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Clinical Oncology

APRIL 30, 2020

[Biological clock and cancer]

VELLAINÉ Takács Krisztina, SZTANKOVICS Dániel, HOFFMANN Gyula, KOPPER László, GÁLOSI Rita

[In the present paper, we are giving a review about the circadian rhythm of the biological rhythm, its regulation and relation to tumorigenesis. The circadian rhythm is an approximately 24-hour cycle in biochemical, physiological processes in organisms from unicellular to vertebrates. This biological rhythm is generated by the synchronization of our endogenous clocks and the light as the main “Zeitgeber”. The nucleus suprachiasmaticus (SCN) of the hypothalamus is the region, which is considered to be the circadian “main clock” of the organism and is responsible for coordinating peripheral clocks in different organ systems. At the cellular level, the regulation of the circadian rhythm is basically provided by the so-called “circadian locomotor output cycles kaput” the CLOCK genes. The discovery of those cellular mechanisms was awarded with Nobel Prize in 2017. The CLOCK genes, acting on other effector genes, regulate diurnal rhythm of protein synthesis. More and more data are available, which suggest that there is an association between circadian genes and tumor development. Furthermore, many studies show a link between the shift work and the development of breast and prostate cancer and between mutations in some circadian genes and development of carcinomas. More data suggest a relationship between tumor metabolism and CLOCK genes and their regulations. Based on all these data, the circadian rhythm, so the time of day, may need to be taken into account during cancer therapy.]

Clinical Oncology

APRIL 30, 2020

[Molecular residual tumor monitoring in solid cancers]

SZÁSZ A. Marcell, TOBIÁS Bálint, KÓSA János, LAKATOS Péter

[Blood-based diagnostics has long been used in the oncological practice of solid tumors, but its full potential is just unfolding recently. Quantitative measurement of tumor markers, circulating tumor cells, and some of their products or components have now become available and are part of a multimodal system that provides additive parameters in clinical decision making. The most challenging oncological questions can be answered by the detection, characterization and measurement of circulating free DNA (cfDNA), which, due to its growing importance, bears the potential of incorporation into routine practice. In this overview, we review the „blood impressions” of solid tumors and present the most promising results in different patient groups, especially in lung, breast, colon, and bladder tumors, which are also valid for other solid tumors.]

Lege Artis Medicinae

NOVEMBER 30, 2020

[Focus on Lege Artis Medicinae (LAM)]

VASAS Lívia, GEGES József

[Three decades ago, LAM was launched with the goal of providing scientific information about medicine and its frontiers. From the very beginning, LAM has also concerned a special subject area while connecting medicine with the world of art. In the palette of medical articles, it remained a special feature to this day. The analysis of the history of LAM to date was performed using internationally accepted publication guidelines and scientific databases as a pledge of objectivity. We examined the practice of LAM if it meets the main criteria, the professional expectations of our days, when publishing contents of the traditional printed edition and its electronic version. We explored the visibility of articles in the largest bibliographic and scientific metric databases, and reviewed the LAM's place among the Hun­ga­rian professional journals. Our results show that in recent years LAM has gained international reputation des­pite publishing in Hungarian spoken by a few people. This is due to articles with foreign co-authors as well as references to LAM in articles written exclusively by foreign researchers. The journal is of course full readable in the Hungarian bibliographic databases, and its popularity is among the leading ones. The great virtue of the journal is the wide spectrum of the authors' affiliation, with which they cover almost completely the Hungarian health care institutional sys­tem. The special feature of its columns is enhanced by the publication of writings on art, which may increase Hungarian and foreign interest like that of medical articles.]

