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Lege Artis Medicinae

SEPTEMBER 30, 2020

[The pain-trigger role of cytokines in the nervous system – the direct analgesic effect of anti-cytokine therapy ]

HODINKA László, VERECKEI Edit

[Nociceptive, neuropathic and central me­chanisms are involved in the perception, transmission and processing of chronic pain and shaping of cerebral pain image. Alar­mins – molecules alarming defence and signing the presence of pathogens and tissue damage - trigger a series of pathogenic events resulting in inflammatory pain stimuli. Proinflammatory cytokines play a determining role in the pain perception at the level of the nervous system. Continuous inflammatory stimuli while sensitizing the periferic and central neurons activate the pain-related cerebral areas and develop the complex pain image, the pain matrix. Ce­reb­ral functional connections are operating in networks and can be visualized by functional MRI. Cytokines activate the neurons directly or indirectly by other neuromediators. Cytokine receptors are expressed on no­ciceptors and even on higher-level neurons and on various non-neural cells, such as microglia and astrocytes. The most ubiquitous cytokines are the Tumour Necrosis Factor and Interleukin 6 in the nervous sys­tem. The signaling pathways are the Nuclear Factor κB and the Janus-kinase enzyme system. The proinflammatory cytokines and the Janus-kinase are therefore primary therapeutic targets. Anti-cytokine biologicals and small molecular kinase inhibitors decrease the pain and improve functional activity in rheumatoid arthritis. Decrease of pain was more pronounced than expected only from the decrease of the clinical biomarkers of inflammation. The early and ra­pid painkiller effect of targeted biological and chemical-biological response modifiers is attributed to their direct analgesic effect on the brain.]

Lege Artis Medicinae

OCTOBER 20, 2018

[Juvenile idiopathic arthritis: from diagnosis to treatment]

MOSDÓSI Bernadett

[Juvenile idiopathic arthritis is a heterogeneous group of diseases that is one of the most common chronic diseases of childhood. It begins before 16 years of age, the etiology is unknown, it is persisting for at least 6 weeks and other pathologic conditions could be excluded. Juvenile idiopathic arthritis includes several diseases categories, each of them have distinct methods of presentation, clinical symptoms, pathogenesis and treatment options. Recent advances in the understanding of the immunological pathogenesis of the diseases have led to dramatic improvements in treatment. Although the management is using a multidisciplinary approach, the disease often persist into adulthood and can cause significant long-term morbidity and physical disability. Our article discusses the classification, clinical manifestations, differential diagnosis, treatment and complications of juvenile idiopathic arthritis. ]

Clinical Neuroscience

NOVEMBER 30, 2017

Nerve conduction study and gastrocnemius H reflex response in rheumatoid arthritis

EMRE Ufuk, ORTANCIL Özgül, UNAL Aysun, KIRAN Sibel, SAPMAZ Perihan, ATASOY Tugrul

Objectives - We aimed to evaluate nerve conduction studies and gastrocnemius H reflex responses in rheumatoid arthritis (RA) patients and compared to the healthy adult subjects. Materials and methods - Twenty-six RA patients and twenty-two healthy adult subjects were included in the study. The nerve conduction study (NCS) findings and bilateral gastrocnemius H reflex responses were evaluated in all the groups. Age, gender, subcutaneous nodules, joint deformities, laboratory parameters, duration of disease, anti-rheumatic drug and steroid usage were recorded. Activity of disease was assessed using a 28-joint disease activity score (DAS28).The functional status was measured using the health assessment questionnaire (HAQ), pain intensity measured using a visual analog scale (VAS). Results - The rate of electroneuromyographic (ENMG) abnormalities was 73% in RA patients. The most common diagnosis was carpal tunnel syndrome (61.4%). There were no significant correlations between ENMG findings and clinical and laboratory features evaluated. Right H reflex latencies were statistically longer in RA patients (p=0.03). According to calculated cut-off levels, there were more subjects with longer H reflex latencies in RA patients. Conclusions - In this study, entrapment neuropathies were found common as independent identity from duration and severity of disease in RA patients. For H reflex latencies, cut-off values were longer in RA patients. It may provide information about the early neuropathic involvement of long peripheral nerves in RA patients. But this findings are needed to be supported by larger population study.

