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Hypertension and nephrology

SEPTEMBER 21, 2012

[Hypertensive and cardiovascular risks of nonsteroidal antiinflammatory drugs]

FARSANG Csaba, BEDROS J. Róbert, ALFÖLDI Sándor

[Nonsteroidal antiinflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) are among the most frequently used medicines. During the last ten years several original publications, reviews and meta-analyses were published on the cardiovascular safety of NSAIDs and the results underlined their potentially harmful cardiovascular side effects. It can also be emphasized that there are substantial differences between different compounds, and the CV risk does not depend on the ratio of COX-1/COX-2 selectivity. Cardiovascular risk can be increased by all NSAIDs and paracetamol with the possible exception of naproxen and probably aceclofenac.]

LAM Extra for General Practicioners

APRIL 20, 2012

[THE RISK OF NONSTEROIDAL ANTIINFLAMMATORY DRUGS]

FARSANG Csaba

[During the past ten years, a number of original publications, reviews and metaanalyses were published on the cardiovascular (CV) safety of nonsteroidal antiinflammatory drugs (NSAIDs). These data were summarised in several previous publications. As this group of medicines is very frequently used and many of them are available over the counter (OTC), their risks require particular attention. Recently, new analyses have been published on previously discussed preparations as well as on new drugs that had been omitted from previous analyses (paracetamol, aceclofenac), thus, it is important to review these data and draw attention again to differences in side effects among NSAIDs.]

Lege Artis Medicinae

FEBRUARY 20, 2012

[The risk of nonsteroidal antiinflammatory drugs]

FARSANG Csaba

[During the past ten years, a number of original publications, reviews and metaanalyses were published on the cardiovascular (CV) safety of nonsteroidal antiinflammatory drugs (NSAIDs). These data were summarised in several previous publications. As this group of medicines is very frequently used and many of them are available over the counter (OTC), their risks require particular attention. Recently, new analyses have been published on previously discussed preparations as well as on new drugs that had been omitted from previous analyses (paracetamol, aceclofenac), thus, it is important to review these data and draw attention again to differences in side effects among NSAIDs.]

AUGUST 15, 2011

The Paracetamol (Acetaminophen) In Stroke?

Original abstract:High body temperature in the first 12-24 h after stroke onset is associated with poor functional outcome. The Paracetamol (Acetaminophen) In Stroke (PAIS) trial aimed to assess whether early treatment with paracetamol improves functional outcome in patients with acute stroke by reducing body temperature and preventing fever. METHODS: In a multicentre, randomised, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial, patients with ischaemic stroke or intracerebral haemorrhage and body temperature between 36 degrees C and 39 degrees C were randomly assigned treatment with paracetamol (6 g daily) or placebo within 12 h from symptom onset. Treatment allocation was based on a computer-generated list of random numbers with varying block size. The primary outcome was improvement beyond expectation on the modified Rankin scale at 3 months, according to the sliding dichotomy approach. This trial is registered, number ISRCTN74418480. FINDINGS: Between March, 2003, and May, 2008, 1400 patients were randomly allocated treatment. 260 (37%) of 697 patients receiving paracetamol and 232 (33%) of 703 receiving placebo improved beyond expectation (adjusted odds ratio [OR] 1.20, 95% CI 0.96-1.50). In a post-hoc analysis of patients with baseline body temperature 37-39 degrees C, treatment with paracetamol was associated with improved outcome (1.43, 1.02-1.97). There were 55 serious adverse events in the paracetamol group (8%) and 70 in the placebo group (10%). INTERPRETATION: These results do not support routine use of high-dose paracetamol in patients with acute stroke. Paracetamol might have a beneficial effect on functional outcome in patients admitted with a body temperature 37-39 degrees C, but this post-hoc finding needs further study. FUNDING: Netherlands Heart Foundation.