Search results

Clinical Oncology

APRIL 10, 2019

[Metals and cancer]

VETLÉNYI Enikő, RÁCZ Gergely

[We often tend to forget about our environment when looking for the origin of a disease. Inhaled air, drinking water and food, substances in contact with the skin all have an effect on the human body. Metals are indispensable parts of our everyday lives, their mining, processing and use cause a continuous exposure to them. Metal exert their effects on the body in various ways. Many of them are essential for maintaining homeostasis, but excessive or harmful metal intake can lead to health damage, including tumour formation through multiple attack points. Metals substitute each other during different transport processes and in the structure of proteins, they cause oxidative stress and bind to DNA, thereby damaging it. Applying them appropriately, the proapoptotic effect of the metal compounds is brought to the fore, thus becoming a therapeutic tool for tumours. Nowadays, platinum(II) compounds are widely used as chemotherapeutic agents and there are many ongoing studies to fi nd metal compounds with an ideal therapeutic and side-effect profi le. The aims of this article were to draw the attention to the dangers of metals in relation to cancer and to highlight their diverse application possibilities in current and future cancer therapy and diagnostics.]

Clinical Neuroscience

SEPTEMBER 30, 2020

[Pompe disease treated with enzyme replacement therapy in pregnancy]

GROSZ Zoltán, VÁRDI Visy Katalin, MOLNÁR Mária Judit

[Pompe disease is a rare lysosomal storage disease inherited in a recessive manner resulting muscular dystrophy. Due to the lack of the enzyme alpha glucosidase, glycogen accumulates in the cells. In the infantile form of Pompe disease hypotonia and severe cardio-respiratory failure are common leading to death within 2 years if left untreated, while the late-onset form is characterized with limb-girdle and axial muscle weakness accompanied with respiratory dysfunction. Pompe disease has been treated with regular intake of the missing enzyme since 2006, which significantly improved the survival and severity of symptoms in patients of both subtypes. The enzyme replacement therapy (ERT) is safe and well tolerated. However, limited data are available on its use in pregnancy. Our goal is to share our experience and review the literature on the safety of enzyme replacement therapy for Pompe disease during pregnancy and post partum.]

Hypertension and nephrology

APRIL 24, 2020

[Possibilities and limitations. Dietary difficulties of chronic renal failure in childhood]

REUSZ György, SZABÓ Adrienn

[In chronic kidney disease (CKD), the role of the kidney in assuring homeostasis is gradually deteriorating. Besides fluid, electrolyte and hormonal disturbances, detoxification and control of blood pressure is insufficient without external help. In children, in addition to achieving equilibrium it is also essential to ensure optimal physical and cognitive/psychological development. Adequate calorie intake is a major determinant of growth during infancy. Among the therapeutic options it is essential to ensure a proper diet. In addition to reflecting the special needs of renal failure in its composition, it must be palatable for the child. Children with kidney disease should have a normal energy diet. Protein intake should not be reduced from the baseline recommendation, but lower phosphorus and high bioavailability should be preferred. A low sodium and potassium diet is recommended for a significant proportion of patients and is based on dietary advice. Further, diet planning may be problematic if the child has special dietary requirements and is in need of nasogastric tube feeding. Because diet planning is a complex task, it is difficult to achieve optimal protein supply and mineral restriction along with high energy intake. In such cases, enteral nutrition with special formulas/ drinks developed for pediatric nutrition may provide a solution.]

Clinical Neuroscience

SEPTEMBER 30, 2019

Acute bilateral drop foot as a complication of prolonged squatting due to haemorrhoid

KOKSAL Ayhan, DOGAN Burcu Vasfiye

Drop foot is defined as difficulty of dorsiflexion of the foot and ankle due to weak anterior tibial, extensor hallucis longus and extensor digitorum longus muscles. Cauda equina syndrome, local peroneal nerve damage due to trauma, nerve entrapment, compartment syndrome and tumors are common etiologies. A 32-year-old male patient was applied with difficulty in dorsiflexion of both of his toes, feet and ankles after he had squatted in toilette for 6-7 hours (because of his haemorrhoid) after intense alcohol intake 2 weeks before. Acute, partial, demyelinating lesion in head of fibula segment of peroneal nerves was diagnosed by electromyography. This case was reported since prolonged squatting is an extremely rare cause of acute bilateral peroneal neuropathy. This type of neuropathy is mostly demyelination and has good prognosis with physical therapy and mechanical devices, but surgical intervention may be required due to axonal damage. People such as workers and farmers working in the squatting position for long hours should be advised to change their position as soon as the compression symptoms (numbness, tingling) appear.

