Search results

LAM KID

MAY 30, 2013

[Modern medical and dietary treatment of gout in light of the new American guidelines]

SZEKANECZ Zoltán

[After several decades of “silence”, in the past few years a number of new data and treatment options have become available regarding the management of hyperuricaemy and gout. We also have a better understanding of the immunpathogenic processes of the disease, resulting in new medicines, as well as dietary and lifestyle modifications. Finally, in 2012, the American College of Rheumatology (ACR) has published new guidelines, which provide detailed algorhythms for each stage of gout and for special clinical situations. Although some aspects of clinical practice in Europe are different from that in the US, the new guidelines are applicable - with the necessary adaptations - in Hungary for the efficient treatment of gout and its comorbidities.]

Lege Artis Medicinae

APRIL 20, 2013

[Beyond the wrinkles: botulinum toxin for the treatment of focal dystonia]

KOVÁCS Tibor

[Botulinum toxin (BTX) is used in various fields including biological warfare as well as cosmetic applications. However, its ability to block neuromuscular transmission provides a unique option for the therapy of diseases associated with increased muscle tension. BTX is effective in both striated and smooth muscles, which makes it applicable for a number of clinical purposes beyond its cosmetic use. Clinical applications include treatment of focal dystonias, the most common form of which is spastic torticollis (cervical dystonia) and blepharospasm. As BTX therapy is a safe, efficient and first-line treatment option in focal dystonias, the recognition of these diseases and their differential diagnosis might be important in almost all clinical fields, especially in ophthalmology, psychiatry, orthopedic surgery and rheumatology. The aim of this review is to present BTX therapy as a treatment option for these diseases.]

LAM Extra for General Practicioners

FEBRUARY 20, 2012

[PAIN MANAGEMENT IN RHEUMATOLOGY]

NAGY Katalin

[Pain is the most common symptom in rheumatology, which can be of mechanical or inflammatory origin, acute and chronic, nociceptive, neuropathic and psychogenic. Pain can be relieved by analgesics, nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, opioids, adjuvants and special drugs depending on the etiology, for example a gout attack can be stopped by colchicine. For pain relief, we use therapeutic guidelines of the World Health Organization (WHO), which recommends the use of analgesics, NSAIDs and adjuvants as the first step, weaker opioids as the second, and strong opioids as the third step. In rheumatology, the first step's drugs are generally used. If possible, NSAIDs should be administered briefly, potentially combined with analgesics and muscle relaxants. If pain management is insufficient, tramadol should be given. Pain relief in rheumatology also include the use of local and intraarticular injections, physiotherapy, TENS and balneotherapy. Complex therapies that combine the above mentioned methods is often more effective than the use of medications only.]

LAM KID

OCTOBER 20, 2011

[Pain management in rheumatology]

NAGY Katalin

[Pain is the most common symptom in rheumatology, which can be of mechanical or inflammatory origin, acute and chronic, nociceptive, neuropathic and psychogenic. Pain can be relieved by analgesics, nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, opioids, adjuvants and special drugs depending on the etiology, for example a gout attack can be stopped by colchicine. For pain relief, we use therapeutic guidelines of the World Health Organization (WHO), which recommends the use of analgesics, NSAIDs and adjuvants as the first step, weaker opioids as the second, and strong opioids as the third step. In rheumatology, the first step's drugs are generally used. If possible, NSAIDs should be administered briefly, potentially combined with analgesics and muscle relaxants. If pain management is insufficient, tramadol should be given. Pain relief in rheumatology also include the use of local and intraarticular injections, physiotherapy, TENS and balneotherapy. Complex therapies that combine the above mentioned methods is often more effective than the use of medications only.]

LAM KID

OCTOBER 20, 2011

[Osteoporotic patient’s use of prescription drugs - pilot study]

BATKA Gábor, SZENTANDRÁSSY Andrea Éva, SZEKERES László

[BACKGROUND - In Hungary, the number of the highest mortality hip fractures is between 12 000-15 000 per year. The cost of treating hip fractures is several times higher than that of preventive medical therapy. Thus, the compliance of patients with osteoporosis is of great importance. METHODS - Using the informatical database of St. András Rheumatology Hospital at Héviz, we collected one year’s prescription drugs for osteoporosis and compared them with the number of drugs obtained by the patients, determined from National Health Insurance data. RESULTS - In general, the patients obtained 75% of prescription drugs. From the 4354 boxes of prescribed antiporotics, 3637 contained bisphosphonate (not considering vitamin D and calcium). Within this group, 88% of combination preparations were obtained, which is a greater ratio than that of non-combination bisphosphonates (84%). CONCLUSIONS - On the basis of our results, we posit that prescription of a combination preparation somewhat improves the patients’ compliance. The low concordance of vitamin D and calcium preparations is worrying.]

