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Hypertension and nephrology

OCTOBER 23, 2019

[The importance of brain-derived neurotrophic factor in psychopathology and cardiovascular conditions: psychosomatic connections]

LÁSZLÓ Andrea, LÉNÁRT Lilla, ILLÉSY Lilla, FEKETE Andrea, NEMCSIK János

[Cardiovascular diseases and mood disorders are common public health problems worldwide. Their connections are widely studied, and the role of neurotrophins, especially brain derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) is already supposed in both conditions. However, no reviews are available describing possible associations between cardiovascular risk and mood disorders based on BDNF. Decreased level of BDNF is observed in depression and its connection to hypertension has also been demonstrated with affecting the arterial baroreceptors, reninangiotensin system and endothelial nitric oxide synthase activity. BDNF was also found to be the predictor of cardiovascular outcome in different patient populations. Our aim was to overview the present knowledge in this area demonstrating a new aspect of the associations between mood disorders and cardiovascular diseases through the mediation of BDNF. These findings might enlighten a new psychosomatic connection and suggest a new therapeutic target that is beneficial both in respect of mood disorders and cardiovascular pathology.]

Clinical Neuroscience

NOVEMBER 30, 2020

[The connection between the socioeconomic status and stroke in Budapest]

VASTAGH Ildikó, SZŐCS Ildikó, OBERFRANK Ferenc, AJTAY András, BERECZKI Dániel

[The well-known gap bet­ween stroke mortality of Eastern and Western Euro­pean countries may reflect the effect of socioeconomic diffe­rences. Such a gap may be present between neighborhoods of different wealth within one city. We set forth to compare age distribution, incidence, case fatality, mortality, and risk factor profile of stroke patients of the poorest (District 8) and wealthiest (District 12) districts of Budapest. We synthesize the results of our former comparative epidemiological investigations focusing on the association of socioeconomic background and features of stroke in two districts of the capital city of Hungary. The “Budapest District 8–12 project” pointed out the younger age of stroke patients of the poorer district, and established that the prevalence of smoking, alcohol-consumption, and untreated hypertension is also higher in District 8. The “Six Years in Two Districts” project involving 4779 patients with a 10-year follow-up revealed higher incidence, case fatality and mortality of stroke in the less wealthy district. The younger patients of the poorer region show higher risk-factor prevalence, die younger and their fatality grows faster during long-term follow-up. The higher prevalence of risk factors and the higher fatality of the younger age groups in the socioeconomically deprived district reflect the higher vulnerability of the population in District 8. The missing link between poverty and stroke outcome seems to be lifestyle risk-factors and lack of adherence to primary preventive efforts. Public health campaigns on stroke prevention should focus on the young generation of socioeconomi­cally deprived neighborhoods. ]

Lege Artis Medicinae

SEPTEMBER 30, 2020

[The pain-trigger role of cytokines in the nervous system – the direct analgesic effect of anti-cytokine therapy ]

HODINKA László, VERECKEI Edit

[Nociceptive, neuropathic and central me­chanisms are involved in the perception, transmission and processing of chronic pain and shaping of cerebral pain image. Alar­mins – molecules alarming defence and signing the presence of pathogens and tissue damage - trigger a series of pathogenic events resulting in inflammatory pain stimuli. Proinflammatory cytokines play a determining role in the pain perception at the level of the nervous system. Continuous inflammatory stimuli while sensitizing the periferic and central neurons activate the pain-related cerebral areas and develop the complex pain image, the pain matrix. Ce­reb­ral functional connections are operating in networks and can be visualized by functional MRI. Cytokines activate the neurons directly or indirectly by other neuromediators. Cytokine receptors are expressed on no­ciceptors and even on higher-level neurons and on various non-neural cells, such as microglia and astrocytes. The most ubiquitous cytokines are the Tumour Necrosis Factor and Interleukin 6 in the nervous sys­tem. The signaling pathways are the Nuclear Factor κB and the Janus-kinase enzyme system. The proinflammatory cytokines and the Janus-kinase are therefore primary therapeutic targets. Anti-cytokine biologicals and small molecular kinase inhibitors decrease the pain and improve functional activity in rheumatoid arthritis. Decrease of pain was more pronounced than expected only from the decrease of the clinical biomarkers of inflammation. The early and ra­pid painkiller effect of targeted biological and chemical-biological response modifiers is attributed to their direct analgesic effect on the brain.]