Lege Artis Medicinae

DECEMBER 10, 2018

[Experimental investigation of the complex energy balance]

GARAMI András

[The complex energy balance includes maintenance of both normal body mass and body temperature. In the homeostasis regulation it is important that the activities of several physiologic processes are balanced with each other, for example, the balance between food intake and energy expenditure is crucial to maintain normal body mass, while the balance between heat production and heat loss is vital in determining body temperature. Obesity and loss of body weight, as well as fever and hypothermia are consequences of the dysregulation in energy balance. In our research, we studied receptorial and neurohumoral mechanisms involved in the maintenance and in the impairment of energy balance. This paper gives an overview of our most important findings, which served as the basis of the application submitted to and awarded with 3rd prize by the Prof. Dr. Laszlo Romics Memorial Foundation. We review the physiologic role of transient receptor potential channels, mostly of vanilloid-1 (formerly: capsaicin receptor) in the regulation of body temperature and body mass. Among the neuropeptides which take part in the maintenance of energy balance, we present the thermoregulatory effects of alpha-melanocyte stimulating hormone and pituitary adenylate cyclase-activating polypeptide. Last, among the molecular mechanisms of systemic inflammation, which is characterized by thermoregulation disorders (e.g., fever, hypothermia), we recap the role of the vanilloid-1 and neurokinin-1 receptor, and bilirubin.]

Lege Artis Medicinae

SEPTEMBER 20, 2018

[Feeding and eating in infancy and early childhood part III. - Development of self-feeding skills in the large-sample of the “For Healthy Offspring” project ]

NÉMETH Tünde, VÁRADY Erzsébet, DANIS Ildikó, SCHEURING Noémi, SZABÓ László

[Feeding and eating in infancy and early childhood part III. - Development of self-feeding skills in the large-sample of the “For Healthy Offspring” project INTRODUCTION - After introducing adequate complementary food to the diet of breastfed/formula-fed babies, the frequency and amount of semisolid/solid food is increasing, the breastmilk/formula intake is decreasing and finally the weaning process is completed. During this process the developing feeding skills of the infant enables them to self-feed. The self-feeding infant and toddler should participate in family meals. SUBJECTS AND METHODS - In the Healthy Offspring project self reported questionnaires were received from 1133 parents of 0-3 year old children. Issues concerning the development of self-feeding skills were analyzed. RESULTS - With advancing age the proportion of infants/toddlers, reported to be able to (partially) self-feed, has increased. The age, at which the majority of toddlers (83.1%) were reported to self-feed, was at 13-15 months. By the age over 2 years 57.2% of the toddlers were fully self-feeding, 39.3% were self-feeding with some assistance, and 3.5% were still completely fed by their mother/caregiver. While self-feeding became more prevalent, the proportion of toddlers with feeding problems and insufficient weight gain has increased. With more prevalent complementary feeding more parents assessed their feeding style rather scheduled than on demand. In the whole sample the proportion of infants/toddlers, who ate with the family, was 43.8%. CONCLUSIONS - In our sample, as previously described in the scientific literature, the developmental readiness to self-feed has developed in the majority of infants by the age of 13-15 months. During progres­sion of weaning an increasing proportion of parents thought, that feeding was rather scheduled than on demand. This finding points at the importance of educating parents about the importance of responsive feeding during and after weaning. For self-feeding toddlers, responsive feeding means, that the mother/caregiver offers a choice of healthy and adequate amount of food, at a proper place, at proper times, responds to the hunger and satiety cues of the child and the toddler decides, whether to eat, what and how much to eat.]