Hungarian Immunology

MARCH 20, 2007

[The importance of etanercept treatment in rheumatology]

GERGELY Péter, POÓR Gyula

[Rheumatoid arthritis, juvenile idiopathic arthritis, ankylosing spondylitis and psoriatic arthritis are inflammatory rheumatic conditions of unknown origin. Common characteristic features of these disorders include a relatively high prevalence, poorly understood pathogenesis and an unresolved treatment as well as a significant impact on mortality, morbidity and medical expenditures. The recognition of the central role of TNF-α in immune mediated inflammatory conditions, mainly in rheumatoid arthritis has led to the introduction of TNF-α blocking biological therapy into clinical rheumatology revolutionizing the management of these diseases. Etanercept is a human soluble TNF-α receptor attached to human IgG capable of effectively neutralizing TNF-α and lymphotoxin alpha. Since its introduction in 1998 as the first biological agent approved for RA, several clinical trials as well as everyday practice have proven its efficacy and safety. To date approximately 440 thousand patients, mostly with inflammatory rheumatic diseases have been treated with etanercept. In the present paper the pathophysiological role of TNF-α, the results of clinical trials of etanercept and its cost-effectivenes as well as issues regarding the use of etanercept in Hungary are reviewed.]

LAM Extra for General Practicioners

OCTOBER 25, 2010

[PAIN AND PAIN CONTROL IN RHEUMATOLOGY]

GAÁL János

[In developed industrial countries the overall population prevalence of chronic rheumatic pain is around 35%. A classification that is useful in everyday practice is based on the origin of musculoskeletal pain and lists pain associated with degenerative joint diseases, pain related to metabolic bone diseases, non-articular and soft tissue rheumatism, and pain due to inflammation. In chronic pain syndrome pain itself has lost its adaptive biological role, and presents as a pathogenetic factor in its own right, accompanied by significant vegetative and psychological symptoms. Therapeutic exercise is of basic importance in the management of rheumatic pain. It is supplemented by various pharmacologic and nonpharmacologic methods. The latter include, among others, fomentations, packs, balneo- and hydrotherapeutic methods, electro-, mechanoand thermotherapeutic approaches. Pharmacological therapy usually means the use of simple analgesics, non-steroidal antiinflammatory drugs, steroids, minor opiates, and, lately, also major opiates, which may be supplemented by adjuvant agents such as tricyclic antidepressants and anticonvulsive drugs. When indicating the most often used non-steroidal antiinflammatory drugs, their potential side effects should carefully be considered. Invasive pain-killing methods on the border area between anaesthesiology and rheumatology (epidural steroid administration, ganglionic blockade, intravenous regional blockade) are applied in cases that do not respond to conventional therapy, and sometimes also as successful first-line intervention.]

Hungarian Immunology

MARCH 20, 2006

[Paraneoplastic diseases of the locomotor system]

ANDRÁS Csilla, SZÁNTÓ János, SZEKANECZ Zoltán, CSIKI Zoltán, ILLÉS Árpád, SZEKANECZ Éva, DANKÓ Katalin

[Paraneoplasias in rheumatology can be present in different forms of arthropathies, myopathies. In addition, we often see atypical forms of systemic autoimmune diseases. Vasculitis is mainly associated with lymphoproliferative diseases. The direct invasion of bones and joints is not present in paraneoplasia, as this entity is a collection of symptoms generated by the tumour itself by producing biologic mediators, hormones, peptides, antibodies, cytotoxic lymphocytes, autocrine and paracrine mediators. Recognition of paraneoplasia is of outmost importance because it attires attention to the presence of tumour in the organism and thus enables us for early treatment of the malignancy. Monitoring of the severity of paraneoplastic symptoms serves as a marker for determination of efficacy of the targeted oncological therapy. On the other side, because these severe symptoms affect the patient's quality of life and can lead even to death their in time recognition and treatment is extremely important.]