Lege Artis Medicinae

OCTOBER 20, 2016

[Crystal deposition in the background of a thyroid nodule]

BÉLY Miklós, PÉTER Ilona, SZŐKE János, GÁTI Tamás, KOLTAI Pál

[The authors present the findings of thyroid surgery in a patient treated for rheumatoid arthritis. An operation was performed due to the rapidly enlarged thyroid. In addition to the complex developmental anomaly, different crystals were found in the surgical material, which had called attention to the possibly affected mineral metabolism. Actually/Currently, the patient is not suffering from a clinically detectable metabolic disease or arthropathia induced by any crystal. The definitive crystal deposition in tissues, however, calls the physicians attention that the patient in addition to the treatment of the underlying disease should be examined in direction of a possibly developing metabolic disease, and, if necessary, an effective therapy should be used in a very early phase. ]

LAM Extra for General Practicioners

JUNE 10, 2014

[Recognition of the characteristics of rare types of arthritis]

ROJKOVICH Bernadette, MÉSZÁROS Györgyi

[Recognition of the characteristics of arthritis is crucial for making a correct diagnosis. Several aspects of the history and physical examination could help the diagnosis, such as the mode of onset (acute, insidious), duration of symptoms (self-limiting, chronic), number of affected joints (mono-, oligo-, polyarthritis), distribution of joint involvement (symmetrical, asymmetrical), localisation of affected joints (axial, peripherial) and sequence of involvement (additive, migratory, intermittent). Other important aspects for the correct diagnosis are the characteristics of the patient (gender, age, family history) and the presence or absence of extra-articular features of disease. The articular pattern may change with time in the course of a disease, and the single clinical pattern of joint disease may correspond to more than one diagnosis. Evidence of some distinct articular patterns may limit the spectrum of diagnostic options and reduces unnecessary diagnostic testing. The diagnostic process may require the addition of laboratory examination, imaging techniques, and other tests to refine the analysis. In this article, we report a case where joint punction and histological elucidation was necessary to make the correct diagnosis, because a syndrome of acute, destructive sterile arthritis mimicking articular infection might be present in a variety of joint disorders. In this paper, we highlight those characteristics that are distinctive for particular rheumatological disorders, in order to help starting treatment early.. In a substantial number of patients the cause of the diseases remains undetermined. However, a detailed anamnesis and physical examination remain the cornerstone of a diagnostic evaluation. ]

Lege Artis Medicinae

JUNE 20, 2014

[The effect of biological therapy on generalised osteoporosis in patients with rheumatoid arthritis]

JUHÁSZ Péter

[In rheumatoid arthritis, the inflammation and damage of multiple joints can lead to generalised osteoporosis. This process is mostly mediaated by cells and cytokines that are also important for maintaining inflammation, by inhibiting bone formation as well as stimulating bone resorption. Data from the literature show that biological therapies that effectively decrease inflammation can also stimulate bone formation and inhibit bone resorption. This results in an increased bone density and bone protection, which is highly important to prevent subseqent fractures.]

LAM KID

MAY 30, 2014

[The effect of biological therapy on generalised osteoporosis in patients with rheumatoid arthritis]

JUHÁSZ Péter

[In rheumatoid arthritis, the inflammation and damage of multiple joints can lead to generalised osteoporosis. This process is mostly mediaated by cells and cytokines that are also important for maintaining inflammation, by inhibiting bone formation as well as stimulating bone resorption. Data from the literature show that biological therapies that effectively decrease inflammation can also stimulate bone formation and inhibit bone resorption. This results in an increased bone density and bone protection, which is highly important to prevent subseqent fractures.]

