKI Zoltán

[INTRODUCTION - The aim of the study was to investigate the circulatory characteristics of primary and secondary Raynaud’s syndrome patients using the hand perfusion scintigraphic method developed by the Nuclear Medicine Department of the DUMHC. PATIENTS AND METHODS - The authors examined 84 patients presenting classical symptoms of the disease: episodic ischemia with three-phase color change of the fingers. After visual evaluation theyanalyzed the obtained images quantitatively, using of the finger/palm ratio. Statistical analysis comparisons were made between the clinically separated primary and the secondary Raynaud's group. RESULTS - With the visual evaluation regional perfusion disturbances were frequently found in the secondary group - 37 from 51 patients - while only 2 from 33 patients in the primery group; the difference was statistically significant (p<0,001). The results of the quantitative analysis showed that the finger/palm ratio (FPR) values were significantly lower (p<0.05) in primary Raynaud’s group. In the FPR values there were not any differences between genders or the fingers of the right and left hands. CONCLUSIONS - The hand perfusion scintigraphy applying Tc-99m-DTPA is a noninvasive, cost effective diagnostic tool, which reflects objectively the global and regional microcirculatory abnormalities of the hands, and offers quantitative data for the follow-up.]

Lege Artis Medicinae

JANUARY 20, 2005

[POST-CHOLECYSTECTOMY SYNDROME AND SPHINCTER OF ODDI DYSFUNCTION]

MADÁCSY László

[After cholecystectomy, recurrent biliary-like pain, alone or in association with a transient increase in liver enzymes may be the clinical manifestation of the sphincter of Oddi dysfunction (SOD). Most of the clinical information concerning SOD refers to postcholecystectomy patients who have been classified according to clinical presentation, laboratory results and endoscopic retrograde cholangio-pancreatography (ERCP) findings as: biliary type I, biliary type II, and biliary type III. The prevalence of SOD has been reported to vary from 9 to 11% in unselected patients having postcholecystectomy syndrome up to 68% in a selected group of patients without organic disorder and complaining of postcholecystectomy pain. Diagnostic work-up of postcholecystectomy patients for suspected SOD includes liver biochemistry and pancreatic enzyme levels plus negative findings of structural abnormalities. Usually this would include transabdominal ultrasound, gastroscopy and ERCP. Depending on the available resources, endoscopic ultrasound and magnetic resonance cholangiography may precede endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography in specific clinical conditions. In SOD patients, the endoscopic sphincter of Oddi manometry is the gold-standard diagnostic method to evaluate the abnormal motor function of the sphincter of Oddi. Quantitative evaluation of bile transit with cholescintigraphy is valuable in the decision whether to perform sphincter of Oddi manometry or to treat. The standard treatment for SOD is sphincterotomy. In biliary type I patients, the indication for endoscopic sphincterotomy is straightforward without the need of additional investigations. Slow bile transit on cholescintigraphy in biliary type II patients is an indication to perform endoscopic sphincterotomy without sphincter of Oddi manometry. Positive Nardi or Debray evocative test in biliary type III patients is an indication to perform sphincter of Oddi manometry. Medical therapy with nitrosovasodilatators, Ca-channel blockers, theophyllin compounds, β2 receptor agonists and anticholinerg drugs can be useful in biliary type II and type III patients preceding endoscopic sphincterotomy. If medical therapy fails, one might proceed to perform ERCP and endoscopic sphincterotomy but only in patients with abnormal SO manometry results.]

