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Hypertension and nephrology

FEBRUARY 20, 2020

Hypertension and nephrology

FEBRUARY 20, 2019

[Sexual problems in CKD – a narrative review]

TÖRÖK Marietta, JÖRGEN Hegbrant, GIOVANNI Strippoli

[Sexual dysfunction is highly prevalent in patients with CKD, especially those receiving dialysis. Given the high prevalence of sexual problems in CKD patients, there has been growing interest in finding effective treatments for sexual dysfunction. PDE5i and zinc have been found promising interventions for treating sexual dysfunction in men with CKD in a systematic review of RCTs, but the evidence supporting their routine use in CKD patients is limited. In the Collaborative Depression and Sexual Dysfunction (CDS) Study, over a cohort of 1611 men in hemodialysis, 83% reported erectile dysfunction and 47% reported severe erectile dysfunction, with depression strongly correlated to this problem. Similarly, sexual dysfunction was highly prevalent in women undergoing hemodialysis. Of the 659 respondents, 555 (84%) reported sexual dysfunction and more than half of sexually active women reported sexual dysfunction, associated with age, depressive symptoms, menopause, low serum albumin, and diuretic therapy.]

Clinical Neuroscience

NOVEMBER 30, 2016

[The role of zonisamide in the treatment of women with epilepsy]

JUHOS Vera

[The antiepileptic drugs can effect fertility, development of gynecological diseases and occurence of sexual problems. They can cause a number of “cosmetic” problem and also influence the selection of safe contraceptive method. Many antiepileptic drugs can cause congenital malformations or affect the new-born child’s psychomotor and cognitive development, therefore during pregnancy should be treated with extreme caution in women with epilepsy. Most types of epilepsies accompany the patient through their whole life. Women spend almost the third of their lives after menopause and - due to the formation of associated diseases as well - this period is also special. According to the 2013 recommendation of International League Epilepsy (ILAE), zonisamide is one of the first-line antiepileptic drugs in focal epilepsy. In my review I discuss women’s epilepsy in the viewpoint of the application of zonisamid. ]

Hypertension and nephrology

APRIL 10, 2016

[Rilmenidin - a versatile combination partner in the treatment of high blood pressure]

KÉKES Ede

[The rilmenidin as an imidazoline agonist drug strongly decreases the central sympathetic activity, release of renine and the RAS activity. Because of these advantageous properties the peripheral vascular resistance falls and the blood pressure is decreased. Today it is excellent tool for combination therapy. Useful especially in stress induced hypertension. The antihypertensive effects of ACE inhibitors sor calcium antagonists are increased by rilmenidine. This drug decreases the insuline resistance, it has a positive effect on the carbohydrate and fat metabolism, because it is useful as a complementary therapy in metabolic syndrome and diabetes mellitus of type II. It is useful in stress induced hypertension, and in menopause as well.]

LAM KID

SEPTEMBER 19, 2014

[Forgotten agent: raloxifene]

BENKŐ Ágota

[The largest group of the patients with osteoporosis is postmenopausal women characterized by a state of menopausal hormone deficiency which is results in accelerated bone loss. This increased bone resorption significantly elevates the risk of bone fractures including the most common type, i.e. vertebral fractures. In addition to the increased risk of fractures, estrogen deficiency affects other organs, thus, increasing the incidence of cardiovascular diseases, cancers, mood disorders and the symptoms of menopausal syndrome in women after menopause. In postmenopausal osteoporosis, the primary objective is to maintain the existing bone mass, a priority for the prevention and treatment of bone fractures. Hormone deficiency may be prevented by the administration of estrogen but the treatment may have adverse effects such as increased risk of endometrial cancer. An etiological therapy is desirable where the compound used for treatment exerts effects similar to that of estrogen to prevent postmenopausal bone loss as well as reduces the risk of cardiovascular disease without the stimulation of reproductive tissues.]

Lege Artis Medicinae

NOVEMBER 22, 2012

[Is postmenopausal hormone therapy suitable for cardiovascular prevention?]

LÁSZLÓ Ádám

[After menopause, coronary disease and infarction become increasingly common in women owing to estrogen deficiency. Therefore, hormon replacement therapy (HRT) had been widely used to prevent these problems and manage postmenopausal symptoms. In 2002, a large, randomised, placebo-controlled study reported that HRT was accompanied by serious side effects and was not suitable for cardiovascular prevention. However, subsequent re-alanyses of the data of this study and new studies in the past 10 years suggest that in women younger than 60 years and if started within 10 years after the menopause, HRT has a number of advantages and very few disadvantages. It substantially improves quality of life, while the absolute risk of side effects is small, and HRT is suitable for the primary prevention of coronary diseases. I summarise the cardiovascular aspects of menopausal hormone therapy, in order to help the necessary paradigm shift in this matter.]