Clinical Neuroscience

NOVEMBER 30, 2020

The applications of transcranial Doppler in ischemic stroke

FINNSDÓTTIR Herdis, SZEGEDI István, OLÁH László, CSIBA László

Background: This overview provides a summary of the applications of transcranial Doppler (TCD) in ischemic stroke. Results: A fast-track neurovascular ultrasound protocol has been developed for detecting occlusion or stenosis. The technique is more reliable in the carotid area than in the posterior circulation. By monitoring the pulsatility index the in­crea­sed intracranial pressure can be diagnosed. TIBI score was developed for grading residual flow. TCD has been shown to accurately predict complete or any recanalization. Regarding recanalization, TCD has a sensitivity of 92%, a specificity of 88%, a positive predictive value of 96%, a negative predictive value of 78% and an overall accuracy of 91%, respectively. Sonothrombolysis seemed to be a promising application but randomized controlled trials have shown that it does not improve clinical outcome. TCD examination can detect microembolic signals (MES) which are associated with an increased risk of stroke. Micro­em­boli were detected in symptomatic and asymptomatic carotid artery stenosis and during carotid endarterectomy. The number of microemboli can be decreased by antithrombotic therapy. Contrast en­chan­ced examination and Valsalva maneuver with continuous TCD monitoring can accurately screen for right-to-left shunt.

Clinical Oncology

AUGUST 30, 2019

[Role of calcium metabolism in malignant diseases]

MÉSZÁROS Szilvia, TAKÁCS István

[Calcium plays a key role in a wide range of biologic functions. It is involved in skeletal mineralization, muscle functions, nerve transmission, and hormonal secretion and modulate various cellular functions too. Lines of research, on possible association of calcium metabolism regulation with tumorigenesis have been extensively studied in the recent decades. Implying disruptions and/or alterations of known regulatory and molecular pathways can lead to severe, sometimes life-threatening complications. The shift in physiological regulation and pathological factors also affect bone metastases and hypercalcaemia in cancer patients. For this reason, it is important to know about the changes in calcium metabolism and its treatment options in cancerous diseases.]

Journal of Nursing Theory and Practice

DECEMBER 30, 2019

[Perfusionist’s status in Hungary and the application of the low prime in coronary artery bypass]

DEÁK András, FUSZ Katalin, PRÉMUSZ Viktória, RAPOSA L. Bence, VÁRADYNÉ Horváth Ágnes, MADARÁSZ Ildikó, OLÁH András

[With the development of the equipments of extracorporeal circulation, international studies underline reducing the amount of filling fluid. Our retrospective study was conducted at the Heart Surgery Clinic of the University of Pécs between 1 January 2017 - 31 December 2017 with ECC cardiac operated patients. During the document analysis, data were collected from 157 patients between 50 and 70 years who underwent CAB surgery. They were classified into Low- (n=47) and Standard-prime (n=110) group. Medium negative correlation (r=-0.28; p<0.001) was found between prime/body surface area and haematocrit during last perfusion. As inflammatory parameter, the last measured CRP values were 36.00 mg/l (low) vs. 70.62 mg/l (standard). Our research justified the use of low-prime during ECC. The implementation of the method requires the scientific advancement of perfusionists, the preparation of national protocols and the improvement of the perfusionist’s training and legal background. ]

Journal of Nursing Theory and Practice

DECEMBER 30, 2019

[Nutritional changes in the elderly]

NAGY-LŐRINCZ Zsuzsanna, ZÁMBÓ Leonóra, MARGARITOVITS Tijana, VARGA-NAGY Veronika, VARGA Anita, ZENTAI Andrea

[Since population ageing is one of the greatest problem of our time, we should aim not only to increase life expectancy but also healthy life years. Ageing is considered to be a normal biological process that can be characterized by the decline of body functions contributing to the age-related changes in nutrition as well. Although the process is not necessarily accompanied by pathological conditions (such as malnutrition, dehydration, obstipation, cognitive deterioration, fragility, polypharmacy), the evolving physiological changes undoubtedly increase the susceptibility to diseases and accidents. Elderly care should be adapted to the evolving changes, and should meet the person’s specific needs. ]

Hypertension and nephrology

NOVEMBER 04, 2020

[Wearing a face mask: effect on a doctor – patient relationship. Complicating factors and their compensations]

VONYIK Gabriella, FARKAS Martin, TURNER Andrea, FINTA Ervin, BORSZÉKI Judit

[Wearing face masks plays an important role to effectively decrease the chance of transmitting respiratory diseases. Face masks commonly worn during the Covid-19 pandemic to shield the mouth and the nose, cover about 60- 70% of the area of the face that is crucial for the effective verbal and nonverbal communication and perception of mental states. Face masks may complicate social interaction especially in the medical setting where communication skills and doctor-patient relationship are essential to primary care consultations. Literature was reviewed on the impact of such face masks on effective doctor and patient communication as well as useful alternative ways are suggested to compensate them in order to maintain the effective doctor-patient interaction.]