Lege Artis Medicinae

JULY 20, 2019

[Empirical examination of the persistence value among the students studying health-care at the beginning of student professionalization]

DINYÁNÉ Szabó Mariann, PUSZTAI Gabriella

[INTRODUCTION – Students in healthcare studies can help maintain the mental base and maintain their health if the lecturers know the degree of student persistence. When entering higher education, it is possible to measure the pre-university experience. Persistence determines the student's relationship to learning and can be a predictor of learning success. PARTICIPANTS AND METHODS – A questionnaire study (N = 200) of the 1st year student (N = 200) of the Health Care Organization (BSc) of the University of Debrecen and Semmelweis University. For the continuous Persistence Variable a descriptive statistical method was used, an independent two-sample t-test was used for comparison between groups, and Hedges-g was used to express the effect size. We used the GLM (General Linear Model) model for fitting the persistence model. By means of factor analysis, we constructed factors from the significant predictor variables of the GLM model, which helped us assessing students' chances of learning. To quantify the strength of evidence against null hypothesis P < 0.05 (5% significance) was chosen as a standard level for concluding that there is evidence against the hypothesis tested. Statistical analysis was performed with IBM SPSS Statistics 24.0 (SPSS, Chicago, IL). RESULTS – The persistence factor loadings can be divided into three types: high, medium and low. High persistence rearranges student preferences, low interest persistence, minimal interest in academic engagement. In the case of middle-ranking people, the importance of volunteering (life-experience) and friendship is paramount. CONCLUSIONS – The results indicate that at the beginning of the student life there is a willingness, diligence, acceptance of academic values, interest or lack of interest in future success studies. During the stu­dies, these features can be monitored and the necessary interventions can be made in time.]

Lege Artis Medicinae

MARCH 20, 2019

[Long-term CPAP compliance among Sleep Apnea Patients at the Sleep Laboratory of the Hungarian Defense Forces Medical Center ]

DOMBOVÁRI Magdolna, BERNÁT István, TERRAY-HORVÁTH Attila, CSATLÓS Dalma, HARGITTAY Csenge, TORZSA Péter

[Obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSAS) is the most common sleep disorder, with a prevalence of 2-4% in the overall popula­tion. It is a risk factor for cardiovascular diseases and its daytime symptoms significantly impair the patients’ quality of life and increase the risk of work and road accidents. Its first-line treatment is the CPAP device (Continuous Positive Airway Pres­sure) the effectiveness of which is significantly determined by the compliance of the patient. Although the issue of compliance in such treatment is a very important factor, long-term studies including a large number of patients have not been published yet, and there are no known data about it in Hungary. OBJECTIVE - Examining the long-term compliance of CPAP among OSAS patients in a sleep laboratory in Hungary. METHOD - 3403 OSAS patients were selected for our study between January 1, 2007, and September 30, 2017. The diagnosis and titration of effective CPAP pressure were determined by polysomnography. Patients were controlled after 2 months of therapy and then every 6 and 12 months. During the care, their compliance value was determined by data downloaded from their device's memory card. RESULTS - The mean age (± SD) of patients was 59.0 (± 10.5) years, most of them were male, 2676 (78.6%), their average body mass index (BMI) was 32.6 (± 5.25) kg/m2, their average Epworth Sleepiness Scale score was 11.4 (± 5.0), their average Apnea-Hypopnoe index was 51.0 (± 19.5) events/hour. The average usage time of the CPAP device was 5.0 (± 1.9) hours. 72.3% of the patients used the device for over 4 hours and 27.7% used it for less than 4 hours. 34.7% of the patients used the device for more than 6 hours. The Epworth Sleepiness Score showed a significant and dose-dependent improvement over CPAP treatment, with a greater improvement among patients who used the machine for longer hours. The highest score improvement was achieved by users who used CPAP between 6-7 hours, averaging 7.3 (± 3.2) points (p <0.001). CONCLUSIONS - Our present study shows that high average compliance can be achie­ved among well-adjusted and well-maintained patients. ]

Journal of Nursing Theory and Practice

AUGUST 30, 2018

[Work Values Preference among hospital midwives]

GEBRINÉ ÉLES Krisztina, SÁRVÁRY Andrea, SÁRVÁRY Attila, TAKÁCS Péter, LAMPEK Kinga

[The Aim of the Study: The aim of the research was to explore the structure of work values among midwives. Material and Method: Cross sectional study was used with Super‘s Work Values Inventory from 13 hospitals across Hungary. Our questionnaire was divided into 370 midwives, 224 were evaluated. We calculated mean and standard deviation in descriptive statistical analysis. We did factor analysis; variance analysis and post-hoc LSD (Least Significant Difference) test. Results: The most preferred work values were altruism, finances and hierarchy. The level of education influenced the hierarchy of work values. The factor analysis separated two secondary factors: working condition and the self-realisation. There was a significant difference between midwives with OKJ education level and midwives with BSc degree (p=0,014), and other qualifications (p=0,033). Conclusions: Our results suggest that a higher level of education gives the foundation of professional competencies which enable the employee to take conscious consideration of other employee’s views in health care. ]

Journal of Nursing Theory and Practice

JUNE 30, 2018

Reliability and Validity of the Turkish Version of the Brief Scales for Coping Profile in Textile Workers