Lege Artis Medicinae

FEBRUARY 20, 2009

[Asymptomatic hepatic giant haemangioma]

KOVÁCS GÁBOR, NYIKOS Orsolya, GERVAIN Judit

[INTRODUCTION - Haemangioma is the most common type of benign hepatic tumors. Haemangiomas are usually asymptomatic, except for those that exceed five centimeters in size and are called “giant” haemangiomas. Malignant transformation has not been noted and therefore only regular follow-up is recommended for smaller haemangiomas. Surgical intervention becomes necessary only if symptoms or complications occur. Nevertheless, atypical presentation can cause a significant differential diagnostic problem. CASE REPORT - The authors report the case of a 51-year old woman with a focal hepatic abnormality diagnosed during a routine abdominal ultrasound examination. Results of the subsequent computed tomography scan suggested a multiple hepatocellular carcinoma based on the morphological appearance. Following oncology consultation, she was admitted to our department for liver biopsy. Histology did not reveal any malignancy. This result together with the lack of symptoms and complaints and the normal laboratory test results shifted the likely diagnosis towards a benign haemangioma. Blood-pool scintigraphy confirmed this diagnosis. CONCLUSIONS - Haemangiomas are benign hepatic tumors. They are often diagnosed accidentally, by routine abdominal ultrasound examination. If an abdominal ultrasound raises suspicion of haemangioma, abdominal MRI scan or blood-pool scintigraphy is recommended to be performed in order to exclude malignancy for lesion sizes of <2 cm or >2 cm, respectively. The reported case is considered important because of the differential diagnostic problems the large size and the atypical presentation of the given haemangioma imposed. Ultrasound-guided liver biopsy via fine-needle aspiration has previously been contraindicated. This invasive procedure can be performed in patients with focal hepatic pathology if diagnosis cannot be established by non-invasive tests, especially if malignancy is suspected. It can be performed conditional on the localization of the tumor, the patient’s general condition, the laboratory results, and if there is a therapeutic consequence of the biopsy results.]

Lege Artis Medicinae

JANUARY 20, 2005

[CARCINOID TUMORS]

RÁCZ Károly

[Carcinoid tumors are rare neoplasms: they are traditionally divided into three subgroups (foregut, midgut and hindgut tumors). Despite their neuroendocrine cell origin and the similarities in their histological structure, the molecular background, pathogenesis, clinical features, diagnostic and therapeutic procedures, as well as the prognosis of carcinoid tumors located at different sites may be highly variable. Although sensitive biochemical markers (serum chromogranin A concentration, urinary 5- hydroxyindoleacetic acid excretion) and localization methods (somatostatin receptor scintigraphy, positron emission tomography) are available, a considerable number of patients are only diagnosed at the late stages of the disease. When surgical cure is not obtainable such as in cases with advanced metastatic disease, surgical procedures to reduce tumoral tissue should be still considered. At present, the most effective drugs for the symptomatic treatment of carcinoid tumors are somatostatin analogues (octreotide, lanreotide). In addition to their beneficial effect on clinical symptoms they may stabilize tumor growth for many years and rarely, tumor regression is produced. Radioisotope-labelled somatostatin analogues are presently under clinical evaluation, which may offer new therapeutic means for patients with carcinoid tumors.]

Hungarian Radiology

JUNE 10, 2005

[Comparison of the results of lung helical CT and lung scintigraphy in pulmonary embolism]

WENINGER Csaba, BODROGI Gabriella, BOROS Szilvia, SCHMIDT Erzsébet, UDVAROS Eszter, ZÁMBÓ Katalin

[INTRODUCTION - The frequency of the pulmonary embolism is high and the underdiagnosis or delayed recognition of the disease occurs. Recently the helical CT is used to detect pulmonary embolism. The authors compare the results of single-slice spiral thoracic CT and lung scan. PATIENTS AND METHODS - During one year period chest CT examination was performed in 49 patients due to the suspicion of pulmonary embolism, in 30 of them lung scan was also performed. RESULTS - The results of the two diagnostic methods were the same in 21 cases out 30 (in 13/21 cases both methods demonstrated embolism and 8/21 cases the findings were normal). In the remaining nine cases the findings were different. CONCLUSIONS - The lung CT examination is a rapid, non-invasive method to depict the central pulmonary embolism and small infarcts in non fresh cases. The negative result of perfusion lung scan can exclude the pulmonary embolism. If the lung scan demonstrates perfusion defect(s), it is necessary to perform another diagnostic tests (e.g. chest X-ray, ventillation scan). While the lung scan is a cheap, simple method with low radiation dose, it can play important role in the screening.]