Clinical Neuroscience

SEPTEMBER 30, 2020

Neuroscience highlights: Main cell types underlying memory and spatial navigation

KRABOTH Zoltán, KÁLMÁN Bernadette

Interest in the hippocampal formation and its role in navigation and memory arose in the second part of the 20th century, at least in part due to the curious case of Henry G. Molaison, who underwent brain surgery for intractable epilepsy. The temporal association observed between the removal of his entorhinal cortex along with a significant part of hippocampus and the developing severe memory deficit inspired scientists to focus on these regions. The subsequent discovery of the so-called place cells in the hippocampus launched the description of many other functional cell types and neuronal networks throughout the Papez-circuit that has a key role in memory processes and spatial information coding (speed, head direction, border, grid, object-vector etc). Each of these cell types has its own unique characteristics, and together they form the so-called “Brain GPS”. The aim of this short survey is to highlight for practicing neurologists the types of cells and neuronal networks that represent the anatomical substrates and physiological correlates of pathological entities affecting the limbic system, especially in the temporal lobe. For that purpose, we survey early discoveries along with the most relevant neuroscience observations from the recent literature. By this brief survey, we highlight main cell types in the hippocampal formation, and describe their roles in spatial navigation and memory processes. In recent decades, an array of new and functionally unique neuron types has been recognized in the hippocampal formation, but likely more remain to be discovered. For a better understanding of the heterogeneous presentations of neurological disorders affecting this anatomical region, insights into the constantly evolving neuroscience behind may be helpful. The public health consequences of diseases that affect memory and spatial navigation are high, and grow as the population ages, prompting scientist to focus on further exploring this brain region.

Lege Artis Medicinae

JULY 01, 2020

[Sarcopenia – muscle loss – pathomechanism, clinical presentation and metabolic comorbidities]

VERECKEI Edit, HODINKA László

[Sarcopenia, or the age-related involution of muscle strength and muscle mass, is a serious public health concern, due to the growing number of elderly population caused by nowadays demographic changes i.e. prolonged life expectancy. By ageing, the muscle tissue is shrinking gradually, leading to the loss of muscle strength and masses. This condition is called sarcopenia. Sar­co­penia is the simultaneous decrease of muscle mass, muscle strength and functional independence. In parallel the physical performance deteriorates (weakness, slowness and poor physical balancing). Fatigue, el­derly behaviour and weight loss are the consequences of these accumulating deficits, which associate with cognitive decline and result in increasing social isolation. The primary form of sarcopenia is the decrease of the energy production of muscle cells and then the death of muscle cells. Se­con­dary, endocrine dysfunctions, diseases of the nervous system, decreased physical activity, malnutrition or malabsorption, chronic infection accelerate the process and aggravate the patient’s condition. Complex genetic, biochemical and endocrine mechanisms take part in the development of sarcopenia. This involution is due to the impaired balance of restoring and depleting processes of muscles. A questionnaire and algorithm have been developed to recognize, screen and diagnose the risks of sarcopenic condition; these separate the sarcopenic and non-sarcopenic patients with specific cut-off values. Sar­co­penia can be diagnosed based on walking speed, decreased handgrip strength and measured or calculated muscle mass in persons over 65. Sarcopenia can be considered as a phenomenon of “physiological” aging, however, it becomes a disease when diagnostic cut-offs are exceeded and the patient experiences functional disability and declining quality of life. Prevention and treatment of sarcopenia and reducing the risk of falling are based on regular active resistance and coordination exercises. Options for pharmaceutical treatments are limited since despite of identified molecular targets there are no convincingly effective innovative therapy on the horizon. Nevertheless, there are some weak evidence for efficacy of the application of amino acids stimulating muscle cell differentiation, such as leucine or the analogue of beta-hydoxy-methylbutyrate beside exercise therapy.]