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Clinical Neuroscience

JANUARY 30, 2021

[The first Hungarian patient with Guillain-Barre syndrome after COVID-19]

NADIM Al-Muhanna, BÉRES-MOLNÁR Katalin Anna, JARECSNY Tamás, FOLYOVICS András

[Guillain-Barré syndrome (GBS) is a sporadic, relatively rare disease. In serious cases, it can lead to respiratory failure and death. The correlation between SARS-CoV-2 and the risk of GBS is not yet known. COVID-19-associated prolonged pulmonary complications could be worsened by the potential airway interference caused by GBS. The literature is inconsistent whether SARS-CoV-2 virus has direct or indirect effect on the onset of GBS. The authors describe the medical history of the first published GBS patient in Hungary with a preceding confirmed COVID-19 infection. The trigger role of COVID-19 infection is assumed because of the subsequent development of GBS after COVID-19 infection. So far none of the patients in the literature (including this patient) had positive PCR of SARS-CoV-2 virus from the cerebrospinal fluid.]

Clinical Neuroscience

JANUARY 30, 2021

Neuroscience highlights: The mirror inside our brain

KRABÓTH Zoltán, KÁLMÁN Bernadette

Over the second half of the 19th century, numerous theories arose concerning mechanisms involved in understanding of action, imitative learning, language development and theory of mind. These explorations gained new momentum with the discovery of the so called “mirror neurons”. Rizzolatti’s work inspired large groups of scientists seeking explanation in a new and hitherto unexplored area of how we perceive and understand the actions and intentions of others, how we learn through imitation to help our own survival, and what mechanisms have helped us to develop a unique human trait, language. Numerous studies have addressed these questions over the years, gathering information about mirror neurons themselves, their subtypes, the different brain areas involved in the mirror neuron system, their role in the above mentioned mechanisms, and the varying consequences of their dysfunction in human life. In this short review, we summarize the most important theories and discoveries that argue for the existence of the mirror neuron system, and its essential function in normal human life or some pathological conditions.

Clinical Oncology

APRIL 30, 2020

[Coronavirus pandemic – new challenges in oncotherapy]

MINÁROVITS János

[This review outlines some of the basic observations related to coronaviruses infecting animals and describes – in a nutshell – the characteristics of human coronaviruses causing mild or severe respiratory diseases in infected individuals. A special attention is given to SARS-CoV-2, the causative agent of the current coronavirus disease (Covid-19) pandemic, and to the pathomechanism of severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) which is also accompanied with multiorgan failure in a subset of infected patients. Recently discovered unique molecular features of SARS-CoV-2 are described as well. These molecular cues may affect human to human virus transmission whereas they are absent, remarkably, from the other lung-targeting highly pathogenic human coronaviruses (SARS-CoV-1 and MERS-CoV) which did not spread all over the world. The possibilities of active immunization to prevent SARS-CoV-2 infection and the development of selective small molecule inhibitors curbing the replication of the virus are also touched upon. The review closes with a few remarks regarding the Hungarian and international recommendations concerning the treatment of SARSCoV- 2 infected cancer patients.]

Clinical Oncology

APRIL 30, 2020

[Hormone replacement therapy in cancer survivors – Review of the literature]

DELI Tamás, OROSZ Mónika, JAKAB Attila

[Rapid advance in oncology leads to increasing survival of oncologic patients. More and more of them live long enough to reach either the natural age of menopause or, as a side effect of their oncotherapy, experience the cessation of gonadal function, leading to premature ovarian insuffi ciency, with disturbing vasomotor symtoms and long-term negative cardiovascular and skeletal effects. Thus, an ever increasing number of cancer survivors search endocrinologic help in the form of hormone replacement therapy (HRT). The misinterpretation of the WHI (Women’s Health Initiative) Study has lead to an irrational fear of female hormone replacement, both by the general population and medical professionals. It has seemed the logical and safe conclusion to many physicians to avoid HRT, supposing that this attitude defi nitely causes no harm, whereas the decision of prescribing estrogen alone or with progestins might bear oncologic and thromboembolic risks and may even lead to litigation in case of a potentially related complication. However, it was known even before the WHI results that premature menopause and hypogonadism decreases the life expectancy of women by years through its skeletal and cardiovascular effects, and this negative effect correlates with the length of the hypoestrogenaemic period. Yet, the oncologic risk of HRT is extremely diffi cult to assess. In this work we review the latest evidence from in vitro experiments to clinical studies. We group tumours regarding the oncologic risk of properly chosen female hormone replacement therapy in cancer survivors as follows: ’HRT is advanageous’ (e.g. endometrial cancer type I, cervical adenocarcinoma, haematologic malignancies, local cutaneous malignant melanoma, colorectal cancer, hepatocellular cancer); ’HRT is neutral’ (e.g. BRCA 1/2 mutation carriers without cancer, endometrial cancer type II, uterinal carcinosarcoma and adenosarcoma, certain types of ovarian cancer, cervical, vaginal and vulvar squamous cell carcinoma, prolactinoma, kidney cancer, pancreatic cancer, thyroid cancer); ’HRT is relatively contraindicated’ for various reasons (e.g. leiomyosarcoma, certain types of ovarian tumours, brain tumours, advanced metastatic malignant melanoma, lung cancer, gastric cancer, bladder cancer); ’HRT is diasadvantageous and thus contraindicated’ (e.g. breast cancer, endometrial stroma sarcoma, meningioma, glioma, hormone receptor positive gastric and bladder cancer).]