Lege Artis Medicinae

MARCH 21, 2006

[CARDIOVASCULAR EFFECTS OF MENOPAUSAL HORMONE REPLACEMENT THERAPY]

PARAGH György, HARANGI Mariann

[The incidence of coronary heart disease in women rises sharply in the years following menopause. Hormone replacement therapy involves the administration of oestrogen, which provides postmenopausal symptom relief and reverses the changes in calcium and lipid metabolism. Moreover, oestrogen is also postulated to engage multiple mechanisms that defend against hypertension. Early observations suggested that postmenopausal women treated with hormone replacement therapy have significantly reduced cardiovascular risk. However, the results of primary and secondary prevention randomized clinical trials confirmed an increased cardiovascular risk rather than a beneficial effect of hormone replacement therapy in highrisk women. Controversy between results of observational and randomized clinical trials may partly be due to the unexplored genetic background. The authors summarize the effects of oestrogen on lipids, inflammation, haemostatic parameters, blood pressure and vascular wall. Genetic factors that modulate the effect of oestrogen as well as current recommendations on hormone replacement therapy after menopause in high risk women are also presented.]

Lege Artis Medicinae

FEBRUARY 21, 2004

[POSTMENOPAUSAL HYPERTENSION]

SZÉKÁCS Béla

[Women with normal cycles on the average have lower blood pressure than age matched men. From the fifth decade of life increasing average blood pressure values of females reach or even exceed the levels of males. The frequency of hypertension among women in menopause and postmenopause is 3-4 times greater than in premenopause. This great difference can not be explained by the age dependent increase in blood pressure. There are several pathological components in the background of the elevation of blood pressure following the reduction and failure of female sex hormone production. Among these components are lifestyle changes, reduced physical activity, growing body weight, increased sympathetic activity, higher RAS (renin-angiotensin system) influence and increased salt dependence of blood pressure seem to be the dominant factors. Contrary to earlier suggestions recent clinical findings have proved that estrogen or combined hormone replacement therapy did not increase but rather slightly reduced the blood pressure in menopausal and postmenopausal hypertensive women. Therefore, hypertension itself should not be the contraindication against carefully managed hormone replacement therapy. The therapy is frequently used for preventing severe osteoporosis in spite of the disappointing cardiovascular results of the WHI and HERS trials. In the Joint National Committee 7 there are no special recommendations which would strictly prefer one or another antihypertensive agents in the pharmacological treatment of postmenopausal hypertension. However doctors are assisted in their individual therapeutical decisions by certain clinical and experimental findings which refer to higher sympathic activity, enhanced RAS influence and increased salt dependency in the pathomechanism of postmenopausal hypertension.]

Ca&Bone

MAY 20, 2004

[The role and effects of progestogens in menopausal hormone therapy]

ÁCS Nándor, MERICLI Metin, VERMES Gábor, LANGMÁR Zoltán

[The adequate therapy of postmenopausal hormone deficiency is estrogen replacement. However, the risk of endometrium hyperplasia and carcinoma is significantly increased among users of estrogen as monotherapy.To minimize the risk of endometrial cancer, a progestogen must be added to estrogen therapy. While progestogens may inhibit the cardiovascular effects of estrogens, they do not significantly influence the effects of estrogen on bone. The increased risk of breast cancer among menopausal hormone therapy users seems to be the consequence of progestin administration.There are notable differences among progestins in their effects and side effects, thus, in the future, therapeutic protocols should be tailored individually.The differential effects of various progestogens is an exciting area to study, partly because it may have clinical consequences, partly, because it provides opportunities for far-reaching research.]

Ca&Bone

FEBRUARY 14, 2007

[Higher bone fracture prevalence in postmenopausal pollen allergic women]

FERENCZ VIKTÓRIA, MÉSZÁROS SZILVIA, CSUPOR EMŐKE, TÓTH EDIT, BORS Katalin, FALUS ANDRÁS, HORVÁTH CSABA

[Our aim was to investigate whether pollen allergy can affect bone mass and fractures in postmenopausal women. A total of 125 postmenopausal pollen allergic women (mean age 61.26 years) were split into four groups: treated neither with H1 histamine receptor (H1R) antagonist nor with inhaled corticosteroid (n=43), treated only with H1R antagonist (n=53), treated both with H1R antagonist and inhaled corticosteroid (n=17), treated only with inhaled corticosteroid (n=12) for at least five years, seasonally. One-hundred non-allergic postmenopausal subjects matched for age, body mass index (BMI) and age at menopause served as controls. Overweight and obesity (25 kg/m2 ≤ BMI) were common among allergic women (76%). Allergic patients without treatment had a slightly lower bone density than their non-allergic mates. Untreated allergic had almost triple the rate of prevalent low-energy fractures (distal forearm, hip and clinical vertebral fractures: 34.9%) compared to non-allergic women (13%, χ2 p=0.003). Bone fracture occurred more often in H1R-only treated patients (30.19%) than in controls (χ2 p=0.01), however, clinical vertebral or hip fractures developed neither in those treated only with H1R antagonist nor in those who received both H1R antagonist and inhaled corticosteroid. Bone fractures were more frequent among patients with inhaled steroid treatment than among patients with a combined treatment of inhaled steroid and antihistamine (50% vs. 29.4%). BMI predicted prevalent fractures at 1.278 (95% CI, 1.047 to 1.559, p=0.016) for 1 kg/m2 increase among untreated allergic patients. In conclusion we found a high prevalence of low-energy fractures among pollen-allergic postmenopausal women, which was associated with obesity. It is possible that the H1R antagonists compensate for the negative effect of pollen-allergy and the adverse effect of inhaled corticosteroid treatment on bone fracture risk.]