LAM KID

MAY 30, 2014

[Recognition of the characteristics of rare types of arthritis]

ROJKOVICH Bernadette, MÉSZÁROS Györgyi

[Recognition of the characteristics of arthritis is crucial for making a correct diagnosis. Several aspects of the history and physical examination could help the diagnosis, such as the mode of onset (acute, insidious), duration of symptoms (self-limiting, chronic), number of affected joints (mono-, oligo-, polyarthritis), distribution of joint involvement (symmetrical, asymmetrical), localisation of affected joints (axial, peripherial) and sequence of involvement (additive, migratory, intermittent). Other important aspects for the correct diagnosis are the characteristics of the patient (gender, age, family history) and the presence or absence of extra-articular features of disease. The articular pattern may change with time in the course of a disease, and the single clinical pattern of joint disease may correspond to more than one diagnosis. Evidence of some distinct articular patterns may limit the spectrum of diagnostic options and reduces unnecessary diagnostic testing. The diagnostic process may require the addition of laboratory examination, imaging techniques, and other tests to refine the analysis. In this article, we report a case where joint punction and histological elucidation was necessary to make the correct diagnosis, because a syndrome of acute, destructive sterile arthritis mimicking articular infection might be present in a variety of joint disorders. In this paper, we highlight those characteristics that are distinctive for particular rheumatological disorders, in order to help starting treatment early.. In a substantial number of patients the cause of the diseases remains undetermined. However, a detailed anamnesis and physical examination remain the cornerstone of a diagnostic evaluation.]

Lege Artis Medicinae

NOVEMBER 20, 2013

[Therapeutic strategies in rheumatoid arthritis]

VÁNCSA Andrea, SZEKANECZ Zoltán

[In this review, we follow the consecutive steps of the internationally accepted therapeutic strategy of rheumatoid arthritis (RA). We summarise in brief the current European recommendations, and provide some advice on methotrexate (MTX) therapy. The initiation, maintenance and, if needed, switch of biological therapy is also discussed. Having reached remission or low disease activity (LDA), tapering or discontinuation of biologics may be considered. Finally, we review the possibilities and the most important biomarkers of personalised treatment.]

Hypertension and nephrology

OCTOBER 20, 2013

[Therapeutic apheresis in pediatry]

TÚRI Sándor, BERECKI Csaba, HASZON Ibolya, PAPP Ferenc

[The possible mechanisms of therapeutic plasma mexchange: 1. the removal of circulatory plasma factor (anti Gbm disease, myasthenia gravis, Guillain Barré syndrome), 2. monoclonal antibody (Waldenström macroglobulinemia, myeloma protein), 3. circulatory immuncomplexes cryoglobulinaemia, myeloma protein, SLE), 4. alloantibody, 5. toxic factor, 6. replacement of a specific plasma factor, 7. a repear of the function of reticulo-endothelial system, 8. the removal of the inflammatory mediators, 9. the changes of the ratio of antigen-antibody which makes immuncomplexes more soluble, 10 stimulation of lymphocyte clones for supporting the cytotoxic therapy. Indications of emergency plasmapheresis: 1. Goodpasture syndrome with rapidly progressive glomerulonephritis and hemoptoe, 2. hyperviscosity syndrome, 3. TTP/HUS, 4. High level of factor VIII inhibitor, 5. respiratory insufficiency Guillain-Barré syndrome, 6. myasthenia gravis, 7. acute mushroom intoxication, or protein bound toxins. Further indications for plasmapheresis: 8. cryoglobulinemia, 9. other cases of rapidly progressive glomerulonephritis (when steroid+ cyclophosphamide are ineffective), 10. Wegener granulomatosis, 11. polyarteritis nodosa, 12. systemic lupus erythematosus (when steroid and cyclophosphamid therapy is not effective or associated with cerebral vasculitis, antiphospholipid syndrome combined with bleeding and thrombosis), 13. focal segmental glomerulosclerosis (resistant for therapy), 14. acute tubulointerstitial nephritis, 15. acute vascular rejection, 16. rheumatoid arthritis systemic type, 17. hypertrigliceridemia (≥25 mM), 18. thyreotoxic crisis, 19. acute necrotizing pancreatitis, 20. acute fulminant hepatitis, 21. paraquat intoxication, 22. snake bite (when antiserum is unavailable), 23. drug intoxication.]