ORNEK Koseoglu Ozlem, TEMEL Yavuz Guler

The aim of this study is to adapt the BSCP (Brief Scales for Coping Profile) scale to Turkish and to investigate its psychometric properties among textile workers. Methods: This a psychometric study with cross-sectional design. After translation procedures, the BSCP was administered to workers. Content validity of the BSCP was investigated with the CVI index and reliability was investigated with Cronbach’s Alpha. The construct validity was investigated with exploratory and confirmatory factor analysis. Results: The psychometric properties of the original BSCP were supported by the Turkish version of the BSCP. According to the exploratory factor analysis, the BSCP had six subscales. The reliability of the BSCP subscales’ values were 0.692, 0.712, 0.661, 0.756, 0.786, and 0.777 respectively. Conclusion: The Turkish version of the BSCP showed acceptable reliability and validity which is the first adapted scale in Turkey for evaluating workers’ coping profiles. The scale will be a good option to provide basic data about workers’ coping profiles which may be used for prolonging stress management skills and health promotion programs by occupational health and psychiatric nurses, physicians, psychologist and safety experts.

Clinical Neuroscience

JULY 30, 2018

Can high uric acid levels be an independent risk factor for acute ischemic stroke due to large-artery atherosclerosis?

ACAR Türkan, ARAS Guzey Yesim, GÜL Sinem Sidika, ACAR Atılgan Bilgehan

Introduction - Uric acid is a molecule that is known to act as a natural antioxidant in acute oxidative stress conditions such as acute ischemic stroke (AIS). Although there are several studies on the prognostic value of serum uric acid (UA) level, especially the AIS, its importance in ischemic stroke is still controversial. Our aim in this study is to investigate whether the serum UA level is an indicative biomarker in the large-artery atherosclerosis in the AIS etiology. Material and method - Of the patients admitted to Sakarya University Training and Research Hospital Depart-ment of Neurology between January 2017 and November 2017, 91 hospitalized patients, who had AIS diagnosis and had their uric acid levels measured, were analyzed retrospectively. Patients with diabetes mellitus (DM), hypertension (HT), smoking habit, obesity, gout, hyperlipidemia (HL) and renal failure were excluded from the study. Patients were classified as anterior system and posterior system infarct. Then, patients were divided into two groups, one with internal carotid artery (ICA) > 50% stenosis and the other with ICA < 50% stenosis according to carotid-vertebral artery doppler USG examination performed for etiology. Serum UA, total bilirubin, direct bilirubin and indirect bilirubin levels of both groups were statistically compared. Results - In the comparison of serum UA values of ICA>50% stenosis and ICA<50% stenosis group of AIS patients, a statistically significant difference was found between the UA levels (p<0.000), but there was no difference between total bilirubin, direct bilirubin and indirect bilirubin values (p>0.05). Conclusion - High uric acid levels can be considered an independent, indicative risk factor for large-artery disease in AIS.

Hypertension and nephrology

APRIL 29, 2021

[Independent risk factors for fatal cases of the Covid-19 pandemic]

KÉKES Ede

[Already at the beginning of the Covid-19 pandemic, it was known to be severe and critical mortality rates (crude fatality rate (CFR) is a major and crucial factor in this age on the other hand, men have a higher incidence of fatalities. Another known fact is that comorbidities (coronary heart disease, hypertension, diabetes, COPD) are more common in severe or fatal cases. However, for these the causal role of diseases has not been clarified for a long time, then it turned out that the occurrence corresponded to that age observed population age ratios (1, 2).]

Clinical Neuroscience

MARCH 30, 2021

[Psychometric properties of the Hungarian Adult Attachment Scale]

ŐRI Dorottya, KAPORNAI Krisztina, BAJI Ildikó, KISS Enikő

[The revised Adult Attachment Scale (AAS) developed by N. L. Collins is a widely used questionnaire to measure adult attachment. However, its psychometric properties have not been investigated in Hungary. We aimed to confirm the key psychometric properties of the Hungarian version of the AAS focusing on reliability indices on a population that consis­ted of depressed and non-depressed young adults. The AAS is a self-report questionnaire, in which two different dimensional evaluating systems are possible: the original (close, depend, and anxiety) and the alternative scoring system (anxiety, avoidance). Our study population consisted of young adults with a history of major depression (n = 264, median age = 25.7 years) and their never-depressed biological siblings (n = 244, median age = 24.0). The internal consistency of close, anxiety, and avoidance scales were satisfactory (Cronbach-α >0.7). The consistency of the depend scale was slightly lower than expected (Cronbach-α = 0.62). Test-retest reliability was good for all of the scales, it ranged from 0.73 to 0.78 after 14 months of follow-up period. The scale showed good discrimination as tested by the differences of close and anxiety attachment dimensions between the groups (p<0.01). More­over, we were able to differentiate the currently dep­res­sed subjects based on these attachment dimensions. Explo­ra­tory and confirmatory factor analyses were conducted, and a bifactor solution proved optimal model fit. The three dimensions of the AAS has not been confirmed. However, the close and anxiety scales of AAS were found to be adequate. Our results also indicate that attachment features correlate with major depressive episodes in adulthood.]