Hypertension and nephrology

NOVEMBER 04, 2020

[Wearing a face mask: effect on a doctor – patient relationship. Complicating factors and their compensations]

VONYIK Gabriella, FARKAS Martin, TURNER Andrea, FINTA Ervin, BORSZÉKI Judit

[Wearing face masks plays an important role to effectively decrease the chance of transmitting respiratory diseases. Face masks commonly worn during the Covid-19 pandemic to shield the mouth and the nose, cover about 60- 70% of the area of the face that is crucial for the effective verbal and nonverbal communication and perception of mental states. Face masks may complicate social interaction especially in the medical setting where communication skills and doctor-patient relationship are essential to primary care consultations. Literature was reviewed on the impact of such face masks on effective doctor and patient communication as well as useful alternative ways are suggested to compensate them in order to maintain the effective doctor-patient interaction.]

Clinical Neuroscience

SEPTEMBER 30, 2020

[Pompe disease treated with enzyme replacement therapy in pregnancy]

GROSZ Zoltán, VÁRDI Visy Katalin, MOLNÁR Mária Judit

[Pompe disease is a rare lysosomal storage disease inherited in a recessive manner resulting muscular dystrophy. Due to the lack of the enzyme alpha glucosidase, glycogen accumulates in the cells. In the infantile form of Pompe disease hypotonia and severe cardio-respiratory failure are common leading to death within 2 years if left untreated, while the late-onset form is characterized with limb-girdle and axial muscle weakness accompanied with respiratory dysfunction. Pompe disease has been treated with regular intake of the missing enzyme since 2006, which significantly improved the survival and severity of symptoms in patients of both subtypes. The enzyme replacement therapy (ERT) is safe and well tolerated. However, limited data are available on its use in pregnancy. Our goal is to share our experience and review the literature on the safety of enzyme replacement therapy for Pompe disease during pregnancy and post partum.]

Lege Artis Medicinae

SEPTEMBER 30, 2020

[Frequency and risk factors of “de novo” tumors after kidney transplantation ]

BORDA Bernadett, HÓDI Zoltán, SZEDERKÉNYI Edit, OTTLAKÁN Aurél, SEREGÉLY Edit, LÁZÁR György, KERESZTES Csilla, VIRÁG Katalin

[After kidney transplantation, the administration of immunosuppressive therapy not only renders the patient susceptible to infections, but it may also damage the function of tumor cell recognition and elimination. Our study was performed at the Department of Surgery, University of Szeged. After establishing the inclusion criteria, 570 patients were involved in the study. We examined the age, sex, immunosuppressive therapy of the patients, and searched for the rela­tionship between the different immunosuppressive agents and the type of the tumor. In 81 cases, de novo cancer was diagnosed. Among patients treated with cyclosporin and tacrolimus there was no significant difference in the mean age (p = 0.734) and body mass index (p = 0.543). There was no significant difference in graft function between the two groups of patients (Tac vs Cyc; 44 vs 20). Related to the time passed since the trans­plantation to diagnosing the tumors the earliest were prostate and cervix cancers however without significant difference. Skin cancers are the most frequent followed by post-transplant lym­pho­prolife­ra­tive diseases. The increasing risk of developing tumors is mainly due to immunosuppressive therapy. ]

Hypertension and nephrology

JUNE 24, 2020

[Treatment of hypertension in patients with chronic renal failure]

SZLOVÁK Edina, SZILVESZTER Dolgos

[The prevalence of chronic renal failure and hypertension is steadily increasing worldwide. The risk of possible cardiovascular death in patient with advanced renal failure is greater than the risk of progression to end-stage renal failure. Therefore treating and achieving target blood pressure is important in order to slow renal function decline in parallel with cardiovascular risk reduction. However, guidelines do not specify a single blood pressure target to be achieved in patients with renal failure, but suggest evidence based, reno- and cardioprotective therapy. This paper summarizes the clinical practice of treating hypertension (drug and nondrug treatment, therapeutic algorithm, target value, effectiveness of therapy) in patients with chronic renal failure.]

Clinical Neuroscience

JULY 30, 2020

[The complex intensive care and rehabilitation of a quadriplegic patient using a diaphragm pacemaker]

FODOR Gábor, GARTNER Béla, KECSKÉS Gabriella

[A 21 year female polytraumatized patient was admitted to our unit after a serious motorbike accident. We carried out CT imaging, which confirmed the fracture of the C-II vertebra and compression of spinal cord. Futhermore, the diagnostic investigations detected the compound and comminuted fracture of the left humerus and femur; the sacrum and the pubic bones were broken as well. After the stabilization of the cervical vertebra, a tracheotomy and the fixation of her limbs were performed. She spent 1.5 years in our unit. Meanwhile we tried to fix all the medical problems related to tetraplegia and respiratory insufficiency. As part of this process she underwent an electrophysiological examination in Uppsala (Sweden) and a diaphragm pacemaker was implanted. Our main goal was to reach the fully available quality of life. It is worth making this case familiar in a wider range of public as it could be an excellent example for the close collaboration of medical and non-medical fields.]