Lege Artis Medicinae

SEPTEMBER 20, 2018

[Differential diagnosis and treatment of hyponatraemia]

NÉMETH Zsófia, DEÁK György

[Hyponatraemia (serum sodium concentration < 136 mmol/l) is the most frequent electrolyte abnormality that inceases the risk of both in-hospital, and outpatient mortality. Antidiuretic hormone action or low glomerular fitration rate or low excretable osmoles or their combination are involved in its pathogenesis. Differential diagnosis is based on medical and medication histories, serum- and urine osmolality and urine sodium concentration. Measurement of fractional excretions of urea and uric acid help identifying low effective circulting volume, renal hypoperfusion. Symptomatic hyponatraemia or an acute decrease of serum sodium concentration exceeding 10 mmol/l should be treated with 3% NaCl to avoid impending threat to life. The principles of the treatment of chronic hyponatraemia are restriction of water intake and elimination of etiologic factor(s) (eg. medications - most often thiazides). In case of contracted axtracellular volume, isotonic saline should be given. In case of euvolaemia, restriciton of water intake is fundamental. In case of expanded extracellular volume, (heart failure, liver cirrhosis, nephrosis), water and NaCl intake should be restricted along with aldosteron antagonist and loop diuretic therapy. In chronic hyponatraemia, the rise of serum sodium concentration should not exceed 10 mmol/l during the first 24 hours and 8 mmol/l/day thereafter. ]

Hypertension and nephrology

SEPTEMBER 14, 2018

[Role of ketoanalogue amino acids and diet in the treatment of patients with chronic kidney disease]

KISS István, HARIS Ágnes, DEÁK György

[Low protein diet is an important component of the non-pharmacological treatment of patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD). Along with the diet it is important to maintain appropriate energy intake to avoid malnutrition. It is recommended to supplement low protein diet (0.6-0.7 g protein/kg body weight/day) with essential amino acids and their ketoanalogues (ketoacids) in a dose of 1 tablet/8-10 kg body weight if there is a threat of protein malnutrition (eg. vegan diet). Very low protein diet (0.3-0.4 g protein/kg body weight/day) should be supplemented with ketoacids in a dose of 1 tablet/5 kg body weight. Low protein diet is recommended for patients with CKD stage 3 and progressively declining renal function, or nephrotic syndrome; in diabetic nephropathy; in CKD stage 4 and non-dialyzed CKD stage 5. Nephroprotective effect of very low protein diet is primarily expected is patients with an eGFR below 20-25 ml/min/1.73 m2 and good compliance. Dietary protein restriction may diminish acidosis and proteinuria, slow the progression of CKD and delay initiation of dialysis. Diets reduced in protein supplemented with appropriate energy intake and ketoacids are nutritionally safe. Dietary education and guidance of patients by qualified dietitians are of great importance in nephrology clinics. We illustrate the main points of our review with case reports.]

Hypertension and nephrology

APRIL 20, 2018

[Dietary treatment of dialysis patients]

ZAKAR Gábor

[Adequate nutritional indices and intake are the corner stone of long term success of renal replecement therapies (hemo- and peritoneal dialysis, transplantation) characterized by favourable survial rates and a good quality of life. There has been no major change in basic principles of nutritional prescription (protein, energy, fluid intake, restriction of sodium, potassium and phosphorous), increasing emphasis has been placed on the reduction of calcium load and ”native” vitamin-D therapy in these patients. Less avareness has been put however in the past ten years (according to recent metaanalyses) on the role and replacement of the full scale of vitamins, in spite of their occasionally altered metabolism and replacement-requirements in ESRD patients. Usually there is a need for their replacement, but some of them are represented in abundant, sometimes toxic amounts in commercially available multivitamin preparates. With in the scope of general aspects of nutrition in ESRD patients, the article gives a detalied overview of their multivitamin recommendations and alternatives of a specified substition.]

Hypertension and nephrology

MAY 20, 2017

[New agents in the therapy of hyperkalaemia]

PATÓ Éva, DEÁK György

[Serum potassium level higher than 5,5 mmol/l denotes hyperkalemia that becomes severe above 7,5 mmol/l being a potentially life threatening condition due to ventricular arrythmias. It may develop as a consequence of high potassium intake, decreased renal excretion, and extracellular potassium shift. Its treatment is a challenge even nowadays especially in the setting of chronic kidney disease, diabetes mellitus, and heart failure where RAAS inhibion is an essential component of the therapy. Sodium polystyrene sulfonate, an ion exchange resin is applied for more than fifty years. Recently new angents, patiromer and sodium zirconium cyclosylicate (ZS-9) were introduced and available results show a safer, more tolerable and predicatble effect. Efficiency of patiromer to reduce hyperkalemia is verified in clinical trials in patients with chronic kidney disease, or diabetes mellitus, or hypertension or heart failure on RAAS inhibitor therapy.]